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EQ: WHAT ISSUES LEAD TO THE DECISION FOR SOUTHERN STATES TO SECEDE FROM THE UNION? STANDARD SSE2a.

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Presentation on theme: "EQ: WHAT ISSUES LEAD TO THE DECISION FOR SOUTHERN STATES TO SECEDE FROM THE UNION? STANDARD SSE2a."— Presentation transcript:

1 EQ: WHAT ISSUES LEAD TO THE DECISION FOR SOUTHERN STATES TO SECEDE FROM THE UNION? STANDARD SSE2a

2 GROWING REGIONAL DIFFERENCES THE SOUTH  ECONOMY ________________ _______________  ________________ _______________  SLAVERY ________________ _______________  TARIFFS ________________ _______________  STATES RIGHTS ________________ _______________  NULLIFICATION ________________ _______________  SECESSION ________________ _______________  MISCELLANEOUS DIFFERENCES ____ _____ ____ ______ THE NORTH

3 C.12 VOCABULARY 1.abolition-the act of making slavery illegal (abolish it) Who wanted to abolish slavery? 2.abolitionist-a person opposed to slavery 3.Underground RR-a network of people and places that sheltered slaves as they escaped from the South seeking freedom in the North. Name the leader of the UR. 4.slave codes-laws that governed the ownership, treatment, and behavior of slaves. What state passed Slave Codes? Look on page 198 and list 5 Slave Codes that Georgia passed. COPY THE DEFINITIONS BELOW.

4 ……more vocabulary 5.Popular sovereignty- the idea that the government is based on the will of the people i.e. the people decide What issue was determined by popular sovereignty? 6.Tariff- a tax on imported goods (duty) Which side favored tariffs? Why? Give an example. 7.Secession- to withdraw from the USA Which side wanted to secede? 8.Territory – a frontier area that would later apply to become a state Use p.193 to name 5 territories that later became individual states. 9.States’ rights – individual states have a right to CHOOSE to not follow certain US Constitutional laws(according to the 10 th amendment) Which side was in favor of states’ rights?

5 What was the big deal anyway? In 1819 there was an equal number of slave and free states in the United States = 11 Slave states & 11 Free states The government tried to keep a balance of power in the United States Congress This became increasingly difficult as western territories applied for statehood, so several compromises were made.

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7 BALANCE OF POWER IN CONGRESS CONGRESS SOUTHERN STATES NORTHERN STATES

8 Missouri Compromise 1820 Missouri added as a SLAVE state Maine added as a FREE state No MORE slavery allowed north of latitude 36’ 30’

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10 2 COMPROMISES WHICH TRIED TO HOLD THE NATION TOGETHER THE COMPROMISE OF 1850 THE COMPROMISE OF 1850 THE MISSOURI COMPROMISE 1820 THE MISSOURI COMPROMISE 1820

11 FREE STATE SLAVE STATE NO SLAVERY WOULD BE ALLOWED NORTH OF THIS LATITUDE LINE MISSOURI COMPROMISE

12 AFTER THE MISSOURI COMPROMISE, THERE WAS A BALANCE OF 11 “SLAVE” STATES AND 11 “FREE” STATES. THE NORTH AND THE SOUTH WERE CONTENT AS LONG AS ONE SIDE DIDN’T HAVE MORE POWER(representation) THAN THE OTHER in CONGRESS. But what would happen if one side had more representation than the other?

13 Compromise of California entered as a FREE STATE AND 2. It was decided that in the future the residents of a territory applying for statehood could decide for themselves if they wanted to be a FREE STATE or a SLAVE STATE. 3. The South did NOT like this because they were afraid of losing their power in Congress SO……….

14 Compromise of 1850

15 Georgia decided to hold a meeting to discuss the Compromise of 1850

16 Georgia Platform Compromise of 1850 Georgia’s governor called for a state convention to discuss the Compromise of 1850 & SECCESSION Georgia would abide by the Compromise of 1850 AS LONG AS THE NORTH DID AS WELL!!

17 Kansas – Nebraska Act 1854 Voters of the Kansas and Nebraska territories would decide whether slavery would be permitted (Popular Sovereignty) Bleeding Kansas Supporters for and against slavery RUSHED west to settle and control the territory Violence resulted in the name “Bleeding Kansas”

18 KANSAS-NEBRASKA ACT

19 "Come on, then, gentlemen of the slave states. Since there is no escaping your challenge, we accept it in the name of freedom. We will engage in competition for the virgin soil of Kansas, and God give the victory to the side which is stronger in numbers, as it is in right." -- Senator William Seward, on the passage of the Kansas- Nebraska Act, May 1854

20 The Kansas-Nebraska act of 1854 established both of these territories, and was a political compromise for westward expansion by rail. There was only one conflict in this act- would these new areas be free or slave states? Anti-slavery forces didn't want an extension of slavery- southerners wanted it as "slave soil", which violated the Good Will Compromise of It was ruled that the people living in both areas would vote to decide whether Kansas and Nebraska would be free or slave "soil". Nebraska was already clearly anti-slavery, but people standing on both sides of this issue flocked to Kansas within days of the act's passage. Border "ruffians" from Missouri also crossed the border, and conflicts between the two sides became violent. A miniature civil war broke out between free soldiers and slave holding Missouri settlers. Fights were gruesome and there was much killing, thus giving it the name Bleeding Kansas.

21 BLEEDING KANSAS

22 BLEEDING KANSAS

23 Caption:Members of a Free-State Battery formed to fight Pro-slavery forces in Kansas during the 'Bleeding Kansas' period, They are at Topeka in Kansas. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) Caption:Members of a Free-State Battery formed to fight Pro-slavery forces in Kansas during the 'Bleeding Kansas' period, They are at Topeka in Kansas. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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25 Slavery in Georgia Since its founding in 1733, Georgia had prohibited slavery. By 1844 the slogan was…”the MORE cotton the more slaves and the more slaves the more cotton.” $ $1, $1,800 Georgians were pressured by abolitionists to out law slavery.

26 Dred Scott Supreme Court Case Dred Scott was a slave who had lived in free territory and wanted to sue in federal court for his freedom. The Supreme court denied his right to sue in federal court for his freedom b/c he was black The supreme Court ruled that Congress could not ban slavery from America’s territories.

27 2 Sides of the Slave Issue Pro-Slavery Arguments Slavery was important to the growth of cotton The South was afraid of slave revolts (Nat Turner) Northern abolitionists were angering the South by demanding the slaves be set free Anti-Slavery (abolitionists) Arguments Underground RR was set up to smuggle slaves out of the South (Harriet Tubman) Frederick Douglas was an abolitionist newspaper editor William Loyd Garrison was editor of “The Liberator” Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin exposing slave life in the South.

28 Resistance within Georgia Georgia Legislators GA legislators passed “Slave Codes” 1.Slaves could not assemble without a white person being present-why? 2.Slaves not allowed to travel without a pass-why? 3.Against the law to teach a slave to read or write-why? 4.Slaves could not work in a print shop-why? 5.Slaves were prohibited from owning a drum-why ? How Did Slaves Resist? 1.Murdered the overseer 2.Set fire to buildings 3. Committed suicide 4. Ran away – (Canada or Florida) 5. Pretended to be sick, work slowly, damage tools/property, stole

29 What’s next?


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