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Big Question: How can knowing another language create understanding? Author: James Rumford Genre: Biography.

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Presentation on theme: "Big Question: How can knowing another language create understanding? Author: James Rumford Genre: Biography."— Presentation transcript:

1 Big Question: How can knowing another language create understanding? Author: James Rumford Genre: Biography

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3 Review Games Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

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5 village except explain quick charge bridge knowledge question equal queen excited expect Texas fudge excellent exercise quart liquid quilt expert expedition aquarium inquire frequent advantage

6 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Big Question: How can knowing another language create understanding? Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

7 Vocabulary Words ancient link scholars seeker temple translate triumph uncover decipher hieroglyphs spellbound converse symbol Vocabulary WordsMore Words to Know

8 Monday Question of the Day How can knowing another language create understanding?

9 Today we will learn about: Build Concepts Graphic Sources Ask Questions Build Background Vocabulary Fluency: Phrasing Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Consonants /j/, /ks/, and /kw/ Communication

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11 Fluency: Model Phrasing Listen as I read “Silent Debate.” As I read, notice how I group words into meaningful phrases to help listeners understand the story. Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12 Fluency: Model Phrasing What causes the misunderstandings between the scholar and the boatman? Why does the scholar have the boatman turn the boat around?

13 Concept Vocabulary converse – to talk together in an informal way scholar – a learned person; person having much knowledge symbol – something that stands for or represents something elsesymbol (Next Slide)

14 symbol

15 Concept Vocabulary (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

16 Build Concept Vocabulary Build Concept Vocabulary converse, scholar, symbol WaysPeopleReasons Communication

17 Graphic Sources, Ask Questions Turn to Page

18 Prior Knowledge What do you know about ancient Egyptian writing? K (What do you know?) W (What would you like to learn?) L (What did you learn?)

19 Prior Knowledge This week’s audio explores Egyptian hieroglyphics and how symbols become words. After we listen, we will discuss what you learned and what surprised you most about Egyptian hieroglyphics.

20 Vocabulary Words

21 ancient – of times long past link – anything that joins or connects, as a loop of a chain doeslink scholars – learned people; people having much knowledge seeker – one who tries to find; one who searches

22 Vocabulary Words temple - building used for the service or worship of God or gods temple translate – to change from one language into another triumph – victory; success uncover – to make known; reveal; expose

23 More Words to Know decipher - to change something in cipher or code to ordinary language; decode hieroglyphs – pictures, characters, or symbols standing for words, ideas, or sounds. The ancient Egyptians used hieroglyphs instead of an alphabet like ours.hieroglyphs

24 More Words to Know spellbound – too interested to move; fascinated ( Next Slide ) ( Next Slide )

25 link

26 temple

27 hieroglyphs

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29 we was excited to sea the mummie’s on are museum trip We were excited to see the mummies on our museum trip. one mummy was partly unwrapped so that we seen it’s face One mummy was partly unwrapped so that we saw its face.

30 Pronouns and Antecedents Jean-Francois studied hieroglyphs and learned their secrets. The word their is a possessive pronoun. It is used in place of the possessive noun hieroglyphs.

31 Pronouns and Antecedents Possessive pronouns show who or what owns, or possesses, something. My, mine, your, yours, her, hers, his, its, our, ours, their, and theirs are possessive pronouns.

32 Pronouns and Antecedents Use my, your, her, our, and their before nouns. I study at my desk. Claire read her book. Experts shared their discoveries.

33 Pronouns and Antecedents Use mine, yours, hers, ours, and theirs alone. The desk is mine. The book was hers. The discoveries were theirs.

34 Pronouns and Antecedents His and its can be used both before nouns and alone. Jean-Francois did his work. The work was his. The Egyptian alphabet revealed its secrets. The secrets were its.

35 Pronouns and Antecedents Do not use an apostrophe with a possessive pronoun.

36 Pronouns and Antecedents Pronouns and Antecedents Find the possessive pronoun in each sentence. Ancient Egyptians left many samples of their writing. their The Egyptian alphabet was very different from ours. ours

37 Pronouns and Antecedents Pronouns and Antecedents Find the possessive pronoun in each sentence. Some of its letters were pictures of animals. its Jean-Francois concentrated on his work for years. his

38 Pronouns and Antecedents Pronouns and Antecedents Find the possessive pronoun in each sentence. I have written about him in my research paper. my

39 Pronouns and Antecedents Pronouns and Antecedents Choose the correct possessive pronoun in ( ). (Our, Ours) class is studying ancient Egypt. Our Maria told us about hieroglyphs in (her, hers) oral report. her

40 Pronouns and Antecedents Pronouns and Antecedents Choose the correct possessive pronoun in ( ). Julio and Pam made a model of the Rosetta Stone for (their, theirs) presentation. their I wrote about Jean-Francois Champollion for (my, mine). mine

41 Pronouns and Antecedents Pronouns and Antecedents Choose the correct possessive pronoun in ( ). What will you do for (you, yours)? yours

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43 village except explain quick charge bridge knowledge question equal queen excited expect Texas fudge excellent exercise quart liquid quilt expert expedition aquarium inquire frequent advantage

44 Tuesday Question of the Day Why does Jean Francois care so much about learning a lost language?

45 Today we will learn about: Greek and Latin Roots Graphic Sources Ask Questions Main Idea Vocabulary Fluency: Echo Reading Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Consonants /j/, /ks/, and /kw/ Social Studies: Napoleon Bonaparte Communication

46 Vocabulary Strategy: Greek and Latin Roots Turn to Page

47 Seeker of Knowledge Turn to Page

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49 Fluency: Echo Reading Turn to page 474, paragraph 1. As I read, notice how I use commas and dashes as phrasing cues and how I pronounce foreign names carefully. We will practice as a class doing three echo readings of this paragraph.

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51 what a lot of hieroglyphs there were, how did people learn to read them What a lot of hieroglyphs there were! How did people learn to read them? im glad we read seeker of knowledje before we gone to the museum I’m glad we read Seeker of Knowledge before we went to the museum.

52 Pronouns and Antecedents Possessive pronouns show who or what possesses something. The possessive pronouns my, your, her, our, and their are used before nouns.

53 Pronouns and Antecedents The possessive pronouns mine, yours, hers, ours, and theirs are used alone. Possessive pronouns his and its are used before nouns and alone. Do not use an apostrophe with a possessive pronoun.

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55 village except explain quick charge bridge knowledge question equal queen excited expect Texas fudge excellent exercise quart liquid quilt expert expedition aquarium inquire frequent advantage

56 Wednesday Question of the Day Why was Jean Francois’s discovery important?

57 Today we will learn about: Ask Questions Word Structure Vocabulary Fluency: Phrasing Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Consonants /j/, /ks/, and /kw/ Social Studies: The Rosetta Stone Communication

58 Seeker of Knowledge Turn to Page

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60 Fluency: Model Phrasing Turn to page 477, paragraph 1. As I read, notice that I pause at logical breaks in the text to give listeners a chance to think about meaning. Now we will practice together as a class by doing three echo readings.

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62 if you show me your poster i will show you mines If you show me your poster, I will show you mine. your’s is bigger but I like mine better Yours is bigger, but I like mine better.

63 Pronouns and Antecedents Possessive pronouns show who or what possesses something. The possessive pronouns my, your, her, our, and their are used before nouns.

64 Pronouns and Antecedents The possessive pronouns mine, yours, hers, ours, and theirs are used alone. Possessive pronouns his and its are used before nouns and alone. Do not use an apostrophe with a possessive pronoun.

65 Pronouns and Antecedents Using too many possessive nouns can make writing awkward. Use possessive pronouns whenever possible to make writing smoother. Awkward: John gave me John’s book. Smooth: John gave me his book.

66 Pronouns and Antecedents Review something you have written to see if you can improve it by using possessive pronouns in place of possessive nouns.

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68 village except explain quick charge bridge knowledge question equal queen excited expect Texas fudge excellent exercise quart liquid quilt expert expedition aquarium inquire frequent advantage

69 Thursday Question of the Day What can you learn from graphic symbols that you see today, such as computer icons?

70 Today we will learn about: Search Engines Reading Across Texts Fluency: Partner Reading Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Consonants /j/, /ks/, and /kw/ Social Studies: Create a Code

71 “Word Puzzles” Turn to Page

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73 Fluency: Partner Reading Turn to page 477, paragraph 1. Read this paragraph three times with a partner. Be sure to use logical phrasing. Remember to self-correct and offer each other feedback.

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75 the jackals in the hieroglyphs looks a little like our wolfs The jackals in the hieroglyphs look a little like our wolves. jen and me made a copy of one line of hieroglyphs, it took a long time Jen and I made a copy of one line of hieroglyphs. It took a long time.

76 Pronouns and Antecedents Possessive pronouns show who or what possesses something. The possessive pronouns my, your, her, our, and their are used before nouns.

77 Pronouns and Antecedents The possessive pronouns mine, yours, hers, ours, and theirs are used alone. Possessive pronouns his and its are used before nouns and alone. Do not use an apostrophe with a possessive pronoun.

78 Pronouns and Antecedents Test Tip: It is easy to confuse the possessive pronoun its with the contraction it’s, which means it is. Keep in mind that possessive pronouns never use apostrophes.

79 Pronouns and Antecedents Possessive Pronoun: The bird is in its nest. Contraction: It’s sitting very still. Both: It’s hatching its eggs.

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81 village except explain quick charge bridge knowledge question equal queen excited expect Texas fudge excellent exercise quart liquid quilt expert expedition aquarium inquire frequent advantage

82 Friday Question of the Day How can learning another language create understanding?

83 Today we will learn about: Build Concept Vocabulary Graphic Sources How Art Complements Text Word Structure Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Consonants /j/, /ks/, & /kw/ Thesaurus Communication

84 Graphic Sources A graphic source, such as a picture, a map, or a chart, organizes information and makes it easy to see. You can use a graphic source to help you understand what you read.

85 How Art Complements Text Art enhances and complements text to make reading more enjoyable and understandable. Art can present some information more easily than words.

86 Greek and Latin Roots You can use Greek and Latin roots to help figure out the meanings of some words. The Latin root scrib or scrip means“to write.” Explain how each word in the chart relates to writing.

87 Greek and Latin Roots Words with scrib(e)Words with script describe scribble scribe inscribe subscribe transcribe

88 The hieroglyphs were written on a big rock that sat near a noisy river. Where could you look to find a new, interesting word to replace big in the sentence?

89 Thesaurus A thesaurus is a special dictionary that lists synonyms, antonyms, and other related words in alphabetical order. Some word processing programs include a thesaurus. Synonyms are words with similar meanings.

90 Thesaurus Antonyms are words with opposite meanings. The part of speech tells how the word is used, such as a noun or verb. If an entry word has multiple meanings, synonyms are given for each meaning.

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93 life in ancient egypt must of been very hard Life in ancient Egypt must have been very hard. egyptians used flower with sand in it, this damaged there teeth Egyptians used flour with sand in it. This damaged their teeth.

94 Pronouns and Antecedents Possessive pronouns show who or what possesses something. The possessive pronouns my, your, her, our, and their are used before nouns.

95 Pronouns and Antecedents The possessive pronouns mine, yours, hers, ours, and theirs are used alone. Possessive pronouns his and its are used before nouns and alone. Do not use an apostrophe with a possessive pronoun.

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97 village except explain quick charge bridge knowledge question equal queen excited expect Texas fudge excellent exercise quart liquid quilt expert expedition aquarium inquire frequent advantage

98 Story test Classroom webpage, Reading Test AR Other Reading Quizzes Quiz #


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