Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Getting the Biggest Bang for Your Building Bucks through Professional Construction Management Creating The Infrastructure For Tomorrow’s Education September.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Getting the Biggest Bang for Your Building Bucks through Professional Construction Management Creating The Infrastructure For Tomorrow’s Education September."— Presentation transcript:

1 Getting the Biggest Bang for Your Building Bucks through Professional Construction Management Creating The Infrastructure For Tomorrow’s Education September 20, 2014 Kissimmee FL

2 Overview What, Where & Why use Construction Management The Challenge School Building Process Standards of Practice Certified Construction Managers Benefits of a CM Proofs and Examples

3  Non-profit formed in 1982 for the Construction Management industry.  12,500+ members:  CM/PM practitioners  Corporate members  Owners: public and private  Academic and associate members  2,300+ Certified Construction Managers.  29 regional chapters and 48 student chapters at colleges and universities nationwide.

4 National experts in K-12 facility assessment, planning and program management  200 K-12 clients  60 large urban school clients  $30 billion in construction  #3 in Education (Engineering News Record) K-12, By the Numbers

5 LAUSD Bond Program History Decades of Unmet School Needs  From 1980 to 2002, Enrollment Grew by More Than 200,000 Students.  Prior to 1997, the Last Local Bond Was in A 34 Year Gap  Overcrowding Was Addressed By:  Placing Portable Classrooms At Schools –Reduced Playspace and Parking Areas, Created Line-of-Site Challenges  Instituting Multi-Track Calendars – Some Schools Had 17 Less Days Of Instruction o 227 Multi-Track Schools in ; 188 of Which Were Concept 6 Schools  Involuntarily Busing Students Across The District o 111 Schools Required Involuntary Busing in  Enrollment Increase Accelerated Deterioration of Aging School Infrastructure.

6 History of LAUSD Bond Program Funding First Phase of Program Proposition BB  $2.4 Billion Measure K  $3.35 Billion Measure R  $3.87 Billion Measure Y  $3.985 Billion Leveraged ~$12 Billion of Local Funding Targeted for Projects Executed by the Facilities Services Division into a $19.5 Billion Program

7 Delivered So Far… First Phase of Program  130 new school projects and 372 additional projects within the New School Construction Program.  Provided more than 164,000 new K-12 seats.  Approximately 23,000 Projects Completed under Repair & Modernization Program.  Eliminated Multi-Track Calendar Operations.  Eliminated Involuntary Busing.  Achieved implementation of full-day Kindergarten at 475 schools that contain a kindergarten curriculum.  Completed 181 out of 184 charter facilities projects.  Completed all 31 early education center expansion projects.

8  Despite Nearly $20 Billion of Investments, Billions of Unmet Capital Needs Remain  For the Past 17 Years…  We’ve Been Making Up for Decades of Neglect  The Emphasis of the Bond Program Has Been on New School Construction  However…  Overcrowding has Severely Increased the Wear and Tear of Buildings and Decreased Their Life Expectancy  Operational Funding for Deferred Maintenance Does Not Keep Up With Capital Need  The Vast Majority of Students Attend School in Legacy Schools There Is Still More Work To Be Done First Phase of Program

9 Initiating Next Phase of the Bond Program  $7 Billion School Construction Bond, Measure Q Approved  Due to Nationwide Economic Downturn, Until Recently District was Unable To Initiate Next Phase of Bond Program  Constrained by an Inability to Issue Bonds, District Has Focused Efforts on Assessing the Conditions of our School Facilities  Completed Capital Needs Assessment and Planning Effort  Facilities Condition Assessment in Progress  $7,852,970,000 Allocated to Support Development of New Projects Under “School Upgrade Program”

10 What is Construction Management? A professional service that applies effective management techniques to the planning, design, and construction of a project from inception to completion for the purpose of controlling time, cost and quality. Construction Management is a discipline and management system specifically created to promote the successful execution of capital projects for owners.

11 Why Use a Professional CM? Promote communication and understanding for everyone involved the project. Help bring projects in on schedule, within budget, environmentally compliant and at appropriate quality. Reconcile the scope of work to the budget. Manage overall budget and schedule conformance. Manage procurement and quality control for multiple projects. Manage M/WBE participation program. Coordinate technology program. Anticipate, avoid and resolve potential problems.

12 School Building Process Primary components of School Construction: – Determining the Need – Defining Projects – Acquiring Project Sites – CEQA/Environmental Assessment – Designing Projects – Construction & School Opening Each of the require unique expertise and must be orchestrated diligently to achieve success, and maximize the contribution of state, local and federal funds.

13 School Building Process The typical duration of a new school project ranges from four to six years

14 School Building Process

15 The Challenge  Need Expert knowledge.  Specific experience and trained professional is required.  Workload is fluctuating.  Scope of work is specific to a project or the program.  You are in the schools business, not the construction business. Whether in-house or outsourced, professional construction management can help.

16 Most Common Approach AEs hired and work begins without first developing a comprehensive plan for entire program. ? $ Brain Storming Program S i t e Scope Standards Design Standards Equity Standards Prototypes Scope to Budget Exercise

17 Opportunity Curve Time Savings Potential Start Up Preconstruction Procurement Construction Programming and Start-up Establish Baseline Scope Budgets Schedule More than Construction Getting it Right

18 Where CMs Add Value  Upfront Planning  Financial/Funding Strategies  Community Outreach  Program Controls  Design (Preconstruction)  Procurement and Delivery  Construction  Project Closeout  O&M

19 Why Use Construction Management Firms?  Expert knowledge is not present in the District.  District recruitment process is not meeting the requirements:  Process takes too long  District salary rates are not able to attract qualified candidates  Firms recruit nationwide for top candidates.  Reductions in consultant staffing do not require long, tedious, and detrimental must place process necessary for District employees.  Avoids placing the fiscal burden on the District of permanent District employees who will require funding for the length of their career.  Consultants provide corporate level support and training at no additional cost to District.  Requirement is not long term or permanent (cyclical nature of the work).  Tight budgets and funding requires innovation to maximize purchasing.  Aggressive scheduling requires faster turnaround time.  District requires assistance beyond design and construction help, e.g. standards, FFE, move management, training of maintenance staff, etc.

20 The  Managed by Construction Manager Certification Institute (CMCI), an affiliate of CMAA, the leading organization for certifying professional CM/PM.  Accredited by American National Standards Institute (ANSI) under the International Standard Organization‘s (ISO) standard.  Endorsed by the Construction Industry Institute (CII), University of Texas: “A value adding credential for those in responsible charge of major phases of capital projects.”  Currently +2,200 CCMs, with roster growing rapidly. Program

21 Certified Construction Managers  Have demonstrated mastery of the Construction Management Association’s (CMAA) Standards of Practice and the Construction Industry Institute’s (CII) Best Practices Guide.  Proven their leadership and competency through responsible-in-charge experience.  Must keep their skills and knowledge fresh through recertification.  Deliver the benefits of industry-standard services on every job.  Provides owners with an objective assurance of knowledge skill and abilities.

22  Project Management  Cost Management  Time Management  Quality Management  Contract Administration  Professional Practice  Safety & Risk Management  Also includes the Best Practices (IR166-3) Standards of Practice

23 Beyond the Standards CCMs are also tested and expected to maintain knowledge in:  Infrastructure  Sustainability  Reducing environmental impact  Optimizing economic viability  Building Information Modeling (BIM)

24  Scope-to-budget verification and why it is important?  Assisting in site selection.  Developing phasing plans for working in occupied space. 1. Upfront Planning: The Right Start for a Successful Finish Project Timeline Decision Impact Decisions Costs Decision Cost Curve The Later the Decision, the Higher the Cost! CONSTRUCTIONPLANNING DESIGN Benefits of CM, Step by Step

25 2. Financial/Funding Strategies  Budget validation – what’s missing?  Cost modeling of total project hard and soft costs.  Financial analysis/scenario development.  Assistance with State Funding Applications or Matching Grants. Benefits of CM, Step by Step

26 3. Community Outreach  Assistance in consensus building.  Manage communications plan:  Project web site  Town Hall meetings  Regular updates to principals, staff and business and community leadership  Development of local and minority businesses. Good Communication Builds Trust – Public Trust Helps Win the Next Bond Campaign Benefits of CM, Step by Step

27 4. Program Controls  Using project control systems for more than cost and document tracking.  Web-based capabilities for broad-based progress and status communications. Benefits of CM, Step by Step

28 5. Design (Preconstruction)  Design Reviews/Quality Assurance.  Constructability/ Phasing.  Design to Budget.  Stakeholder Alignment.BetterDesignDocumentsFewerConstructionIssuesLowerProjectCosts == Benefits of CM, Step by Step

29 6. Procurement and Delivery  Labor agreements and Labor relations.  Permitting and Plan check support.  Bundling and bulk purchasing.  Outreach to develop market interest. Grows Resource Base and Assures Quality Delivery of Projects Benefits of CM, Step by Step

30 7. Construction  Safety & Risk Management  Child Safety Programs  CIP  Education/Training  Pro-active Management  Alternative delivery methods for specific projects  Design/Build  At-Risk or Turnkey Delivery  Job Order Contracting (JOCs)  Pro-Active Site Management  Project “first” with respect to issue resolution  Maintain clear communications between all stakeholders  Incentive $$ based resolution programs – rewards “zero” claims Benefits of CM, Step by Step

31 8. Project Closeout  Enhancing Project Closeout  Start planning closeout strategy before design starts  Requiring a detailed schedule of closeout tasks  Breakout detailed schedule for each closeout activity  Maintain a dynamic, cost-loaded Incomplete Work List from start of construction Smooth Transition to District Maintenance Benefits of CM, Step by Step

32 9. Commissioning  Assistance with placement of staff  Providing interim staff  Training for O&M personnel  Extended OEM warranties and service agreements Benefits of CM, Step by Step

33 Testimonial Raju Kaval, CCM, DBIA Director of Program Support Services Los Angeles Unified School District “The $26 billion new school construction and modernization program of Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) is the largest school construction program in the nation’s history. Since 1997, LAUSD has been utilizing Construction Management (CM) Firms to augment District staff to support this School Construction Bond Program. The timely access to industry expertise through the CM firms has proven to be crucial and essential for the operation of this program. CM firms have been supplementing the LAUSD staff with expert CM professionals for continued success of this program. More than 100 CM Firms participate in LAUSD’s Bond Program. CM contracts have been re-procured several times over the course of the Bond Program. In the recent re-procurement of CM contracts the criteria used to evaluate the proposals included CM Firms commitment to achieve Certified Construction Manager (CCM) credentials for their employees. The RFP also required the firms to list the number of candidates with CCM credential that the firms have provided to other public agencies during the last two years. LAUSD requires a valid CCM credential for many positions filled by CM firms and also allows candidates with valid CCM credential to substitute the certification for minimum education qualification i.e. bachelor’s degree in engineering or construction management required for applying for positions filled using District employees. LAUSD strongly agrees that the value of certification shows the independent assessment of candidate’s knowledge and skills and assurance of competency and adherence to ethical standards. LAUSD believes that the construction managers with CCM credentials, protects the interests of the project and the owner.” “The $26 billion new school construction and modernization program of Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) is the largest school construction program in the nation’s history. Since 1997, LAUSD has been utilizing Construction Management (CM) Firms to augment District staff to support this School Construction Bond Program. The timely access to industry expertise through the CM firms has proven to be crucial and essential for the operation of this program. CM firms have been supplementing the LAUSD staff with expert CM professionals for continued success of this program. More than 100 CM Firms participate in LAUSD’s Bond Program. CM contracts have been re-procured several times over the course of the Bond Program. In the recent re-procurement of CM contracts the criteria used to evaluate the proposals included CM Firms commitment to achieve Certified Construction Manager (CCM) credentials for their employees. The RFP also required the firms to list the number of candidates with CCM credential that the firms have provided to other public agencies during the last two years. LAUSD requires a valid CCM credential for many positions filled by CM firms and also allows candidates with valid CCM credential to substitute the certification for minimum education qualification i.e. bachelor’s degree in engineering or construction management required for applying for positions filled using District employees. LAUSD strongly agrees that the value of certification shows the independent assessment of candidate’s knowledge and skills and assurance of competency and adherence to ethical standards. LAUSD believes that the construction managers with CCM credentials, protects the interests of the project and the owner.”

34 Example Request For Proposal

35 Example Request For Qualifications

36 Committing to the Future Having a Certified Construction Manager lead your project increases the chances for: Reduced Risk Increased Sustainability Keep on Schedule Stay on Budget Additional Resources Look for the CCM. Hire A CCM.

37 For More Information: CMAA 7926 Jones Branch Dr. Suite 800 McLean, VA Tel: Nick Soto Vice President of Certification


Download ppt "Getting the Biggest Bang for Your Building Bucks through Professional Construction Management Creating The Infrastructure For Tomorrow’s Education September."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google