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Big Question: How do animals adapt to survive? Author: Joanne Settel Genre: Expository Nonfiction.

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Presentation on theme: "Big Question: How do animals adapt to survive? Author: Joanne Settel Genre: Expository Nonfiction."— Presentation transcript:

1 Big Question: How do animals adapt to survive? Author: Joanne Settel Genre: Expository Nonfiction

2 Small Group Timer Timer

3 Review Games Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

4 Spelling Words Homophones

5 cent sent scent threw through weather whether their there they’re chili chilly tide tied pale pail aloud allowed course coarse counsel council bizarre bazaar patients patience

6 Big Question: How do animals adapt to survive? Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

7 Vocabulary Words critical enables mucus scarce specialize sterile aborigines nauseating predator African black mambas constrictors reptiles Vocabulary Words More Words to Know

8 Monday Question of the Day How do animals adapt to survive?

9 Today we will learn about: Build Concepts Graphic Sources Monitor and Fix Up Build Background Vocabulary Fluency: Tempo and Rate Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Homophones Animal Adaptations

10 Fluency Model Tempo and Rate

11 Fluency: Model Tempo and Rate Listen as I read “Snake Scientist.” As I read, notice how I keep my pace slow and steady and enunciate words that convey scientific information. Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12 Fluency: Model Tempo and Rate What is the author’s purpose for writing “Snake Scientist”? Explain your answer. How are snakes like and unlike dinosaurs?

13 Concept Vocabulary African black mambas – poisonous snakes from Africa that are related to cobrasAfrican black mambas constrictors – snakes that kill prey by crushing it in their coilsconstrictors reptiles – cold-blooded animals with backbones and lungs, usually covered with horny plates or scalesreptiles (Next slide)

14 African black mambas

15 constrictors

16 reptiles

17 Concept Vocabulary (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

18 Build Concept Vocabulary Build Concept Vocabulary African black mambas, constrictors, reptiles Eating Types of Animals Animal Adaptations

19 Graphic Sources, Monitor and Fix Up Turn to Page

20 Prior Knowledge What do you know about ants, owls, and snakes? AntsOwlsSnakes Animals

21 Prior Knowledge This week’s audio explores familiar animal adaptations. After you listen, we will discuss what you found most surprising.

22 Vocabulary Words

23 critical – being important to the outcome of a situation enables – gives ability, power, or means to; makes able mucus – a slimy substance produced in the nose and throat to moisten and protect them

24 Vocabulary Words scarce – hard to get; rare specialize – to develop in a special way sterile – free from germs

25 More Words to Know aborigines – the earliest known inhabitants of Australia aborigines nauseating – sickening; causing nausea predator – animal or person that lives by killing and eating other animalspredator (Next Slide)

26 aborigines

27 predator

28 Grammar Possessive Pronouns

29 a skunk sprays a bad-smelling sent to keep enemys away A skunk sprays a bad-smelling scent to keep enemies away. that serves as there protection That serves as their protection.

30 Possessive Pronouns Animals often put their body parts to good use. Their is a possessive pronoun. It is used in the place of the possessive noun animals’ to show that the animals own, or possess, the body parts.

31 Possessive Pronouns Possessive pronouns show who or what owns, or possesses, something. My, mine, you, yours, her, hers, his, its, our, ours, their, and theirs are possessive pronouns.

32 Possessive Pronouns Use my, your, her, our, and their before nouns. This is my cat. It was her dog. They fed their fish. Use mine, yours, her, ours, and theirs alone. The cat is mine. The dog was hers. The fish are theirs.

33 Possessive Pronouns His and its can be used both before nouns and alone. He found his dog. The dog is his. The dog hurt its paw. The paw is its. Do not use an apostrophe with a possessive pronoun.

34 Possessive Pronouns Possessive Pronouns Choose the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence. Ants use (theirs, their) antennae for touch and smell. their That nest under the tree is (their, theirs). theirs

35 Possessive Pronouns Possessive Pronouns Choose the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence. An ant has two stomachs in (its, our) abdomen. its One stomach stores food for other ants to share, and another stomach holds (it’s, its) own food. its

36 Possessive Pronouns Possessive Pronouns Choose the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence. The queen is larger than the other ants, and (her, hers) body is an egg a factory. her All the worker ants are sterile, so the egg-laying task is all (her, hers). hers

37 Possessive Pronouns Possessive Pronouns Choose the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence. A male ant lives apart from the colony and plays (his, theirs) part by mating with the queen. his I sometimes get ants in (my, hers) house. my

38 Possessive Pronouns Possessive Pronouns Choose the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence. The house with purple trim is (my, mine) mine

39 Spelling Words Homophones

40 cent sent scent threw through weather whether their there they’re chili chilly tide tied pale pail aloud allowed course coarse counsel council bizarre bazaar patients patience

41 Tuesday Question of the Day What animal ways of eating and finding shelter seem especially gross?

42 Today we will learn about: Vocabulary Strategy Lesson: Context Clues Graphic Organizers Author’s Purpose Vocabulary Fluency: Echo Reading Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Homophones Time for Science: Biomes Animal Adaptations

43 Vocabulary Strategy: Context Clues Turn to Page

44 Exploding Ants Turn to Page

45 Fluency Echo Reading

46 Fluency: Echo Reading Turn to page 444, paragraphs 2 and 3. As I read, notice how I adjust my rate for scientific words, such as repletes and regurgitates. We will practice as a class doing three echo readings of this paragraph.

47 Grammar Possessive Pronouns

48 because clear scales cover the eyes of a snake. It’s eyes are always open Because clear scales cover the eyes of a snake, its eyes are always open. snakes raises there body temperature by laying in the sun Snakes raise their body temperature by lying in the sun.

49 Possessive Pronouns Possessive pronouns show who or what owns something. My, your, her, our, and their are used before nouns. Mine, yours, hers, ours, and theirs are used alone.

50 Possessive Pronouns His and its can be used both before nouns and alone. No possessive pronoun uses an apostrophe.

51 Spelling Words Homophones

52 cent sent scent threw through weather whether their there they’re chili chilly tide tied pale pail aloud allowed course coarse counsel council bizarre bazaar patients patience

53 Wednesday Question of the Day How does the ability of a snake to gulp down prey larger than itself help it survive?

54 Today we will learn about: Graphic Sources Monitor and Fix Up Vocabulary Fluency: Tempo and Rate Grammar: Possessives Pronouns Spelling: Homophones Time for Science: Human Adaptations Animal Adaptations

55 Exploding Ants Turn to Page

56 Fluency Tempo and Rate

57 Fluency: Tempo and Rate Turn to page 446. As I read, notice that I enunciate the words mandibular glands and mandibles that convey scientific information. Now we will practice together as a class by doing three echo readings.

58 Grammar Possessive Pronouns

59 there are a snake under that chair There is a snake under that chair! that is mine snake named sue That is my snake named Sue.

60 Possessive Pronouns Possessive pronouns show who or what owns something. My, your, her, our, and their are used before nouns. Mine, yours, hers, ours, and theirs are used alone.

61 Possessive Pronouns His and its can be used both before nouns and alone. No possessive pronoun uses an apostrophe.

62 Possessive Pronouns The contraction it’s stands for the words it is and is never used to show possession. No possessive pronoun uses an apostrophe.

63 Possessive Pronouns No: Its a shame that owl broke it’s wing. Yes: It’s a shame that owl broke its wing.

64 Possessive Pronouns Review something you have written to see if you can improve it by correcting mistakes in your use of possessive pronouns.

65 Spelling Words Homophones

66 cent sent scent threw through weather whether their there they’re chili chilly tide tied pale pail aloud allowed course coarse counsel council bizarre bazaar patients patience

67 Thursday Question of the Day What adaptations do you think humans would have to undergo if they lived like fish in an underwater environment?

68 Today we will learn about: Experiment Reading Across Texts Content-Area Vocabulary Fluency: Partner Reading Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Homophones Time for Science: Animal Experiments

69 “The Creature from the Adapting Lagoon” Turn to Page

70 Fluency Partner Reading

71 Fluency: Partner Reading Turn to page 446. Read this page three times with a partner. Be sure to read slowly and confidently. Offer each other feedback.

72 Grammar Possessive Pronouns

73 on saturday morning you can bring you dog for training On Saturday morning, you can bring your dog for training. dogs are allways aloud in the pet store Dogs are always allowed in the pet store.

74 Possessive Pronouns Possessive pronouns show who or what owns something. My, your, her, our, and their are used before nouns. Mine, yours, hers, ours, and theirs are used alone.

75 Possessive Pronouns His and its can be used both before nouns and alone. No possessive pronoun uses an apostrophe.

76 Possessive Pronouns Test Tip: Although possessive nouns use an apostrophe (Jean’s dog), possessive pronouns never do (her dog). No: A dog loves it’s owner. Yes: A dog loves its owner. No: That dog is her’s. Yes: That dog is hers.

77 Spelling Words Homophones

78 cent sent scent threw through weather whether their there they’re chili chilly tide tied pale pail aloud allowed course coarse counsel council bizarre bazaar patients patience

79 Friday Question of the Day How do animals adapt to survive?

80 Today we will learn about: Build Concept Vocabulary Graphic Sources Context Clues Grammar: Possessive Pronouns Spelling: Homophones Magazine/Periodical Animal Adaptations

81 Graphic Sources A graphic source, such as a picture, diagram, or chart, organizes information and makes it easy to see. Preview the graphic sources in a selection to help you predict what you will be reading about. As you read, compare the information in the text with the graphic source.

82 Metaphor A metaphor is a comparison between two unlike things that are alike in at least one way. In a metaphor, the similarity is implied—not stated using words of comparison. A metaphor calls attention to certain qualities of one or both things being compared.

83 Context Clues context clues Use context clues to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words. Choose an unfamiliar word from Exploding Ants and complete a word frame for it. Base your predicted definitions on context clues from the selection and write sentences using the word in similar contexts. Use a dictionary to write exact definitions.

84 Context Clues Word: Predicted definition: One good sentence: Verified definition: Another good sentence: Dictionary Definition:

85 Name reference sources where you might locate new research about animals.

86 Magazine/Periodical periodical A periodical is a magazine that contains current information in the form of articles, opinion columns, letters, reports, advertisements, and reviews. headlinetitle The headline or title expresses the topic of the article.

87 Magazine/Periodical Table of Contents Most magazines include a Table of Contents which tells the reader what information is in the magazine and where to find it. 5 Ws and How Most magazines follow the 5 Ws and How format. The article will tell you Who? What? When? Where? Why? and How?

88

89 Grammar Possessive Pronouns

90 that fish is pail so it will blend in with the sandy ocean botem That fish is pale so it will blend in with the sandy ocean bottom. Animals bodys and behaviors are adapted to its environments Animals’ bodies and behaviors are adapted to their environments.

91 Possessive Pronouns Possessive pronouns show who or what owns something. My, your, her, our, and their are used before nouns. Mine, yours, hers, ours, and theirs are used alone.

92 Possessive Pronouns His and its can be used both before nouns and alone. No possessive pronoun uses an apostrophe.

93 Spelling Words Homophones

94 cent sent scent threw through weather whether their there they’re chili chilly tide tied pale pail aloud allowed course coarse counsel council bizarre bazaar patients patience

95 Story test ◦ Classroom webpage, ◦ Reading Test AR ◦ Other Reading Quizzes ◦ Quiz #


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