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United Nations Development Programme Armenia UNDP Armenia Anti-Corruption Programme June 30-July 2, AC-PAR CoP Bratislava.

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Presentation on theme: "United Nations Development Programme Armenia UNDP Armenia Anti-Corruption Programme June 30-July 2, AC-PAR CoP Bratislava."— Presentation transcript:

1 United Nations Development Programme Armenia UNDP Armenia Anti-Corruption Programme June 30-July 2, AC-PAR CoP Bratislava

2 Mandate of AC Bodies: Anti-Corruption Council Chaired by PM, high-level interagency body (executive and legislative reps) established in 2004 to coordinate activities of public agencies and develop AC policies and strategy The ACC mandate includes: Coordination and monitoring of development of AC priorities and implementation of AC policies Ensuring national and int’l cooperation Ensuring the country meets its int’l commitments Armenia

3 United Nations Development Programme Armenia Created under the ACC ToR, headed by presidential advisor Monitors implementation of AC Strategy; provides recommendations to ACC on how to improve AC mechanisms, including based on review of AC experience of other countries, int’l organizations and RA government agencies Monitors country’s compliance with int’l commitments and obligations, reports to ACC Analyzes legal drafts from corruption risks perspective Composition: 12 working groups (with representatives of NGOS) – one for each respective chapter of AC Strategy Mandate of AC Bodies: Monitoring Commission

4 United Nations Development Programme Armenia MC mandate was not clear enough for effective monitoring, especially given the decentralized management system in AC sector, where various agencies (LE, State Revenues, HRDO, Central Bank, Control Chamber, etc.) are assigned to implement AC measures in their respective sectors MC did not have its own adequate resources, both financial and staff. Accordingly, it mostly relied on professional assistance from the government administration (e.g., for legal analysis, etc.) that left room for “good-will”-based decisions and responses Procedures for formation of MC working groups were not clear-cut: as a result, some of them had been mostly dormant and/or provided little value-added to MC. Overall, under the first AC Strategy, the MC’s mandate proved to be insufficiently functional. Under the second AC Strategy ( ) its mandate is somewhat expanded to include trainings and closer monitoring of country’s commitments under GRECO and OECD. Also – and importantly – the Strategy requires establishment of a dedicated AC entity (AC Center) and secretariat. Issues

5 United Nations Development Programme Armenia Monitoring Commission could hardly be viewed as a dedicated agency with a clear-cut mandate, accordingly, capacity building in “classical” format was hardly feasible High public demand for engagement in AC initiative; lack of MC capacity to meet such a demand Other bilateral and multi-lateral organizations active in AC sector (WB, USAID, OSCE, CoE) None of these organizations, however, prioritized “demand side” and participatory processes in their AC assistance schemes and programmes Hence, UNDP focused its support in AC sector on participatory processes (e-interventions, public perception survey, media programmes, etc.) UNDP Approach: why “bottom up” participatory and policy- level VS “classical” capacity building?

6 United Nations Development Programme Armenia Anti-Corruption Monitoring Methodology: Developed jointly with MC, approved by ACC Monitoring results analyzed together with respective ministries Recommendations provided to the government and MC, most of them included in the AC strategy. UNCAC Gap Analysis: Conducted by independent experts (in close consultations with UNODC), coordinated with MC Presented to and discussed with civil society organizations, both in Yerevan and in the regions, business community, media, etc. Presented to the government, ACC and MC; majority of recommendations included into AC Strategy UNDP AC Interventions: ACPM and UNCAC Gap Analysis

7 United Nations Development Programme Armenia UNDP interventions contributed to: Enhance capacity and understanding of MC on how to engage citizens in AC initiatives (ACMP) thru participatory processes – something that is part of MC mandate Build capacity of a broader number of players in AC sector, including citizens, civil society, media, etc. (mostly thru ACPM) including development of sectoral priorities Develop a high-quality policy level recommendation in AC sector (health and education for ACPM, compliance with UNCAC for gap analysis.) Parallel to that, the new AC Strategy puts, among other, much stronger an emphasis on citizen participation in AC initiatives. Some Conclusion

8 Thank You! United Nations Development Programme Armenia


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