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ASSC School Climate Assessment Instrument (SCAI) Results and Initial Reflections and Recommendations Lincoln High School April 13, 2013 Alliance for the.

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Presentation on theme: "ASSC School Climate Assessment Instrument (SCAI) Results and Initial Reflections and Recommendations Lincoln High School April 13, 2013 Alliance for the."— Presentation transcript:

1 ASSC School Climate Assessment Instrument (SCAI) Results and Initial Reflections and Recommendations Lincoln High School April 13, 2013 Alliance for the Study of School Climate (ASSC)

2 Think about when you were a student: 1.List and describe the characteristics of and strategies used by your best/favorite teacher. 2.List and describe the characteristics of and strategies used by your worst teacher. Journal – 5 minutes (T-Chart)

3 1.Physical Appearance 2.Faculty Relations 3.Student Interactions 4.Leadership and Decision-Making 5.Discipline Environment 6.Learning and Assessment 7.Attitude and Culture 8.Community Relations School Climate: The Eight Dimensions used in the ASSC SCAI

4 School Climate Score (SCAI) by Student Achievement (CA API) API – Student Achievement Scores School Climate Rating

5 Level 3Level 2Level 1 System IntentionalSemi-intentionalAccidental Ethos Sound vision translated into effective practice Good intentions translated into practices that “work.” Practices defined by the relative self- interest of faculty and staff Perceptual Control Theory Level System/PrincipleProgramSensory Effect on Students Liberating Experience changes students for the better Perpetuating Experience has a mixed effect on students Domesticating Experience has a net negative effect on students Staff relations CollaborativeCongenialCompetitive Psychological Outcome Promotes a Psychology of Success Promotes a Mixed Psychology Promotes a Psychology of Failure School Climate Levels

6 A Psychology of Success (POS) Successful schools (3 level) have a “psychology of success” that pervades every aspect of the school. The Core of a Sound and Healthy School Climate: Success Psychology (POS)Failure Psychology (POF) Internal Locus of ControlExternal Locus of Control Belonging & AcceptanceAlienation and Worthlessness Growth-OrientationFixed-Ability Orientation

7 A Psychology of Success (POS) Jigsaw and Gallery Walk (See Directions) Promoting Growth Versus Fixed Ability Orientation ( ) Sense of Belonging and Acceptance Within the Class ( ) Promoting an Internal Locus of Control ( ) Shindler, J. (2010). Transformative Classroom Management: Positive Strategies to Engage All Students and Promote a Psychology of Success. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

8 A Psychology of Success (POS) Jigsaw Directions 1.Divide teachers into groups of Teachers are assigned different sections to read: Promoting Growth Versus Fixed Ability Orientation ( ) Growth Ability Fixed Ability Sense of Belonging and Acceptance Within the Class ( ) Promoting an Internal Locus of Control ( ) External Locus of Control Internal Locus of Control 3.In groups, summarize section (gist statement 63 words) on chart paper and list characteristics of a classroom that possesses an internal locus of control, external locus of control, sense of belonging and acceptance, growth ability, and fixed ability. Shindler, J. (2010). Transformative Classroom Management: Positive Strategies to Engage All Students and Promote a Psychology of Success. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

9 A Psychology of Success (POS) Gallery Walk Directions Rotate around the library visiting each station. On the graphic organizer, add more characteristics to the display using post-its and list characteristics from display on to your graphic organizer. Rotation will occur every 5 minutes. Shindler, J. (2010). Transformative Classroom Management: Positive Strategies to Engage All Students and Promote a Psychology of Success. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

10 A Psychology of Success (POS) - Journal 1. Explain how your favorite teacher promoted a Psychology of Success (POS) and how your worst teacher promoted a Psychology of Failure (POF)? 2.Describe how you promote a sense of POS in your classroom.

11 Attitude Defined by: Moving Up or Down the Continuum Intentional Awareness Internal LOC Accidental Unaware External LOC

12 1.Clarity 2.Consistency 3.Pedagogy that supports your goals 4.Basic Needs satisfying environment 5.Social Bonds 6.Teach and practice your management 7.Psychology of Success 8.Leader, not manager 9.Community Moving Up the Continuum

13 1.Relying on Bribes and Gimmicks (extra credit, candies, classroom dollars, etc.) 2.Incorporating negative strategies (disappointment, lectures, putdowns) 3.Punishment and “pain-based” logic (detention during lunch, “do you want extra work”, etc.) 4.Intermingling the personal and the performance (you’re lazy so your failing, These students are lazy, its their parents fault, etc.) 5.Involving those that were not involved (calling parents, sending student to dean, etc.) Moving Down the Continuum

14 Self Evaluation Reflect on the strategies you use in your classroom and check the strategies that you use often in you classroom on the handout.

15 High Function/Intentional Internal Locus of Control Student-CenteredTeacher-Centered 1-Style Functional/Student-Centered Facilitator/Leader Self-Directed Students “Our Class” 2-Style Functional/Teacher-Centered Conductor /Manager Well Trained Students “My Class” 3-Style Dysfunctional/Student-Centered Enabler/Passive Self-Centered/Chaos “The Students” 4-Style Dysfunctional/Teacher-Centered Authoritarian/Hostile Dominance/Obedience or Rebellion “Those Students” Low Function/Accidental External Locus of Control Teaching Style Matrix – Orientation by Function Level

16 High Function/Intentional Internal Locus of Control Student-CenteredTeacher-Centered Style 4 2-Style Style Style Low Function/Accidental External Locus of Control SCAI School Climate Ratings, and Corresponding Predicted API Score Correlations by Teaching Practice

17 High Function/Intentional Internal Locus of Control Student-CenteredTeacher-Centered Style 4 2-Style Style Style Low Function/Accidental External Locus of Control SCAI School Climate Ratings, and Corresponding Predicted API Score Correlations by Specific Teaching Practice – LHS 685/3.44

18 Steps for Improvement Changes in practice that will get us the most positive outcomes for the least effort 1.Stop 1.Stop trusting what has not worked Expectations 2.Create Shared Expectations technical management 3.Promote consistent and effective technical management social contracts 4.Develop social contracts and student ownership of rules challenging students 5.Effectively working with the most challenging students connectedness 6.Recognize connectedness – (i.e., to instructional and assessment choices) 7.Assess Process/Investment 7.Assess Process/Investment – systematically and deliberately

19 LHS SCAI Teacher Rating by Dimension

20 Teacher Ratings Range Community Relations (Dimension 8) Student Interactions (Dimension 3) Physical Environment (Dimension 1) Leadership (Dimension 4) Overall Faculty Relations (Dimension 2) Learning/Assessment (Dimension 6) Attitude/Culture (Dimension 7) Management/Discipline (Dimension 5)3.25

21 LHS SCAI Student Rating by Dimension

22 Student Ratings Range Community Relations (Dimension 8) Management/Discipline (Dimension 5) Overall Physical Environment (Dimension 1) Student Interactions (Dimension 3) Learning/Assessment (Dimension 6) Attitude/Culture (Dimension 7)3.20

23 1.Physical Appearance 2.Faculty Relations 3.Student Interactions 4.Leadership and Decision-Making 5.Discipline Environment 6.Learning and Assessment 7.Attitude and Culture 8.Community Relations School Climate: The Eight Dimensions used in the ASSC SCAI

24 LHS SCAI Teacher Rating by Dimension

25 Dimension 5-Discipline Environment Explanation: Examines the relationship between the management and discipline approaches used within the school and the climate that is created as a result. This dimension includes the degree to which management strategies promote higher levels of responsibility and motivation. It also examines teacher-student interactions as a source of management and motivation. Question Topics: Consistency of Discipline Policy2.78 Student-Generated Ideas for Rules2.91 Clear Expectation of Discipline Policy2.93 Promotion of Student Self-Direction3.17 Promotion of Community in Class3.19 Teacher-Student Supportive Interaction3.36 Discipline for Functionality3.40 Classroom Climate3.50 Effective Discipline3.61 Focus on Problematic Behavior3.63

26 Teacher and Learning Frameworks

27 Standard 2: Classroom Environment a. Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport 1. Teacher Interaction with Students 2. Student Interactions with One Another 3. Classroom Climate b. Establishing a Culture for Learning 1. Importance of the Content 2. Expectations for Learning and Achievement 3. Student Ownership of their Work 4. Physical Environment c. Managing Classroom Procedures 1. Management of Routines, Procedures, and Transitions 2. Management of Materials and Supplies 3. Performance of Non-Instructional Duties 4. Management of Parent Leaders, other Volunteers and Paraprofessionals d. Managing Student Behavior 1. Expectations for Behavior 2. Monitoring and Responding to Student Behavior

28 Teacher and Learning Frameworks- Jigsaw Jigsaw Directions 1.Divide teachers into groups of 5. (Summary Group) 2.Teachers are assigned different sections to read in Standard 2: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport (2a1 & 2a3) Establishing a Culture for Learning (2b2) Managing Classroom Procedures (2c1) Managing Student Behavior (2d2) 3.Expert Groups (Teacher and Learning Frameworks-Danielson) 2a1 Teacher Interaction with Students (Martinez)Room 154 2a3 Classroom Climate (Lara)Room 155 2b2 Expectations for Learning Achievement (Rosas)Room 159 2c1 Management of Routines, Procedures, and Transitions (Nava)Room 157 2d2 Monitoring and Responding to Student Behavior (Robinson)Room Summary Group Meeting Work with your summary groups to complete graphic organizer and develop clear expectations for our staff

29 Welcome Back to Summary Groups Work with your Summary Groups to complete the “Matrix for Level 3 Schools with Style 1 Teachers” graphic organizer and create clear expectations for all teachers at Lincoln High School.

30 Next Steps Self Reflection Conversations around data and strategies Professional Development tailored around your suggestion and needs


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