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Transformative Classroom Management Webinar #7 of 12 Creating a Social Contract and Logical Consequences Virginia Department of Education Office of School.

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Presentation on theme: "Transformative Classroom Management Webinar #7 of 12 Creating a Social Contract and Logical Consequences Virginia Department of Education Office of School."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Transformative Classroom Management Webinar #7 of 12 Creating a Social Contract and Logical Consequences Virginia Department of Education Office of School Improvement

3 Transformative Classroom Management Series Series of Twelve Sessions Facilitator and Participant Guide Clips of Skills in Practice Other Resources Virginia Department of Education Website

4 VDOE Guidelines for Uniform Performance Standards and Evaluation Criteria for Teachers Offers professional development for Performance Standard 5: Learning Environment

5 Transformative Classroom Management (TCM) Professional Development Series 1.Data shows Transformation Classroom Practices Increase Achievement 2.Moving up the Function Continuum 3.Classroom Environment and Social Learning 4.Creating Clear and Effective Classroom Expectations 5.The Technical Management of a Classroom 6. Motivating Students to Learn 7.Creating a Class Social Contract and Logical Consequences 8.Implementing a Consequence and Dealing with Power Struggles 9.Instruction – Assessment - Management Connection 10.Facilitating Effective Cooperative Learning 11.Succeeding with Challenging Students 12.Creating the 1-Style Classroom

6 Purpose The purpose of the seventh webinar is to: 1.Explore the nature of social bonds among the students in a class 2.Examine a system for facilitating the process of creating a social contract within the class

7 Presenter - John Shindler Dr. John Shindler is a Professor of Education at California State University, Los Angeles, and the Director of the Alliance for the Study of School Climate.

8 Todays Agenda 1.Welcome and reflections from webinar six 2.Understanding the nature of social bonds and building a process for creating a social contract within the class 3.Understand the difference between consequences and punishments 4.Reflections and Activities (See TCM Guidebook)

9 Why do your students do as you ask? Why do they treat each other well? What bonds them? –Social –Communal Where do those bonds exist? And how will/do we see evidence of them? The Bonds in our Class

10 What are your goals for your class as a unit/collective? What is your system of rules and consequences? Where is it all going for you? –To a simple recognition that there are rules and consequences? –Toward increased responsibility? –Toward a long-term goal (i.e., community, or self- direction)? What is our Class as a Collective?

11 What is the difference between a rule and a generally accepted classroom expectation? Will you have rules in your class? You have dozens of expectations, how will you communicate those? (refer to webinar four) What will you put in written form? How will you feel confident that your students know your rules and expectations? Rules vs. Expectations

12 What is the difference between a social contract and teacher imposed rules? 1.A social contract is an explicit agreement among participants – rules are imposed upon participants. 2.A social contract is developed by participants – rules are given by the teacher. 3.A social contract exists in the hearts and minds of the participants – rules exit on the wall. Social Contract

13 Few Rules (and constant clarification of the many expectations) Positively Stated Student Involvement Logical and Related Consequences Your Role? Creating Your Social Contract

14 What is your role in the collective of your class(es)? Are you... –The Enforcer? –The Boss? –The Parent? –The Facilitator? –The Watch Maker? –The Leader? –The Cheerleader? –Other? What is your Role?

15 What do we do when students break rules, cross boundaries, violate expectations? What if we do nothing - what is the problem? What if we are inconsistent - what is the problem? Consequences

16 Reflect on the story of Student and Bus What is the nature of a consequence? The nature of a punishment? –LOC? –Long-term effects? –Influence on behavior change? Consequences vs. Punishments

17 Consequences vs. Punishments: A Comparison ConsequencesPunishments Intend to teach lessonsIntend to give discomfort Foster internal locus of controlFoster external locus of control Are proactiveAre reactive Are logical and relatedAre unrelated and personal Work in the long-termWork in the short-term Promote responsibilityCan promote obedience (but more likely resentment)

18 Case Example Teacher reviews with the students. After a few minutes, the teacher hears talking. He tells them, There is too much talking right now. After a couple of minutes, talking continues so he tells them, If you keep talking I am going to give you the test. After a few minutes the teacher again becomes frustrated with the amount of talking and says, Thats it, you are getting the test now! As he passes out the test he angrily tells the students that if they talk during the exam, they will get a big fat 0! Where are the consequences in this intervention and where are the punishments? What could the teacher have done differently? Sometimes it is not the what but the how that defines things.

19 If students are used to crime and punishment and punitive kinds of interventions, what does that imply for us? Should we give them what they are used to (and probably respond most compliantly to)? If we do, are we promoting their negative identities and failure psychologies? What should we do instead? What are Our Student Used to?What are Our Student Used to?

20 1-Style Functional/Student-Centered Facilitator/Leader Self-Directed Students Our Class 2-Style Functional/Teacher-Centered Conductor /Manager Well-Trained Students My Class 3-Style Dysfunctional/Student-Centered Enabler/Passive Self-Centered/Chaos The Students 4-Style Dysfunctional/Teacher-Centered Authoritarian/Hostile Dominance/Obedience or Rebellion Those Students Functional level by Orientation 4 Quadrant Teaching Style Matrix

21 Level of ProblemDescription Level IStudents do things that reflect unconscious mistakes, bad habits, laziness, bad judgments. They are not serious, but if ignored will grow. Level IIStudents consciously violate rules and expectations, or exhibit a pattern of deeply conditioned dysfunctional behavior. Level IIIStudent come to us with organic problems with attention or emotional control. Levels of ProblemsLevels of Problems

22 Upcoming TCM Webinars The next webinar in the series provides an explanation of how to implement the social contract and its consequences and what to do if a student were to reject the contract. 1.Data shows Transformation Classroom Practices Increase Achievement 2.Moving up the Function Continuum 3.Classroom Environment and Social Learning 4.Creating Clear and Effective Classroom Expectations 5.The Technical Management of a Classroom 6.Motivating Students to Learn 7.Creating a Class Social Contract and Logical Consequences 8.Implementing a Consequence and Dealing with Power Struggles 9.Instruction – Assessment - Management Connection 10.Facilitating Effective Cooperative Learning 11.Succeeding with Challenging Students 12.Creating the 1-Style Classroom

23 References Shindler, J. (2010) Transformative Classroom Management. Jossey-Bass. San Francisco, CA


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