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PE 416. What is the difference between a PE curriculum & program?

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Presentation on theme: "PE 416. What is the difference between a PE curriculum & program?"— Presentation transcript:

1 PE 416

2 What is the difference between a PE curriculum & program?

3 Planned sequence of (1) what students are to learn, (2) how students acquire that learning, and (3) how students learning is verified. Non-instructional mechanisms that organize and support physical education

4 Need to have a Vision for the future Should reflect Mission of district Typically already included in the curriculum See Bristols program description What are some of your professional program goals? Again, typically in the curriculum

5 Schedules Teachers and Students Policies and Procedures

6 Steps: 1. Identify the most desirable grouping patterns 2. Determine class size 3. Determine appropriate time allotments for daily, weekly, and unit instruction 4. Determine staffing patterns and teacher loads, and assign teachers 5. Identify teaching stations and equipment 6. Develop a schedule

7 1) Identify the most desirable grouping patterns Homogeneous – grouped by similar traits Individual grades – Often the case K-8. In high school, may also be by individual grades or groups of grades, 9-10 for example. Assigning by individual grades is more conducive to an aligned and progressive PE curriculum Heterogeneous – dissimilar attributes in a group, more random selection Some high schools do not group students by and therefore, students in grades 9-12 may appear on one class roster. This makes is difficult to develop and aligned and progressive curriculum Could you image students in grades 9-12 being placed into one math course every year in high? Of course not, yet in PE we tolerate this arrangement when we should not! We have standards to meet just like any other discipline. Let your opinion be heard.

8 1) Identify the most desirable grouping patterns Elective – Students register for activities or groups of related activities Activity categories: fitness, rhythms, invasion games (hand, feet, hands and feet), net/wall games (net-dual, net-team, wall), field games, target games, aquatics, outdoor pursuits, combatives/gymnastics See next slide

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10 2. Determine class size NASPE has provided stated maximum recommended class sizes for the three primary grade levels ES: 25, MS: 30, HS: 35 In Connecticut and the Northeast, we are lucky. Class sizes are similar to other subjects. However, in California and the Southeast, class sizes range from per teacher! In an elective program, you will have a greater ability to regulate class sizes.

11 2. Determine class size NASPE: How to Teach Large Class Sizes Be careful about combining classes (lead & assistant) b/c this may give administration the impression only 1 teacher is needed. Includes class size recommendations Class size is a big issue in PE with which many states are struggling. We have permitted this instructional impediment for too long. Texas position statement on large class size In 1986 and 1987, the US House and Senate passed a concurrent resolution supporting daily PE for all students Con. Res. 145

12 3. Determine appropriate time allotments for daily, weekly, and unit instruction Instructional periods totaling 150 minutes per week (elementary) and 225 minutes per week (middle and secondary school) The tendency among teachers is to create units with too few lessons. This is often due to disparate student skills levels resulting from a lack of assessment/accountability and not utilizing the five levels of game-play (1-5) This leads to doing the same thing year after year Moderate depth v. breadth You dont really have a lot of time 45 minutes – 15 = 30 minutes; Classes twice per cycle, 30 cycles per year = 60 classes; Subtract 10% for lost instructional days = 54 classes; 54 classes X 30 minutes = 1620 minutes

13 4) Determine staffing patterns and teacher loads, and assign teachers Some activities with inherent risk such as aquatics, gymnastics, skiing, or adventure may required teachers to have specialized training and/or certification. Aquatics – WSI and lifeguarding (American Red Cross) Adventure – offered through organizations such as Project Adventure ® (http://www.pa.org/workshops/browse.php) and othershttp://www.pa.org/workshops/browse.php

14 5) Identify teaching stations and equipment Stations may include: gym (preferably with visual and acoustic dividers), fitness center, multipurpose room (dance, group exercise, etc – can just be an empty traditional classroom near the gym), pool, Outdoor facilities dont really count b/c part of the year they are unusable due to the cold and periodically due to the weather. Do not allow administrators or those devising the master (school) schedule to count them. Availability of equipment should not limit the number of classes in a period but may impact the selection of activities in a class period. For example, if you only have enough equipment for one class of archery, thats all you may offer (no-brainer)

15 6. Develop a schedule Considerations: Two classes must not be scheduled in the same facility at the same time Class sizes must not exceed the legal maximum established for a space A teacher must not be assigned to teacher two classes at the same time Each teacher should be assigned a preparation period Avoid calling it a free period :)

16 6. Develop a schedule Considerations: Units should be assigned to teachers based on their individual skills and interests. Teachers should strive to have the skills necessary to teach MOST activities offered in a curriculum. If only one teacher can teach yoga or personal defense, then classes in which a teacher has a prep period will not be able to select those offerings More difficult at high school due to the range of activities Time should be planned for all teachers in the department to meet together for departmental meetings at least once a cycle (week or 6 day). After school is not a good time due to coaching Mornings can be an alternative

17 6. Develop a schedule The schedule must be developed as outlined in the curriculum. For example, if the curriculum specifies that golf classes start in the 10 th grade, several teachers and periods must be assigned in accordance. Category system: ClassTeam SpIndiv. SpFitnessAquatics Soph.3111 Junior231 Senior141

18 Flexible Scheduling: length, number of classes per week, and total number of class periods per semester/session Modular scheduling Block scheduling See NASPE resource paper on block scheduling May have to plan and Health and PE program together Farmington example

19 Be mindful of NASPE Position Papers ition-papers.html ition-papers.html Appropriate Maximum Class Length for Elementary Physical Education 2008 NEW!! Appropriate Maximum Class Length for Elementary Physical Education 2008 Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs 2008 Physical Education Teacher Evaluation Tool, 2007 [ pdf ] [ doc ]pdfdoc What Constitutes a Highly Qualified Physical Education Teacher, 2007 Opposing Substitution and Waiver/Exemptions for Required Physical Education, 2006 Recess for Elementary School Students, 2006 Position on Dodgeball in Physical Education, 2006 Appropriate Practices for High School (2004), MS (2001), and ES (2000) PE What Constitutes a Quality Physical Education Program, 2003 Physical Activity and Fitness Recommendations for Physical Activity Professionals, 2002 Many others

20 Be Aware of Help in Our Field Shape of the Nation Report (2006) (Free PDF Version) Shape of the Nation Report (2006)Free PDF Version Why Children Need Physical Education from NASPE Why Children Need Physical Education American Heart Association Position on increasing PE in the schools. American Heart Association Position on increasing PE in the schools Childhood Obesity Policy Backgrounder from the American Heart Association. Childhood Obesity Policy Backgrounder from the American Heart Association School Health Index for Physical Activity and Healthy Eating, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Adolescent and School Health. School Health IndexCenters for Disease Control and Prevention Surgeon General's Report (Latest Research On Health & Physical Activity) Surgeon General's Report The Surgeon Generals Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity Increasing Physical Activity: A Report on Recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services Increasing Physical Activity: A Report on Recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services Promoting Better Health for Young People Through Physical Activity and Sports A Report to the President From the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Secretary of Education (located on the CDC Web site) Promoting Better Health for Young People Through Physical Activity and Sports A Report to the President From the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Secretary of EducationCDC Web site Guidelines for School and Community Programs to Promote Lifelong Physical Activity Among Young People

21 Ideal Variables: # of students in school Class size # of PE class per week # of PE teachers Teaching load # of teaching stations # of periods per day Length of class Realistic Variables: Student variables Science Lab (HS) Choice of classes (HS) Teacher variables Switching locations Unnatural progression of grades Part-time teachers Lets Examine Your School and PE Program... How can we balance ideal and realistic variables so that both teachers and students will be satisfied with the schedule?

22 PeriodMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday Period 1 7:40-8:23 Period 2 8:26-9:11 Period 3 9:14-9:59 Period 4 10:02-10:47 Period 5 (lunch) 10:50-11:14 11:17-11:38 11:41-12:02 Period 6 12:05-12:48 Period 7 12:51-1:34 Period 8 1:37-2:20

23 PeriodMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday Period 1 7:40-8:23 Fr 1 Teacher A Fr 2 Teacher B Fr 3 Teacher C Fr 4 Teacher A Fr 5 Teacher B Fr 6 Teacher C Fr 1 Teacher A Fr 2 Teacher B Fr 3 Teacher C So 7 Teacher A So 8 Teacher B Planning C Fr 4 Teacher A Fr 5 Teacher B Fr 6 Teacher C Period 2 8:26-9:11 Sr 4 Teacher A Sr 5 Teacher B Planning C Planning A, B, C Sr 4 Teacher A Sr 5 Teacher B Planning C Planning A, B, C So 4 Teacher A So 5 Teacher B So 6 Teacher C Period 3 9:14-9:59 Fr 7 Teacher B Fr 8 Teacher C Planning A Fr 9 Teacher A Fr 10 Teacher C Planning B Fr 7 Teacher B Fr 8 Teacher C Planning A Sr 9 Teacher B Sr 10 Teacher C Planning A Fr 9 Teacher A Fr 10 Teacher C Planning B Period 4 10:02-10:47 Jr 1 Teacher A Jr 2 Teacher B Jr 3 Teacher C Sr 1 Teacher A Sr 2 Teacher B Sr 3 Teacher C Jr 1 Teacher A Jr 2 Teacher B Jr 3 Teacher C S0 9 Teacher A S0 10 Teacher C Planning B So 7 Teacher A So 8 Teacher B Planning C Period 5 (lunch) 10:50-11:14 11:17-11:38 11:41-12:02 Lunch for Teachers A, B, C Rotated Lunch Duty Lunch for Teachers A, B, C Rotated Lunch Duty Lunch for Teachers A, B, C Rotated Lunch Duty Lunch for Teachers A, B, C Rotated Lunch Duty Lunch for Teachers A, B, C Rotated Lunch Duty Period 6 12:05-12:48 So 4 Teacher A So 5 Teacher B So 6 Teacher C Jr 4 Teacher A Jr 5 Teacher B Jr 6 Teacher C Sr 6 Teacher A Sr 7 Teacher B Sr 8 Teacher C Jr 4 Teacher A Jr 5 Teacher B Jr 6 Teacher C Sr 6 Teacher A Sr 7 Teacher B Sr 8 Teacher C Period 7 12:51-1:34 Jr 7 Teacher C Jr 8 Teacher A Planning B Sr 9 Teacher B Sr 10 Teacher C Planning A Jr 7 Teacher C Jr 8 Teacher A Planning B Sr 9 Teacher B Sr 10 Teacher C Planning A S0 9 Teacher A S0 10 Teacher C Planning B Period 8 1:37-2:20 So 1 Teacher A So 2 Teacher B So 3 Teacher C Jr 9 Teacher A Jr 10 Teacher B Planning C So 1 Teacher A So 2 Teacher B So 3 Teacher C Jr 9 Teacher A Jr 10 Teacher B Planning C Planning A, B, C

24 PeriodMonday Period 1 7:40-8:23 Fr 1 Teacher A Fr 2 Teacher B Fr 3 Teacher C Period 2 8:26-9:11 Sr 4 Teacher A Sr 5 Teacher B Planning C Period 3 9:14-9:59 Fr 7 Teacher B Fr 8 Teacher C Planning A Period 4 10:02-10:47 Jr 1 Teacher A Jr 2 Teacher B Jr 3 Teacher C Period 5 (lunch) 10:50-11:14 11:17-11:38 11:41-12:02 Lunch for Teachers A, B, C Rotated Lunch Duty Period 6 12:05-12:48 So 4 Teacher A So 5 Teacher B So 6 Teacher C Period 7 12:51-1:34 Jr 7 Teacher C Jr 8 Teacher A Planning B Period 8 1:37-2:20 So 1 Teacher A So 2 Teacher B So 3 Teacher C

25 PeriodMonday Period 1 7:40-8:23 Freshmen Period 2 8:26-9:11 Senior Period 3 9:14-9:59 Freshmen Period 4 10:02-10:47 Junior Period 5 (lunch) 10:50-11:14 11:17-11:38 11:41-12:02 Lunch for Teachers A, B, C Rotated Lunch Duty Period 6 12:05-12:48 Sophomore Period 7 12:51-1:34 Junior Period 8 1:37-2:20 Sophomore

26 Discussed in 299 – set the stage on day 1 Rules file Discipline May be a school-wide or school PE department plan Dressing and Showering Uniform? Dress code? Same for teacher? Showering?


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