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Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 1 Richard Baker - 2003 Restarts This material was developed for the Entry Level of becoming a Referee,

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Presentation on theme: "Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 1 Richard Baker - 2003 Restarts This material was developed for the Entry Level of becoming a Referee,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 1 Richard Baker Restarts This material was developed for the Entry Level of becoming a Referee, in order to show the relation -- in time -- of ball out of play and the restart of play. It also provides a good refresher on Restarts, especially for new referees, by presenting the game as a time line.

2 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 2 Richard Baker A Time Line Opening Kickoff End of Half

3 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 3 Richard Baker Something Happens here that causes play to cease And be restarted sometime later

4 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 4 Richard Baker That Something Is... Ball out of play or Referee stops game

5 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 5 Richard Baker That Something Is... Ball out of play Over touch line Over goal line - by attackers - by defenders Throw-in Goal Kick Corner Kick Kick Off

6 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 6 Richard Baker That Something Is... Referee Stops Game Penal Foul Technical Foul Misconduct Something Else DFK or PK IFK Drop Ball or

7 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 7 Richard Baker While the ball is out of play... Can a goal be scored? Can a player commit a DFK (Penal) foul?

8 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 8 Richard Baker What Can Happen? Substitution Injury care Caution or Send-off Technical Foul

9 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 9 Richard Baker When is Restart Valid? Throw-in Corner Kick Free Kick Goal Kick Penalty Kick Kick off Drop Ball The Ball Enters field of play Moves Moves Forward Leaves Penalty Area Touches Ground

10 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 10 Richard Baker Extra Requirement on Free Kicks u If the free kick is taken from inside the penalty area by the team that owns that penalty area then u it is not in play until it leaves the penalty area In Play

11 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 11 Richard Baker Summary: Restarts after Fouls

12 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 12 Richard Baker Restarts - Overview When play needs to be stopped, one of the most difficult aspects for new Referees to understand, is appreciating the differences between the three restarts: Direct Free Kick (Laws 12 & 13), Indirect Free Kick (Laws 12 & 13), and the Dropped Ball (Law 8). A Direct Free Kick, an Indirect Free Kick or a Dropped Ball can only be awarded if the Referee needs to stop play whilst the ball is on the field of play.

13 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 13 Richard Baker Restarts – Overview Direct Free Kick Direct Free Kick: There are ONLY 10 Direct Free kick offences. The ball must be on the field of play, and the offence must be committed whilst play is in progress. The offence must be committed against the opposing team. A Direct Free Kick cannot be awarded for offences committed between players of the same team. Or for offences committed off the field of play. Or for offences committed by players against the Referee or team officials or spectators etc. A Direct Free Kick restart cannot be awarded for offences committed whilst the ball is OUT of play.

14 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 14 Richard Baker Restarts – Overview Indirect Free Kick Indirect Free Kick: There are hundreds of reasons to restart play with an Indirect Free Kick. Basically, if the stoppage in play is for a foul or an offence that does not merit the award of a Direct Free-Kick, then an Indirect Free Kick is the usual restart. An Indirect Free Kick restart cannot be awarded whilst the ball is OUT of play

15 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 15 Richard Baker Restarts – Overview Dropped Ball Dropped Ball: A dropped ball is used to restart play, when the Referee under the following circumstances has stopped play: due to external interference (such as a dog entering the field of play) if a serious injury is suspected after a temporary stoppage that becomes necessary while the ball is in play - for any reason not mentioned elsewhere in the Laws of the Game (such as a player losing his shorts!!) for any other reason which is not covered by Direct and Indirect Free-kicks. A dropped ball restart cannot be awarded for offences committed whilst the ball is OUT of play.

16 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 16 Richard Baker Restarts - Overview A Free Kick (Direct or Indirect) or a dropped ball restart cannot be awarded for offences committed whilst the ball is OUT of play. For example: If an offence occurs before the ball has come back into play during the taking of a goal kick or a throw–in, play is restarted with either the original goal kick or the original throw-in.

17 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 17 Richard Baker Restarts – Direct Free Kick Offences u or Penalty kick if committed against an opponent by a defender in his own penalty area. u To be taken at the place where the incident occurred unless stated otherwise. u There are only 10 Direct Free Kick Offences.

18 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 18 Richard Baker Restarts – Direct Free Kick Offences u 1. Kicks or attempts to kick an opponent; - careless, reckless or using excessive force. (Law 12) u 2. Trips or attempts to trip an opponent; careless, reckless or using excessive force. (Law 12) u 3. Jumps at an opponent; careless, reckless or using excessive force. (Law 12) u 4. Charges an opponent; careless, reckless or using excessive force. (Law 12) 5. Strikes or attempts to strike an opponent; careless, reckless or using excessive force. (Law 12)

19 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 19 Richard Baker Restarts – Direct Free Kick Offences u 6. Pushes an opponent; careless, reckless or using excessive force. (Law 12) u 7. Tackles an opponent to gain possession of the ball, making contact with the opponent before touching the ball. (Law 12) u 8. Holds an opponent. (Law 12) u 9. Spits at an opponent. (Law 12) u 10. Handles the ball deliberately * (except for the goalkeeper within his own penalty area). (Law 12)

20 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 20 Richard Baker Restarts – Direct Free Kick Offences *Handling examples follow: u A Direct Free Kick is awarded if a goalkeeper deliberately handles the ball outside of his penalty area. If after the ball is in play, a goalkeeper who is taking a throw-in, deliberately handles the ball outside of his own penalty area before it has touched another player - a Direct Free Kick is awarded. If after the ball is in play, a player taking a throw-in deliberately handles the ball before it has touched another player - a Direct Free Kick is awarded (or a penalty kick if the incident occurs inside the players own penalty area.)

21 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 21 Richard Baker Restarts – Direct Free Kick Offences u If, after the ball is in play, a player taking a goal kick deliberately handles the ball before it has touched another player - a Direct Free Kick is awarded. (Note – during the taking of a goal kick, the ball must travel wholly outside of the penalty are before it is deemed to be in play.) (Note – a penalty kick is awarded if a player (not the goalkeeper) taking a goal kick deliberately handles the ball inside his own penalty area. For this to happen, the player taking the goal kick, would have to kick the ball outside of his penalty area for it to become in play. The ball would then have to return (wind assisted) without being touched by another player, back into the penalty area before being handled by the infringing player.) u If a goalkeeper takes a corner kick, and after the ball is in play, he deliberately handles the ball outside of his own penalty area before it has touched another player - a Direct Free Kick is awarded.

22 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 22 Richard Baker Restarts – Direct Free Kick Offences u If after the ball is in play, a player taking a corner kick deliberately handles the ball before it has touched another player - a Direct Free Kick is awarded. (Note – a penalty kick is awarded if a player (not the goalkeeper) taking a corner kick deliberately handles the ball inside his own penalty area before it has been touched by another player. For this to happen, the player taking the corner kick, would have to kick the ball all the way back into his own penalty area, and deliberately handle it inside his own penalty area before it had been touched by another player. This scenario in very unlikely to ever occur!) u If a player taking a penalty kick deliberately handles the ball before it has touched another player - a Direct Free Kick is awarded to the defending team.

23 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 23 Richard Baker Restarts – Direct Free Kick Offences u And just to remind you - a direct free kick awarded to the attacking team in its opponents' goal area is a PENALTY !!

24 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 24 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Normally, to be taken at the place where the incident occurred unless stated otherwise. Following are listed the common Indirect Free Kick offences - there are many more. The easiest way to remember these, is to understand that if it is not one of the 10 Direct Free Kick offences mentioned above (or a Dropped Ball restart), the restart is an Indirect Free Kick.

25 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 25 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u If a goalkeeper, inside his own penalty area, commits any of the following four offences: u 1. Takes more than six seconds while controlling the ball with his hands before releasing it from his possession. (Law 12) u 2. Touches the ball again with his hands after it has been released from his possession and has not touched any other player. (Law 12) u 3. Touches the ball with his hands after it has been deliberately kicked to him by a team-mate. (Law 12) (Sometimes referred to as a Back-Pass but should be known as a pass to the keeper.) u 4. Touches the ball with his hands after he has received it directly from a throw-in taken by a team-mate. (Law 12)

26 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 26 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u An indirect free kick is also awarded to the opposing team if a player, in the opinion of the Referee commits the following four offences: u 5. Plays in a dangerous manner. (Law 12) u 6. Impedes the progress of an opponent. (Law 12) (Sometimes referred to as Obstruction.) u 7. Prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his hands. (Law 12) u 8. Commits any other offence, not previously mentioned in Law 12, for which play is stopped to caution or dismiss a player. (Law 12) u (For example, when the Referee stops play to administer a caution for dissent.)

27 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 27 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Law 3 – The Number of Players: u If play is stopped by the Referee to administer a caution, the match is restarted by an indirect free kick, to be taken by a player of the opposing team from the place where the ball was when play was stopped. u Examples: u 9. A bleeding player refuses to leave the field of play when asked to do so by the Referee. (Law 3) u 10. After starting the second half, the Referee notices that one team has 12 players. (Law 3) u Note: If a substitute enters the field of play without the Referees permission, if the Referee stops the game, play is restarted with a dropped ball at the place it was located when play was stopped. (Law 3).

28 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 28 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Law 4 – The Players Equipment: u If play is stopped by the Referee to administer a caution, the match is restarted by an indirect free kick, to be taken by a player of the opposing team from the place where the ball was when play was stopped. u Examples: u 11. A player refuses to tie up his bootlaces. (Law 4) u 12. A player refuses to take off a necklace or an earring. (Law 4)

29 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 29 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Law 8 – The Start and Restart of Play u If when the ball is in play, the kicker touches the ball a second time (except with his hands) before it has touched another player, an indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team, the indirect free kick to be taken from the place where the infringement occurred. u Example: u 13. A player taking a kick-off, touches the ball a second time (except with his hands) before it has been touched by another player. (Law 8) u For any other infringement of the kick-off procedure - the kick-off is retaken.

30 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 30 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Law 12 – Fouls and Misconduct (additional examples:) u 14. Circumventing the Laws to gain possession of the ball. For example, when a player flicks the ball up with his foot, and then heads it to his goalkeeper. (Law 12 International Decision 3.) u 15. A player strikes the Referee. (Law 12 Violent Conduct.) u 16. A player strikes a colleague. (Law 12 Violent Conduct.) u 17. Referee stops play to administer a caution for dissent. (Law 12 Shows Dissent.)

31 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 31 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Law 12 – Fouls and Misconduct (additional examples:) u 18. A player uses offensive, or insulting, or abusive language and/or gestures towards any player, a manger, the Referee or anyone else. (Law 12 Sending Off Offence.) u 19. Enters or re-enters the field of play without the Referee's permission. (Law 12 Cautionable Offence) (If game stopped to administer a caution, Indirect free kick to be taken by a player of the opposing team from the place where the ball was when play was stopped.) u 20. Deliberately leaves the field of play without the referee's permission. Law 12 Cautionable Offence) (The indirect free kick would have to be taken at the point on the boundary line where the player left the field of play – where the offence actually took place.) u 21. Shouting "Leave it" when trying to deceive an opponent. (Law 12 cautionable Offence Unsporting behaviour.) u 22. Using a colleague's back to gain height when heading the ball. (Law 12 Cautionable Offence Unsporting behaviour.)

32 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 32 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Law 13 – Free Kicks: u 23. A player taking a free kick, touches the ball a second time before it has been touched by another player. (Law 13) (Note: A free kick taken by the defending team within its own penalty area must travel outside of the penalty area before it is deemed, to be 'in-play'. If the ball is touched a second time before it has travelled outside of the penalty area, the free kick should be retaken. (Law 13)

33 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 33 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Law 14 – The Penalty Kick: u 24. If a team-mate of the player taking the kick enters the penalty area or moves in front of or within 9.5 m (10 yards) of the penalty mark and if the ball rebounds from the goalkeeper, the crossbar or the goal post and is touched by this encroaching player. (Law 14) u 25. If after the penalty kick has been taken, the kicker touches the ball a second time (except with his hands) before it has touched another player. (Law 14)

34 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 34 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Law 15 – The Throw-In: u Throw-in taken by other than the goalkeeper. l 26. If after the ball is in play, the thrower touches the ball a second time (except with his hands) before it has touched another player. (Law 15) u Throw-in taken by the goalkeeper. l 27. If, after the ball is in play, the goalkeeper touches the ball a second time (except with his hands) before it has touched another player. (Law 15) l 28. If, after the ball is in play, the goalkeeper deliberately handles the ball inside his own penalty area before it has touched another player. (Law 15)

35 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 35 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Law 16 – The Goal Kick: u Goal kick taken by a player other than the goalkeeper: l 29. If, after the ball is in play, the kicker touches the ball a second time (except with his hands) before it has touched another player. (Law 16) u Goal kick taken by the goalkeeper: l 30. If, after the ball is in play, the goalkeeper deliberately handles the ball inside his own penalty area before it has touched another player. (Law 16) (For this to happen, the goalkeeper would have to kick the ball outside of his penalty area for it to become in play. The ball would then have to return (wind assisted) without being touched by another player, back into the penalty area before being handled by the infringing goalkeeper.)

36 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 36 Richard Baker Restarts – Indirect Free Kick Offences u Law 17 – The Corner Kick: u 31. If after the ball is in play, a player taking a corner kick touches the ball a second time (except with his hands) before it has touched another player. (Law 17) u 32. A goalkeeper takes a corner kick, and after the ball is in play, he deliberately handles the ball inside of his own penalty area before it has touched another player. (Law 17) (Note – For this to happen, the goalkeeper taking the corner kick, would have to kick the ball all the way back into his own penalty area, and deliberately handle it inside his own penalty area before it had been touched by another player. This scenario in very unlikely to ever occur!)

37 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 37 Richard Baker Restarts – Dropped Ball u To be taken normally at the place where the ball was located when play was stopped. u Exception - A dropped ball to re-start the match after play has been stopped inside the goal area, takes place on the goal area line parallel to the goal line at the point nearest to where the ball was located when play was stopped. u Note: The examples following are annotated with the Law Number, are actual references within the Laws. And therefore, questions concerning these are more likely to be asked in a Referee exam.

38 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 38 Richard Baker Restarts – Dropped Ball u 1. If a crossbar becomes displaced or broken. (Law 1) u 2. If the ball bursts or becomes defective during the course of a match. (Law 2) u 3. If a substitute enters the field of play without the Referee being informed. (Law 3) u 4. If a serious injuries occurs. (Law 5)

39 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 39 Richard Baker Restarts – Dropped Ball u 5. If head injuries occurs. (Law 5) u 6. Outside (external) interference. Examples: Dog, crowd, or manager on the field of play. (Law 5) u 7. Improper conduct by an Assistant Referee or Club Linesman. (Law 6) u 8. After a temporary stoppage that becomes necessary while the ball is in play - for any reason not mentioned elsewhere in the Laws of the Game (such as a player losing his shorts!!) (Law 8)

40 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 40 Richard Baker Restarts – Dropped Ball u Some further dropped ball examples: u 9. Ball deflected by an overhanging tree branch. u 10. A dropped ball may sometimes be used to start a charity match where both of the teams are not really competing against each other. u 11. Dropped ball can be used instead of a kick-off in some 6-a-side competitions etc.

41 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 41 Richard Baker Restarts – Dropped Ball u 12. An offence committed by a player outside of the field of play whilst the ball was in play. u 13. A substitute sitting in the technical area throws an object at an opponent who is on the field of play. u 14. Dangerous item found on the field of play.

42 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 42 Richard Baker Restarts – Dropped Ball u Special Circumstances Law 8 u A free kick awarded to the defending team inside its own goal area can be taken from any point within the goal area. u An indirect free kick awarded to the attacking team in its opponents' goal area is taken from the goal area line parallel to the goal line at the point nearest to where the infringement occurred. (See diagram.) u A dropped ball to restart the match after play has been temporarily stopped inside the goal area, takes place on the goal area line parallel to the goal line at the point nearest to where the ball was located when play was stopped. (See diagram.)

43 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 43 Richard Baker Restarts – Dropped Ball u Special Circumstances Law 8

44 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 44 Richard Baker Restarts – After Striking, Throwing or Spitting Clarification for the Laws of the Game from FIFA 11 March 2002 The International Football Association Board (IFAB) has provided a new interpretation of where a foul has occurred when there has been no direct contact or when the contact has occurred off the field of play. Prior to now, for example, striking using a thrown object was punished where the action originated. The IFAB now instructs that all such infringements are to be punished where the contact occurs or would have occurred if the action had been successful, provided this location is on the field of play.

45 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 45 Richard Baker Restarts – After Striking, Throwing or Spitting There are few exceptions to this rule: u 1. If the striking or attempted striking was misconduct (i.e., the actual striking contact occurred off the field or was committed against someone other than an opposing player or substitute), the restart is an indirect free kick from the point of initiation. The guilty player should be sent off for violent conduct and shown the red card. u 2. If a substitute, standing outside the field of play, strikes or attempts to strike a player on the field of play, the restart is a dropped ball at the place where the ball was when the blow was struck. The substitute is sent off for violent conduct and shown the red card.

46 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 46 Richard Baker Restarts – After Striking, Throwing or Spitting u 3. If a player, taking a throw-in, throws the ball at an opponent, the referee is presented with a grey area involving sound reading of the conditions of the game. This throw could be considered to be trifling, unsporting behaviour, or violent conduct, depending on the force used. If the throw-in was correctly taken and the referee considers that a foul has been committed, the restart would be a direct free kick from the point of contact. If the throw-in was not correctly taken and the referee considers that misconduct has been committed, the restart would be a retake of the throw-in, because the game was not restarted properly.

47 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 47 Richard Baker Restarts – Signals Indirect Free KickDirect Free Kick

48 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 48 Richard Baker Restarts – Signals u The Referee should signal a direct free kick by firstly blowing his whistle to stop play, and then Pointing one upstretched arm upwards towards the direction that the direct free kick is to be taken. And the other arm pointing downwards to the place where the kick is to be taken. u It can also help if you can, to shout "Direct Keeper" towards the goalkeeper as a matter of courtesy. Players normally do not have a clue if a free kick should be Direct or Indirect, and as part of man-management, it is recommended that you tell them when you can.

49 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 49 Richard Baker Restarts – Signals Point in DirectionIndicate a Free Kick

50 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 50 Richard Baker Restarts – Signals u To indicate a free kick, the Assistant Referee will raise and wave his flag backwards and forwards, then point his flag in the direction that the free kick should be taken (as shown in the 2 images preceding). There is no need to make a big show of waving the flag for too long. If the Referee has not seen the offence, it can also sometimes help, if the Assistant Referee indicates why he signalled for a direct free kick. Discrete small signals by the Assistant Referee towards the Referee such as 'shirt pulling', 'elbowing' and 'pushing' motions will help the Referee understand the nature of the offence. This is all part of the unseen communication between the Referee and his Assistant Referees. communication

51 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 51 Richard Baker Restarts – Reminder u It is important to emphasise that the 6 Direct Free Kick offences shown below is considered by you the Referee to be careless, reckless or using excessive force. u You make this decision - so do not be influenced by anyone else. 1. kicks or attempts to kick an opponent. 2. trips or attempts to trip an opponent. 3. jumps at an opponent. 4. charges an opponent. 5. strikes or attempts to strike an opponent: 6. pushes an opponent:

52 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 52 Richard Baker Restarts – Reminder Charging is either a foul or it is not a foul.

53 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 53 Richard Baker Restarts – Test And if it is a foul what type of restart is it? And if it is a foul what type of restart is it? Is it an Indirect Free Kick, Direct Free Kick or a Dropped Ball?

54 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 54 Richard Baker Restarts – Test Answer Its a Direct Free Kick !!! Its a Direct Free Kick !!! (or Penalty if a charge on an attacker in the penalty area) (or Penalty if a charge on an attacker in the penalty area)

55 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 55 Richard Baker Restarts – Summary A Direct Free Kick (or penalty) should be awarded to opponents if a charge is deemed by the Referee to be a foul, irrespective of whether the players' are within playing distance or attempting to play the ball or not. A Penalty should be awarded if a charge is deemed to be a foul committed on an opponent by a defending player in the defending player's own penalty area. A player should be sent-off player off, if a charge is deemed to be a foul and it prevents a goal scoring opportunity. A player should be sent-off if a charge is deemed to be violent conduct or serious foul play (example - using excessive force). If a simultaneous innocuous shoulder charge is made by both players which the referee deems not to be a foul - the game continues. " Just shout '50/50' get on with it !! " Players stepping in front of an opponent = impedance (indirect free kick) and not a charging (direct free kick) offence.impedance Foul Charging also depends on the size or weight of an opponent.

56 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 56 Richard Baker Restarts – Summary A direct free kick is also awarded to the opposing team if a player commits any of the following four offences (Numbered 7 to 10): 7. tackles an opponent to gain possession of the ball, making contact with the opponent before touching the ball. 8. holds an opponent. 9. spits at an opponent. 10. handles the ball deliberately (except for the goalkeeper within his own penalty area).

57 Referee Training Course - Restarts June 17, 2003 P. 57 Richard Baker Restarts – The End GOOD LUCK FOR THE FUTURE IN OFFICIATING OUR WONDERFUL WORLD GAME.


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