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Head Of The Charles ® Regatta Umpire Training 2012 Rules Updates for 2012 Umpire Responsibilities Rules Review & Penalties Special Focus on Safety Understanding.

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Presentation on theme: "Head Of The Charles ® Regatta Umpire Training 2012 Rules Updates for 2012 Umpire Responsibilities Rules Review & Penalties Special Focus on Safety Understanding."— Presentation transcript:

1 Head Of The Charles ® Regatta Umpire Training 2012 Rules Updates for 2012 Umpire Responsibilities Rules Review & Penalties Special Focus on Safety Understanding the course Frequently Occurring Situations Written Test Debrief, Q&A and Closing

2 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training What Makes the Head Of The Charles ® Special? Its a large (9000 competitor), multi-day Regatta. For the majority of participating crews, it is the only time during the year that they race on this body of water The distinctive twists and turns of the river, its narrowness in spots and the requirement to pass through 6 multi-arch bridges, makes this a coxswains race It can be very difficult to pass or be passed without getting in another boats way. We minimize the potential of interference and collisions during passing situations by: Seeding boats (limited) Pacing events Categorizing rowers and boats I n t r o d u c t i o n

3 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Whats Different About the HOCR Rules? The local HOCR rules have been based on: The USRA Rules of Rowing Head Race Section Penalty statistics through 2011 The unique features of the Charles River, its bridges and the HOCR race course. The quality of the Umpire corps and The diverse quality of participating crews. Our goals relative to the application of the HOCR Rules: A safe and fair race Zero penalties issued in error and Unofficial (Adjusted) Results 15 minutes after the conclusion of each event. I n t r o d u c t i o n

4 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training What Rules Have Been Updated Since Last Year? In 2012, we further refined the rule Severe Collision - IS A passing crew (The Passer) has the right to pass on the side of its choice if and when a safe pass can be accomplished. The Passer must allow sufficient room for both their boat and the boat overtaken to stay safely within the race course. If a pass is attempted, the Passer shall not press the right to overtake to the point of severe collision. The actual severe collision incident can be caused by either a Passer or a Passee. During a severe collision one or more of the following may occur: (A) damage to a boat (B) personal injury (C) the boat being overtaken is forced either off the race course or into a bridge or (D) a rower is struck by the blades of another boat If a crew causes a severe collision that crew may be assessed a 60 second (IS) Severe Collision time penalty and may face further sanctions under Rule 10.1 – Disregard for Safety. Also 12.1 Responsibilities of Overtaking Boats (D) When boats come together and interlock, this does not necessarily result in a penalty situation if there were no specific violations of the racing rules (section 10) I n t r o d u c t i o n

5 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training 2012 What Race Course Changes Have Been Made? At the BU Bridge: Passing is permitted prior to the BU Bridge using extreme caution. Overtaking boats must ensure room is available to complete a safe pass and are subject to a safety penalty (Rule 10.1) in the event that the overtaken boat is forced into an abutment. The railroad trestle bridges second arch from the right (Cambridge) shore is the mandated route, the right (closest to Cambridge) arch of the railroad trestle bridge may not be used. Use of this arch will result in a 60 second penalty (Rule 6.1). 5

6 Umpire Responsibilities Key responsibilities Logistics Field of view Communication Self-Care Summary

7 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Your Key Responsibilities as an Umpire To ensure fairness and safety To determine if there are violations of the rules, and assign the appropriate penalties to those crews committing violations Stop a race, if there is immediate and present danger to life and limb and this is the only possible course of action to correct the situation- Lead Umpires only. R e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s

8 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Safety – The primary goal of all actions and decisions Officials are concerned with the safety of all competitors and volunteers/officials on the racecourse and in the training & launching areas Primary responsibility for safety rests with individual crews & athletes Umpire Responsibilities Look for crews/athletes in distress- in water and in boat Lead Umpire- Designate a member of the Umpire team at your station to use Emergency Radio to notify Emergency directly Give them detail in the following order (a) station location (Number and Name), (b) problem location (e.g. looking upstream toward Finish line from Station X, on the Boston (or Cambridge) side, approximately xxx yards from our station...) (c) boat type (single, double, quad, four, eight) (d) bow number(s) (e) condition of oarsperson(s)- (1) in water/boat, (2) face up/ down, (3) moving/still, (4) boat moving/stopped Umpires are not first responders- they manage race and traffic- let Emergency take care of oarsperson- unless absolutely necessary R e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s

9 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Fairness – The second goal of your actions and decisions The only factors determining the outcome of any race should be the skill and abilities of the athletes and crews The athletes are depending on you to observe the race, determine the cause of any incidents (interference, buoy violations, traffic pattern violations, etc.) and determine the penalty for infractions and to report them with full documentation Athletes get the benefit of the doubt Passing boats in particular get the benefit of the doubt R e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s

10 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Umpire Roles Assigns responsibilities for all umpires at station Does station team orientation Final approval of penalty recommendation Communicates with Umpire Central (may be delegated) regarding penalties or help needed (buoys, etc.) Responsible for making certain station is fully staffed May stop an event, following safety protocol. Observe incidents in their field of view and recommend assignment of penalties Fully document incidents as they occur All other duties assigned or delegated by the lead umpire : R e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s Lead Umpire (1/Station)Station Umpire Note: Umpire at the Start has a special responsibility... Calling umpire central after the last boat in an event clears the railroad bridge.

11 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Station Process Goal: To get a full view of developing situations to make best determination vs just looking for incidents as they happen. The process is to follow situations from entry into station to exit. Lead Umpire at the station assigns and manages teams (1 or 2 Umps) who view situations from start of station to end of station or the conclusion of the situation Lead Umpire scans an all station view and assigns teams to a specific situation on rotating /availability basis. Team follows the situation to completion or abandonment and writes up Incident Report form. This must happen immediately or data is lost. If situations activity demands the Lead will finish filling in the Form and the team will be reassigned to new situation Clean up at end of race interval

12 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Whats Expected of Every Umpire – Logistics Attend training and complete test Register Friday, and/or Sunday, at the required time, to get your gear Make certain you have all the gear required to do your job (regatta schedule, copy of rules, materials for recording incidents, telephone, list of important phone numbers, pens/pencils, appropriate clothing for weather conditions, megaphone (emergencies only), binoculars, etc.) Show up on time at your station- 30 minutes before race time Return your gear (to the next shift if you are on duty, Saturday at CBC and Sunday to CBC) R e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s

13 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Field of View Every umpire station has been positioned in a way to afford the best field of view for the part of the course for which that station is responsible Make certain that you have an unimpeded view of the course Your primary focus should be in the direction of oncoming racing crews, which is where situations that you will be expected to describe develop (unless explicitly instructed otherwise) Review the course map to understand your area of coverage, and the areas assigned to the umpires who are both up- and down-course of your position. Many stations have Umpire Buoys, 18 high, marking their sections of the course- see penalty form for approximate location R e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s

14 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Communication Prior to the start of your day, work out responsibilities at the umpire station with the lead umpire Keep clear written records of any incidents that need to be reported Initiate reports to Umpire Central (by phone) after each event has passed your station. (Well be waiting for you to call) Keep your telephone and radio on at all times For Emergency reporting, always use the radio (Channel 1) Be prepared to describe reported incidents when you receive a call from Umpire Central Do not engage in conversations with anyone other than your partner and Umpire Central regarding incidents during the race Only LEAD Umps should communicate with competitors (or those in the travel lane) and only when absolutely necessary for safety R e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s

15 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Self-Care Dress properly for a long time outside, with changing conditions Layers Hats! (for temperature and glare) and gloves Raingear Good shoes if you are standing (waterproof and warm) Be prepared for the conditions Sunglasses (for glare) Suntan lotion, a drink and snack Ballpoint pens (run less in rain) Warm wind proof coverings –Cold and windy R e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s

16 Rules Review and Penalties Overview Course rules regarding buoys Crossing the race course Traffic violations Interference and Passing Contact & Collisions Conduct Miscellaneous Rules and Violations Consideration of Penalties and Appeals

17 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Rules Interpretation – Impact of Updates Regarding interference penalties, the failure to yield to a passing crew [Rule 10.5 Non-Yield Interference (IN)] remains the most commonly observed offense. Crews obliged to yield should do so when the overtaking crew is within one (1) boat length, and when passed may have to miss a few strokes to stay safely out of the way, resulting in no penalty for the passing crew. The yield should be completed by the time the overtaking crew is within ½ length. Rule 10.6 Severe Collision (IS) has been tightened based on a review of history of observed penalties and appeals through Because most Umpires felt obliged to report a Severe Collision when there was any contact between boats, no matter how incidental, what is now considered Severe is more narrowly defined. Also, this year an IS penalty can be awarded to either a Passing Boat or a Passee, if warranted. If one boat intentionally steers into another causing a Severe Collision, a Safety Violation penalty can also be applied Responsibility of Overtaking Boat (Passer) was relaxed to the extent that when boats come together and interlock, it will generally not be a penalty situation and be considered no- fault R u l e s R e v i e w

18 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Course Rules – Buoys (Racing Crews) While racing, boats must stay on the course that is between the orange buoys (Boston side) and the green buoys (Cambridge side: where there are no green buoys, the Cambridge shore marks the course boundary). Oar blades may go over the buoys but the hull must stay on the course. Each buoy violated by the hull will result in a 10-second penalty, and is reported by code (BG – Green, BR – Orange, BW – White). For example, a crew whose hull crosses three orange buoys would be reported to Umpire Central as Boat X, BR 3. A boat being passed may not cut a buoy in the act of yielding without incurring a penalty. One missed buoy (10 sec penalty) has been known to prevent someone from winning. R u l e s R e v i e w

19 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Course Rules – Buoys (Travel Lane) Purpose: minimize interference from non racing lanes in tight areas- CBC turn and Weeks Bridge Single file, no power strokes, no stopping, proceeding firmly When in the travel lane (either on the way to the start, or returning to a launch site), it is the responsibility of every crew to keep clear of racing crews. Non-racing crews must keep the hulls of their boats within the white buoys (marking tight and caution areas in the travel lane). Their blades may cross the orange buoy line without penalty unless this action interferes with the passage of a racing boat. Buoy violations (hull outside the travel lane) will be penalized 10 seconds per buoy unless the violation results in interference with a racing crew (resulting in a greater penalty). Interference with a racing boat (by hull or blades) may result in an interference penalty or disqualification. R u l e s R e v i e w

20 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Crossing the Race Course When crossing the racecourse (either on the way to the start, or returning to a launch site), it is the responsibility of every crew to keep clear of racing crews. Before attempting to cross the course, a crew must: Make certain that there is a safe crossing interval between racing crews (typically between events) and, Wait for a dock official or other personnel assigned to launch sites to indicate that safe crossing is permitted Any action by a crossing crew that causes a racing crew to either slow down to avoid a collision or to alter course is considered interference. The crew so doing will receive a 60 second penalty (PC) for Poor Crossing which may be reported by starters, dock officials, marshals or umpires. Lead Umpires can intercede in crossing situations if they believe safety is at risk R u l e s R e v i e w

21 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Traffic Violations Traffic violations are considered under Rule 7.1, which states that any boat showing disregard for safety at any time during the weekend (including practice) will be given a 60 second penalty or may be disqualified. The penalty for such infractions fall under SV – Severe Disregard for Safety. Traffic patterns should be observed during practice as well as during races (Rule 7.2) Practice traffic patterns and race traffic patterns (including a map of the Charles River basin between the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge and the Starting Line) are illustrated in the 2012 Regatta Rules and Regulations. R u l e s R e v i e w

22 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Passing & Interference When Does Passing Begin and End? Beginning of the Pass (when boat ahead is required to begin their yielding movement): When passer is within 1 length of open water from stern of the crew about to be passed, and is closing the gap. Completion of the Pass: When there is open water (any length) between stern of the passing boat and the bow of the passed boat. The boat being overtaken should be prepared to miss a few strokes to allow the Passer to pass safely and without interference (Rule 12.2B Instructions to Umpires Regarding Interference: Because a passing situation between two boats can change from moment to moment, an umpire should resist the temptation to infer Non Yield interference unless they have followed the attempted passing situation over time (not just a "snapshot view") and can clearly ascertain that the boat ahead has shown no willingness to yield even when pressed and that the boat astern is blocked and clearly forced to slow. R u l e s R e v i e w

23 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Passing & Interference Interference: Violating the Right of Way of another competitor, thereby impeding their ability to row a fair and safe race. Boats racing have the Right of Way over non-racing boats The passing boat has Right of Way, as long as the pass can be executed safely The right to be on the course, and safety, have a higher precedent than the right to a particular part of the course (i.e. the Right of Way does not preclude the higher responsibility of avoiding collisions, or allowing another boat to race on the course) R u l e s R e v i e w

24 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Passing & Interference Responsibilities of the overtaking boat (Passer) In passing situations, the overtaking boat has right of way (on the side of its choice) if a safe pass can be accomplished. The Passer must allow sufficient room for both their boat and the boat overtaken to stay safely within the racecourse. If a pass is attempted, and there is not adequate room and time to perform the pass, the overtaking boat should delay the act of passing until it is safe to do so. The Passer must allow time for the overtaken boat to yield safely; however, if the passing crew moves in front of an overtaken boat, requiring the overtaken boat to miss a few strokes, no penalty is assessed. R u l e s R e v i e w

25 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Passing & Interference Severe Collision Defined If a pass is attempted, the Passer shall not press the right to overtake to the point of Severe Collision. Rule Note that the rule is entitled Severe Collision, not simply Collision. Judgment is involved in distinguishing one from the other. During a Severe Collision one or more of the following may occur: a. damage to a boat b. personal injury or c. the boat being overtaken is forced either off the racecourse or into a bridge. d. a rower is struck by the blades of another boat If a crew causes a severe collision that crew may be assessed a 60-second (IS) Severe Collision time penalty and may face further sanctions under Rule 10.1 – Disregard for Safety. R u l e s R e v i e w

26 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Interference and Passing (Continued) Responsibilities of the boat being passed In passing situations, the boat about to be passed must yield and give suitable room to the passing boat on the side chosen by the passing boat. Movement to yield must begin when the passing boat is within 1 length of open water (and closing) of the boat directly ahead. Failure of the boat ahead to yield the line selected by the passing boat is interference, resulting in a 60 second penalty (IN) for Non-Yield (per infraction witnessed by an Umpire). If a Severe Collision results from Passee action, the IS penalty may be applied. NOTE: Experience has shown that (IN) penalties are by far the most common interference violation. R u l e s R e v i e w

27 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Interference and Passing Penalties – Non Yield by Boat Being (or About to Be) Passed 1st infraction – 60 second penalty 2nd infraction – 120 second penalty 3rd infraction – Disqualification from the regatta Umpires should only assess the first infraction penalty, if warranted. Add-on penalties are calculated after all Umpire stations have reported The severity of penalties imposed for interference during passing are severe! For this reason, it is imperative that umpires see incidents as they develop, and clearly understand which boat is the passing boat, and which boat or boats are being passed. R u l e s R e v i e w

28 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Incidental Contact and Avoidance Blade-to blade contact is generally not grounds for interference. Crews experiencing blade-to-blade contact should disengage as soon as possible. When boats come together and interlock, it will generally not be a penalty situation and be considered no-fault. Slowing or disadvantageous maneuvering due to excessive caution by a competitor is their choice, but not one that results in a penalty for other crews nearby. Example: Crews have been observed to cut buoys (voluntarily leave the racecourse) to avoid any contact with a passing crew. Such buoy cuts are not excused. R u l e s R e v i e w

29 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Unsportsmanlike Conduct Boats or crew members showing a disregard for safety, during a race or practice, will be penalized 60 seconds (SV). If the incident is deemed severe or blatant by the observing official, the boat or crew member may be disqualified. Use of directed and repeated profanity may result in an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty of 60 seconds (UC). R u l e s R e v i e w

30 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Miscellaneous Rules and Violations Boats without bow number cards when crossing the Starting line will receive a 60 second penalty Boats starting out of sequence against the orders of the Starter will be disqualified. (The Starter may start boats out of order at his/her discretion) Boats must finish the race with their coxswains aboard (regardless of the crews feelings) Going through the right arch (closest to the Cambridge shore) of the Lars Andersen Bridge (by Harvards Weld Boathouse) and the BU Railroad Trestle Bridge, or going through any bridges left (closest to the Boston shore) arch, will result in a 60-second (AR) penalty in addition to any buoy violations incurred by doing so. Practicing in the racing lane between the first start and the last finish on a racing day could result in a 60 second penalty. R u l e s R e v i e w

31 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Consideration of Penalties & Appeals Accuracy When assessing a penalty, are we certain that we saw the incident from beginning to end (particularly true in passing situations)? Do we understand the specific rules that apply to the situation that we have witnessed? Can we accurately identify all crews involved? Was the victim clearly and significantly impeded (resulting in material disadvantage)? Was the incident avoidable? Bottom Line: The passing boat (Passer) should get the benefit of the doubt when considering the imposition of a penalty. Appeals Crews have the right to appeal any penalty. However the penalty must be filed by Appeals and must be made by a race participant who observed the incident. Coaches can be present and support the appeal. There is no right to file a protest, only an appeal. R u l e s R e v i e w

32 Special Focus on Safety Following the 2006 Regatta, there was a detailed review of regatta safety. A special committee has been working to improve response time for 2012 and beyond. What follows is our current protocol.

33 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training New in Safety Our overall goal – the fastest, most reliable and highest quality response to an incident! (90 seconds or less for the most critical) This requires that every umpire, dockmaster, marshal and race official on the course know and follow the HOCR On-Water Safety Infrastructure Guidelines and Emergency Protocol On the Water Safety

34 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Safety Logistics – Umpire Stations Each umpire station will be equipped with: One radio, supplied by HOCR, with ability to contact Emergency (both with repeaters for full course coverage). These radios can only be used to communicate with Emergency on Channel 1. Personal mobile phones used to contact Umpire Central (HOCR does not provide these phones) At least one megaphone and one air horn (marine style) Two wavable flags (RED to stop race; WHITE to signal all clear for resumption of racing) NOTE: These flags never appear unless the Lead Umpire authorizes their use. On the Water Safety

35 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Safety Logistics – Emergency Services Along the course we will have... Twelve fully equipped Emergency launches (with capacity to take on crew needing assistance) plus two DCR boats. Boat locations (marked SL 1 through 12) will be shown on your course map. Six E.S. locations spaced along the shore (Mag Beach/ Riverside (downstream of RBC), Weld, Reunion Village, CBC, MainTent, Finish) Each station includes: First Aiders trained at least in Standard First Aid and CPR. (Many trained to higher levels: e.g., National Ski Patrol Outdoor Emergency Care, EMT, Paramedic, Athletic Trainer, Nurse, MD); First Aid supplies, blankets, water, etc.; Ham Radio operators; and Ability to meet any swimmer pulled from the water at the nearest dock or other appropriate location for evaluation for discharge or further treatment. Although buoy tending will be done by SL launches, requests for action come through the PHONE logged at Umpire Central (not ) On the Water Safety

36 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Staffing for Safety – New Roles Critical Safety Roles Senior Lead Umpires (SLU) - located at at least three hot spots (Corner bridges: Weeks, Anderson, Eliot). Lead Umpires – Responsible for the response at their station Umpire Central Leader – Located at Umpire Central, who will monitor one of the two radios at that location and will stop any activity in which he is engaged to respond immediately to an emergency incident Emergency – Located at CBC, they will be the contact point for all emergency radio communication from Umpires (UC will only monitor) Note: Only SLUs or Umpire Central Leader will have authority to cancel a race in progress On the Water Safety

37 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training The Protocol – Part 1 All Incidents are to be reported to Emergency by HOCR Radio (Channel 1), by an Umpire station team member designated by the Lead Umpire NOTE: The Umpire must report relevant facts Give Emergency only the necessary detail- station location, problem location, boat, condition of oarsperson- in water/boat, face up/ down, moving/still, boat moving/stopped If not already on scene, Emergency (Net Central) will dispatch first responder via radio (Ham or HOCR Radio) Emergency is to be in charge of the injured person at the scene, with safety of victims their top priority. Umpires will direct traffic and manage the race On the Water Safety

38 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training The Protocol – Part 2 Lead Umpires are to react in parallel with Part 1 If a race is currently in progress, then the responsible Lead Umpire will: Provide directive steering guidance as appropriate to on- coming crews and determine independently whether the incident requires stopping the race or additional help, in accordance with applicable safety standards, then If, in the sole determination of the observing SLU or Umpire Central Leader, the race can not be safely continued due to an imminent safety threat, cancel the race. The Lead Umpire may contact the Umpires at the preceding station to advise them to start directing traffic and slowing crews to avoid the accident scene. On the Water Safety

39 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Stopping Race – Cancellation of Event If, and only if the Umpire Central Leader or a Senior Lead Umpire instructs Leads at all Stations to stop a race in progress, the following happens: Lead informs all Umpires at the station that the race is cancelled. The Lead will immediately begin to: (1) wave the Red flag signaling that the race has stopped, and (2) will use the megaphone to inform all crews approaching the station that the race has stopped and that they should cease rowing (stop - weigh nough - all crews) The Lead can delegate one or both of these tasks if necessary On the Water Safety

40 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training The Protocol – Part 2 (Continued) Once a race in progress has been cancelled (as confirmed by your Lead Umpire) Receive all clear condition from station with incident Upon verbal command by Umpires, boats are to continue upstream at half pressure to FINISH line. Boats may pull off the course to land at Magazine Beach or Cambridge-side boathouses, but would not be permitted to cross and head downstream prior to reaching the FINISH. The goal should be to get the boats off the course reasonably quickly, to enable subsequent races to commence, without traffic jams caused by boats stopped on the course waiting to cross. We dont need to have yet another emergency during clean-up from the first one. The race is cancelled and the schedule does not permit a re-row later in the day. On the Water Safety

41 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Special Safety Instructions Provided to Crews (in packets) In the event of an equipment failure (e.g., lost rudder or skeg) a crew should move to the side of the course and stop racing. In this way they avoid being a danger to themselves and to others racing. These crews should paddle when in no danger of causing collision, and follow instructions of regatta officials. If a boat capsizes or becomes water-logged, the crew should stay with the boat (as a float) until rescued. Swimming away from the boat creates several more water hazards for following crews. A single swimmer is hard to see. If a rower is ejected (e.g., by a crab) – the boat should stop as soon as safely possible, and remain with the ejected rower until they are rescued and safe. On the Water Safety

42 Understanding the Course

43 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training The Course: Three Miles of Bridges and Curves T h e C o u r s e

44 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Umpire Stations There are 16 umpire stations along the race course, from Start to Finish. Each station is staffed by a crew of at least two umpires (Note: If during the course of a race an umpire must leave the station, provide Umpire Central with advance notice, if possible. Please do not leave the station until a replacement arrives). It is important that each umpire station have an unimpeded view of the race course Each station has a unique set of challenges T h e C o u r s e

45 Frequently Occurring Situations Situations drawn from past Head Of The Charles Regattas. Situations using boat and course replicas Incident report form completion

46 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #1 x x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish A B C Which boat gets the penalty?

47 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #1 (Continued) x x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish A B C Unless you know which is passing, you do not know who is penalized!

48 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #1 (Continued) x x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish A B C A B C What do you think now? Before After

49 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #1 (Continued) x x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish A B C A B C Boat C or B gets the penalty? Before After

50 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Based on what weve just seen, you can understand why this sketch is an inadequate explanation. The events leading up to the incident, and the role of each crew involved must be captured on the incident report (shown later). Reporting Interference – Make a Sketch of the ENTIRE Incident

51 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #2 x x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish A B C A B C Same situation at the bridge as in #1. But what do you think now? Before After

52 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #2 (Continued) x x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish A B C A B C B has initiated a squeeze play and gets the penalty if either A or C is forced off the race course. (Note that both A and C have yielded) Before After

53 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #3 x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish Before After A B A B B is slowing down. Is this interference? 1 Boat Length

54 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #3 (Continued) x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish Before After A B A B Yes, A has failed to yield the shorter line chosen by B. 1 Boat Length

55 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #3 (Revisited) x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish A B Before After A B In allowing B to pass, the properly yielding boat A had to miss a few strokes. Has B interfered with A? 1 Boat Length A slows after missing two strokes

56 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #3 (Revisited) x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish A B Before After A B No. If A has to miss a few strokes to let B complete a safe pass, this is not interference. 1 Boat Length A slows after missing two strokes

57 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #4 x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish Penalties? To Whom?

58 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Classic Interference Incident #5 x Out of Bounds Travel Lane Buoy Racing Lane BuoyReturn Arch To the Finish If youd only seen Stage 3, who would you have penalized? Note new application of IS rule.

59 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training A B B A To the Finish B chose the starboard side and was given right of way, but now must leave room for A to row until pass is complete (although A now has shortest line) A yields the shortest line (inside of turn) to B Sometimes, the Shortest Line is Obvious, But This Can Change Over the Course

60 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Buoy Cut Incidents Which Occur in Light Traffic Are Easy to Capture and Report In these incidents, there appears to be no interference; therefore, these boats are assessed penalties of their own creation.

61 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Buoy Cut Incidents Involving Interaction with Other Boats Require More Explanation This incident is more complex. 34 appears to have veered off course when 33 did not yield. The umpire on the BU Bridge has clearly indicated that 34 is the passing boat. What penalty or penalties should be assessed?

62 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training An Understanding of the Whole Incident is Necessary to Ensure a Proper Ruling 33 appears to be guilty of interference. However, if 34 chose to row outside the race course to pass 33, 34 might be assessed penalties for buoys missed. If 33 forced 34 off the course in the midst of a safe pass, then no penalty for 34.

63 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training How to Use the Umpire Incident Report Form Complete one form for each incident – all sections must be completed (noting Event, Boat Numbers/Crews, Facts, Illustration with annotations, Penalty recommendation(s)) Draw a picture of the incident, illustrating the flow (stages) of the event, accurately positioning and labeling each boat Write clearly and concisely Make certain that there is no ambiguity about whether a penalty or no penalty is recommended I n c i d e n t R e p o r t

64 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Completion of the Top Section of the Incident Report Form Some parts may be completed in advance. Checking off the incident type provides clarity when one looks at the drawing and narrative. And when reporting use the 2 letter codes! Make certain that you let Umpire Central know in which event the incident occurred.

65 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Completion of the Bottom Section of the Incident Report Form The blank form (provided for your illustration of incident) allows you to accurately position the incident on the race course. What you see on the form is your Field of View. This is where the Umpire is positioned This is the route of travel for racing crews

66 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Good Illustration... But Would Be Better With Lines Showing Path of Crews Incident stages are clear Detailed Explanation and Comments

67 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Completion and Submission of the Incident Report Form All completed forms are passed to the Lead Umpire Resolution of differing points of view by umpires at a station If differing points of view on incident and/or penalty, decision of Lead Umpire is transmitted over phone to umpire central. In the absence of consensus, Incident Reports should document BOTH points of view, and should be submitted to umpire central by cyclist Lead Umpire prepares packet of completed forms for each event (with pictures if appropriate) for cyclist pickup. I n c i d e n t R e p o r t

68 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Determination of Unofficial and Official Results Based on phone-in incident reporting, Unofficial Adjusted Results are prepared and released by umpire central 15 minutes after end of the event. Jury reviews all penalties referencing hardcopy forms and validates Umpire decisions. Competitors, on reviewing results, have the right of appeal. Jury will process all appeals, make a determination, update Unofficial Results and provide Official Results. I n c i d e n t R e p o r t

69 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training In the Heat of Action Events Things Happen Quickly! What Can You Do? Clarify roles at the umpire station When multiple situations are occurring, clearly understand who is responsible for watching each Anticipate Identify developing situations Make scratch notes early Pictures are simple, fast and convey lots of information – Make a scratch sketch immediately following the incident, indicating: Location Orientation Effect I n c i d e n t R e p o r t

70 Umpire 2007 Umpire Training Exam and Follow Up – A Learning Experience Operational Details Distributed at beginning of training 30-Minutes to Complete Multiple Choice and Fill-in-the-Blanks Open Book/Individual Effort Questions are welcomed After the Exam Notification a few days after test (Answer Key Immediately Available) Evaluation of Training (Continuous Improvement) W r i t t e n Exam

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