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Using NAEP Assessment Items Instructionally: Teaching Students to Be Strategic Jeanne Foy, NAEP State Coordinator.

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Presentation on theme: "Using NAEP Assessment Items Instructionally: Teaching Students to Be Strategic Jeanne Foy, NAEP State Coordinator."— Presentation transcript:

1 Using NAEP Assessment Items Instructionally: Teaching Students to Be Strategic Jeanne Foy, NAEP State Coordinator

2 2 Organization Part I: Introduction to Using Assessment Items Part II: Why Use Assessment Items for Instruction? Part III: Web Resources NAEP Released Items NAEP Assessment Toolbox Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies Reading Math Part V: Alaska Standards Based Assessment Resources

3 Part I: Introduction to Using Assessment Items3 Part I Introduction to Using Assessment Items

4 Part I: Introduction to Using Assessment Items4 Using Assessment Items Wealth of resources available through released National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) questions Released items can be used instructionally Teach to the standard Teach students strategic reasoning skills

5 Part I: Introduction to Using Assessment Items5 What Is the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)? The nations only nationally representative, continuous assessment of what the nation s students know and can do in school Administered in Alaska as part of NCLB every other year since 2003 for Grade 4 mathematics and reading Grade 8 mathematics and reading

6 Part I: Introduction to Using Assessment Items6 Benefits of Using These Resources Alignment with state standards/GLEs Opportunity for students to learn state standards/GLEs Excellent examples of assessment items Activities that can be used to augment or supplement what teachers are already doing Easy activities to drop in along with other classroom activities (graded assignments, performance-based projects, etc.)

7 Part I: Introduction to Using Assessment Items7 Formative Assessments Used to gain immediate information on how students are learning and information is used to adapt instruction; students are also aware of their learning process All activities using NAEP items are intended for formative assessments

8 Part II: Why Use Assessment Items for Instruction?8 Part II Why Use Assessment Items?

9 Part II: Why Use Assessment Items for Instruction?9 By focusing on important standards and using tools such as sample tests, teachers can help their students understand what they need to learnand what they will be tested on. Results Now: How We Can Achieve Unprecedented Improvements in Teaching and Learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Schmoker, Mike (2006). Teach Essential Skills

10 Part II: Why Use Assessment Items for Instruction?10 Teach to the Standard The prevalence of higher-order standards surprises many educators but is borne out by a recent review of state assessments that found that almost all of the items on these testsan encouraging trendare higher-order and inferential in nature (Liben & Liben, 2005).... Results Now: How We Can Achieve Unprecedented Improvements in Teaching and Learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Schmoker, Mike (2006).

11 Part II: Why Use Assessment Items for Instruction?11 Model Strategic Thinking... studies suggest that many students of diverse backgrounds are not receiving the kind of comprehension instruction that would prepare them well on assessments that are increasingly oriented toward higher level thinking with text. It is clear from research that all students need instruction in reading instruction, especially the kind that focuses on the strategies required to answer and generate challenging questions. Raphael, T. E., & Au, K. H. (2005). QAR: Enhancing comprehension and test taking across grades and content areas. The Reading Teacher, 59 (3),

12 Part II: Why Use Assessment Items for Instruction?12... to many educators and policymakers, NAEP represents the gold standard in testing for its ability to assess both content and critical thinking. Patte Barth, Director of the Center for Public Education Value of NAEP

13 Part II: Why Use Assessment Items for Instruction?13 Items Are Meant for Learning Activities Ethical test preparation practices do not include providing students with extended practice on old or parallel forms of the test without guided practice on how to improve Classroom Assessment for Student Learning: Doing It RightUsing It Well. Portland, OR: Educational Testing Service. Stiggins, R. J., Arter, J. A., Chappius, J., & Chappius, S. (2006)

14 Part III: Web Resources14 Part III Web Resources NAEP Released Items Aligned to State Standards NAEP Assessment Toolbox for Teachers

15 Part III: Web Resources15 For NAEP teacher resources, go to state assessment web page:

16 Part III: Web Resources16 Teacher NAEP resources on Alaska NAEP web page:

17 Part I: Introduction to Using Assessment Items17 Bank of NAEP Items Linked to Alaska GLEs

18 Part III: Web Resources18 Table of Contents for Each Math and Reading Strand Table shows type of question Performance data for Alaska students Quick description of question

19 Part III: Web Resources19 NAEP Questions Linked to Alaska GLEs Posted in Word

20 Part III: Web Resources20 What Accompanies NAEP Assessment Items? Multiple-choice and constructed-response questions that have been field tested Score guides for constructed-response questions Tables identifying GLEs assessed by each item Student exemplars for every score level for constructed-response questions Student performance data

21 Part III: Web Resources21 A note on multiple-choice questions A common misunderstanding is that multiple- choice questions cannot assess reasoning proficiency. Patterns of reasoning such as comparative reasoning and various types of inference (generalizing, authors purpose, main idea) can be assessed in selected response format Classroom Assessment for Student Learning: Doing It RightUsing It Well. Portland, OR: Educational Testing Service. Stiggins, R. J., Arter, J. A., Chappius, J., & Chappius, S. (2006)

22 Part III: Web Resources22 NAEP Assessment Toolbox for Teachers Illustrates how items can be used instructionally Worksheet format Models state standards Overall objective: short, guided practice in strategic thinking

23 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies23 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies

24 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies24 NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies Readingfocus on reasoning strategies and ability to evaluate/self-assess Mathematicsstudents pattern of reasoning and errors, communication of mathematics vocabulary and concepts

25 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies25 NAEP Data Explanation (p. 3*) *Page numbers in headings refer to Assessment Toolbox pages

26 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading26 Improve Students Ability to Evaluate Quality of Work Teaching students to be able to assess the quality of work is key for students to learn how to revise their own work. Using NAEP Constructed-Response Questions and Scoring Guides To Identify Acceptable and Unacceptable Responses to Questions on a Reading Passage The following worksheets on Watch Out for Wombats, from a grade 4 NAEP reading assessment show how NAEP student samples of work and NAEP scoring guides can be used to help students identify acceptable and unacceptable answers to reading questions.

27 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading27 Overview of Questions (p. 9)

28 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading28 Reading Passage (p. 11)

29 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading29 Student Self-Assessment Worksheet (p. 13)

30 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading30 Answer Key (p. 15)

31 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading31 Variations (covered in introduction to section on pages 7 & 8) Discuss only one or two questions at a time or whatever seems appropriate Give students only unacceptable responses to revise to make them acceptable Classroom discussion and scoring of responses

32 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading32 Guided Practice/Reasoning Strategies Introduction (p. 59) Released NAEP questions offer teachers many opportunities to use guided practice with students to show how to use reasoning strategies to answer questions over a reading passage.

33 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading33 Reasoning Strategies National Reading Panel findings on Teacher Preparation and Comprehension Strategies Instruction conclude that reading comprehension can be improved by teaching students to use specific cognitive strategies or to reason strategically when they encounter barriers to comprehension when reading.

34 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading34 Reading Panel Findings Comprehension strategies include a teacher guiding the reader or modeling for the reader the actions that the reader can take to enhance the comprehension processes used during reading and the reader practicing those strategies with the teacher assisting until the reader achieves a gradual internalization and independent mastery of those processes.

35 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading35 Procedures for Modeling Reasoning Strategies (p. 59) Print the reading passage and questions. Ask students to complete these on their own. After students answer the questions on their own, share the item map and reasoning strategies worksheets with students. Use the reasoning strategies worksheets to model how to interpret and answer each question on the item map correctly with the entire class. These worksheets address the following questions: What does the item map show about this item? How do you know your answer is correct? Why are the other responses wrong or incomplete?

36 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading36 Reading Passage (p. 63)

37 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading37 Questions on Passage (p )

38 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading38 NAEP Item Map (p. 67)

39 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading39 Student Worksheet (p. 73) Students asked to rephrase GLE National data and Alaska data Percentage of students who chose each possible answer

40 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading40 Questions for Class Discussion (p. 74)

41 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading41 Constructed-Response Question Discussion (p. 69 & 70)

42 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading42 Scorers commentary for NAEP questions reinforce that students must support their opinion with evidence from the text.

43 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading43 NAEP Grade Levels NAEP assessments given at three grade levels: 4, 8, and 12 Assessment Toolbox has grade 4 and grade 8 assessment activities For use in other grades, teachers can gauge difficulty of questions by performance data

44 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading44 Available NAEP Reading Questions NAEP has many constructed-response questions NAEP uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction NAEP performance data can serve as benchmark for comparison on how students are doing, both to other students in Alaska and nationally

45 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Reading45 Discussion Questions How can assessment items be used for cooperative learning? How can assessment items be used to involve students in their own learning?

46 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math46 Examining Math Understanding (p.116) Examples of how to use NAEP multiple- choice questions for one math strand each at grade 4 and grade 8 Multiple-choice distractors carefully designed; must be plausible indicators of student thinking Peformance data shows how common mathematical misconceptions are

47 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math47 Grade 8 F&R Question (p. 131) GLE: F&R-5 translating a written phrase to an algebraic expression 8. If n represents an even number greater than 2, what is the next larger even number? A) n + 1 B) 2n + 1 C) 2n D) n + 2 E) n2

48 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math48 Mathematical Error Revealed by Each Wrong Response (p. 132) A: This expression would create an odd number. B: This expression would create an odd number; also, 2n would not create the next larger even number. C: This would create an even number, but not the next larger even number. D: Correct answer E: This would create an even number, but not the next larger even number.

49 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math49 Checking for Understanding by Using Response Cards Low-cost, available materials Technique that can be used for any content, for open-ended questions or multiple-choice questions Model strategies to address performance gap for nonroutine problems

50 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math50 Moment of Contingency To gauge the understanding of the whole class, the teacher needs to get responses from all the students in real time. One way to do this is to have all students write their answers on individual dry-erase boards, which they hold up at the teacher's request. The teacher can then scan responses for novel solutions as well as misconceptions. Leahy, S., Lyon, C., Thompson, M., & Wiliam, D. (2005). Classroom Assessment: Minute by Minute, Day by Day [Electronic version]. Educational Leadership: Assessment to Promote Learning 63 (30, 19-24)

51 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math51 Responding to Student Understanding Another approach is to give each student a set of four cards labeled A, B, C, and D, and ask the question in multiple-choice format. If the question is well designed, the teacher can quickly judge the different levels of understanding in the class. If all students answer correctly, the teacher can move on. If no one answers correctly, the teacher might choose to reteach the concept. If some students answer correctly and some answer incorrectly, the teacher can use that knowledge to engineer a whole-class discussion on the concept or match up the students for peer teaching.

52 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math52 Math Achievement Gap Another pattern evident in NAEP data is that low- SES and minority students tend to perform worse on nonroutine problems. For example, the vast majority of 4th grade and 8th grade students from all race and class groups correctly answered basic computation problems, such as = __. In contrast, there were large disparities on computation problems with extraneous information or multiple steps, such as this one: Carl has 3 empty egg cartons and 34 eggs. If each carton holds 12 eggs, how many more eggs are needed to fill all 3 cartons?

53 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math53 Math Performance Gaps Carl has 3 empty egg cartons and 34 eggs. If each carton holds 12 eggs, how many more eggs are needed to fill all 3 cartons? More than 53 percent of white, Asian, and nonpoor 4th graders answered this problem correctly, compared with only about one-third of black, Latino, and poor 4th graders. Lubienski, S. (2007). What We Can Do About Achievement Disparities [Electronic version]. Educational Leadership: Making Math Count 65 (3, 54-59).

54 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math54 Use Assessment Items to Build Math Vocabulary The meanings of words in mathfor example, even, odd, product, and factoroften differ from their use in common language. Many students needing math intervention have weak mathematical vocabularies. It's key that students develop a firm understanding of mathematical concepts before learning new vocabulary, so that they can anchor terminology in their understanding. We should explicitly teach vocabulary in the context of a learning activity and then use it consistently. A math vocabulary chart can help keep both teacher and students focused on the importance of accurately using math terms. Burns, M. (2007). Nine Ways to Catch Kids Up [Electronic version]. Educational Leadership: Making Math Count 65 (3, 16-21).

55 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math55 Math GLEs Can Serve as Vocabulary Chart

56 Part IV: NAEP Assessment Toolbox Strategies/Math56 Conclusion NAEP Assessment Items Illustrate the GLEs for Students Turn abstract idea into learning activity Clarify expectations One way of students taking responsibility for own learning

57 57 NAEP Questions Available in Many Content Areas at

58 Part V: Alaska SBA Resources58 Part V Alaska Standards Based Assessment Resources

59 Part I: Introduction to Using Assessment Items59 SBA Practice Tests Assessment Items

60 Part I: Introduction to Using Assessment Items60 Scoring Guide is key. For example, look at Grade 6 Reading.

61 Part V: Alaska SBA Resources61 Last page of the Scoring Guide has test map showing the GLE assessed by each reading question.

62 Part I: Introduction to Using Assessment Items62 Send questions or comments to Jeanne Foy, Alaska NAEP Coordinator


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