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May 16, 2009. Overview 1.Questions 2.Our Data 1.Oxford Classical Dictionary 2.Inventory of Poleis 3.What is ArcGIS? 4.First Layer: Cities and Topography.

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Presentation on theme: "May 16, 2009. Overview 1.Questions 2.Our Data 1.Oxford Classical Dictionary 2.Inventory of Poleis 3.What is ArcGIS? 4.First Layer: Cities and Topography."— Presentation transcript:

1 May 16, 2009

2 Overview 1.Questions 2.Our Data 1.Oxford Classical Dictionary 2.Inventory of Poleis 3.What is ArcGIS? 4.First Layer: Cities and Topography 5.Second Layer: Regions 6.Third Layer: People 7.Fourth Layer: Movement

3 Sample Questions 1.Where do people of a particular endeavor tend to congregate? 2.Which cities attracted the most “famous” people? 3.Which regions had the most well-known cities?

4 Oxford Classical Dictionary Edited by Simon Hornblower and Antony Spawforth. List of thousands of famous Greek and Roman citizens (as well as books, ideas, mythical figures, wars, etc.)

5 Thrasybulus (d. 388 BC) son of Lycus, Athenian general and statesman. From the deme of Steiria. In 411 he was a leader of the democratic state formed by the navy at Samos in opposition to the Four Hundred. He was responsible for the recall of Alcibiades and contributed largely to the naval success of the following years. He was banished by the Thirty Tyrants and fled to Thebes where he organized a band of 70 exiles and occupied Phyle (late autumn, 404). When his followers had increased to a thousand, he seized the Piraeus and defeated the troops of the Thirty. Thanks to an amnesty proclaimed at the instance of Sparta, he led his men to Athens, and the democracy was restored. During the Corinthian War he played a prominent part in reviving Athenian imperialism, and in 389/8 he commanded a fleet which gained many allies but suffered from lack of financial support. At Aspendus his troops plundered the natives, who murdered him in his tent. Thrasybulus showed ability and gallantry as a military leader. He was a staunch champion of democracy but was wise enough to make concessions in order to restore Athenian unity. In his last years he failed to appreciate that the imperialistic policy to which he gave his support was far beyond the material resources of Athens at the time. Oxford Classical Dictionary

6 An Inventory of Archaic and Classical Poleis An Investigation Conducted by The Copenhagen Polis Centre for the Danish National Research Foundation By Mogens Herman Hansen and Thomas Heine Nielsen

7 An Inventory of Archaic and Classical Poleis Epidauros (Epidaurios) Map 58. Lat , long Size of territory: 2? Type: A. (S3). The toponym is επιδαυρος (Thuc , ;PS.-Skylax 46), distinguished from its famous homonym in the Argolid by the addition of η Αιμηρα (Thuc , ; cf. Strabo 8.61: ν Αιμηρα, ‘Επιδαηρος, citing Artemidoros). The city ethnic is ‘Επιδαύριος, restored in IG v … for the attribution to Epidauros Limera…and occurs on votives from the Hyperteleaton…In a proxeny decree of one of the poleis of Keos. Epidauros is called a polis in the urban sense by Ps.-Skylax 46 the first references to it as a polis in the political sense are Hellenistic. The proxeny decree from Keos is the only example of the external individual use of the city- ethnic. Ps.-Skylax 46 lists the city under Αακεδαιμων εθνος… its territory is not directly named, but Thucydides refers to it being ravaged by the Athenians. It is presumed to have been a perioikic polis; in Thuc an attack upon it is an attack upon the Lakedaimonians. Its C2 boundary dispute with Zarax is recorded in IG v (supra); in Paus its territory matches with that of Boia (no. 237). According to Paus, Epidauros Limera was founded by envoys from Asklepieion of Argolic Epidauros. If true, this would imply a date after c Pausianias records various features in the town and its territory ( ). The fortificaiton walls on the acropolis may be C5 in part, with an extension possibly in C4m. The fortified area enclosed the lower town was probably much more extensive.

8 Excel Spreadsheets

9

10 What is ArcGIS? ArcGIS is a software program that plots datapoints in 3D space. Its all about layers of data

11 Excel SpreadsheetsContinent OutlineRegions

12

13 First Layer: Cities and Topography Epidauros (Epidaurios) Map 58. Lat , long Size of territory: 2? Type: A. (S3). The toponym is επιδαυρος (Thuc , ;PS.-Skylax 46), distinguished from its famous homonym in the Argolid by the addition of η Αιμηρα (Thuc , ; cf. Strabo 8.61: ν Αιμηρα, ‘Επιδαηρος, citing Artemidoros). The city ethnic is ‘Επιδαύριος, restored in IG v … for the attribution to Epidauros Limera…and occurs on votives from the Hyperteleaton…In a proxeny decree of one of the poleis of Keos. Epidauros is called a polis in the urban sense by Ps.-Skylax 46 the first references to it as a polis in the political sense are Hellenistic. The proxeny decree from Keos is the only example of the external individual use of the city- ethnic. Ps.-Skylax 46 lists the city under Αακεδαιμων εθνος… its territory is not directly named, but Thucydides refers to it being ravaged by the Athenians. It is presumed to have been a perioikic polis; in Thuc an attack upon it is an attack upon the Lakedaimonians. Its C2 boundary dispute with Zarax is recorded in IG v (supra); in Paus its territory matches with that of Boia (no. 237). According to Paus, Epidauros Limera was founded by envoys from Asklepieion of Argolic Epidauros. If true, this would imply a date after c Pausianias records various features in the town and its territory ( ). The fortificaiton walls on the acropolis may be C5 in part, with an extension possibly in C4m. The fortified area enclosed the lower town was probably much more extensive.

14 First Layer: Cities and Topography 1,360 total cities 1,016 Greek Poleis 344 Roman Cities

15 First Layer: Cities and Topography

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17 Second Layer: Regions

18

19 Third Layer: People Thrasybulus (d. 388 BC) son of Lycus, Athenian general and statesman. From the deme of Steiria. In 411 he was a leader of the democratic state formed by the navy at Samos in opposition to the Four Hundred. He was responsible for the recall of Alcibiades and contributed largely to the naval success of the following years. He was banished by the Thirty Tyrants and fled to Thebes where he organized a band of 70 exiles and occupied Phyle (late autumn, 404). When his followers had increased to a thousand, he seized the Piraeus and defeated the troops of the Thirty. Thanks to an amnesty proclaimed at the instance of Sparta, he led his men to Athens, and the democracy was restored. During the Corinthian War he played a prominent part in reviving Athenian imperialism, and in 389/8 he commanded a fleet which gained many allies but suffered from lack of financial support. At Aspendus his troops plundered the natives, who murdered him in his tent. Thrasybulus showed ability and gallantry as a military leader. He was a staunch champion of democracy but was wise enough to make concessions in order to restore Athenian unity. In his last years he failed to appreciate that the imperialistic policy to which he gave his support was far beyond the material resources of Athens at the time.

20 ThirdLayer: People Primary Name Secondary Name Father’s Name Birthplace Birth Code Certainty of Birthplace Work/Living Place Work/Living Code Endeavor Endeavor Code Latitude Longitude Region Region_ID Count_Region Count_City Era Century City_Fame Person_Fame Thrasybulus [NONE] Lycus Athens Athens 361 General Attika NA

21 ThirdLayer: People

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24 Fourth Layer: Movement

25 What new variables could we add to poleis? Athenian empire member amount of tribute. Peloponnesian League member Persian empire dependency Koinon member Port or landlocked Decrees in Rhodes/Lewis Supra-local religious shrine, festival, oracle, etc. Victories in each of the Panathenaic festivals Date of coinage adoption Number of major changes in coin type over time Treasury at Delphi Taxation Structures

26 What new variables could we add to poleis? Elevation Rainfall Crops Mineral Resources

27 Limitations of Data Accuracy of Latitude/Longitude of less well attested locations Empty Cells (no birthplace, etc.) Classical vs. Hellenistic people/places recorded differently


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