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Rubelyn Mays, M.S., R.D., LDN Revised 01-25-07. Overview Problems Associated with excessive weight Trends and Incidence of overweight in children and.

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Presentation on theme: "Rubelyn Mays, M.S., R.D., LDN Revised 01-25-07. Overview Problems Associated with excessive weight Trends and Incidence of overweight in children and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Rubelyn Mays, M.S., R.D., LDN Revised

2 Overview Problems Associated with excessive weight Trends and Incidence of overweight in children and youth Overweight Prevention Initiatives in Tennessee and Results of voluntarily BMI Screening in Public Schools in Tennessee

3 Societal Problems with Obesity Airlines charge double Ambulances capable of loading 1,600 pounds Hospitals replacing everything with bigger models Goliath Casket Company produces extra large caskets Higher Healthcare Costs Sport facilities have wider turnstiles and seats Absence from school/work Lost Productivity

4 Health Problems with Obesity Type 2 Diabetes Hypertension Cardiovascular Disease Dyslipidemia Coronary Heart Disease Psychological problems Cancers (endometrial, breast, colon) Orthopedic problems Stroke Gallbladder Disease

5 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

6 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

7 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

8 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

9 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

10 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 No Data <10% 10%–14% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

11 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

12 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

13 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

14 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

15 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

16 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

17 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

18 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

19 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

21 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

22 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002

23 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%

24 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25% (*BMI 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 person)

25 Obesity (Overweight for Children and Youth) A Public Health Problem of Epidemic proportion among the Nations and Tennessees Children and Youth

26 Childhood Overweight: Defining the Problem Obese Term should not be used for children, only for research purposes Overweight Preferred term for children at or above the 95th percentile of the BMI-for-age At Risk for Overweight Between 85th-95th percentile of the BMI-for-age

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28 An Epidemic of Overweight Children * Since the 1970s, obesity (or overweight prevalence has Doubled for preschool children aged 2-5 years Doubled for adolescents aged years Tripled for children aged 6-11 years * More than 9 million children and youth over 6 years are obese * Similar trends in U.S. adults and adults internationally

29 Percent Percent Males Females Trends in Child and Adolescent Overweight Females 6-11 Males 6-11

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31 Leading Causes of Overweight in Children: Inappropriate Eating Habits * Skipping breakfast and overeating later * High fat, sugar, sodium snacks and meals * Eating out and meals on the go * Decrease in family meal time * Lack of consistent meal times * Inappropriate serving sizes (super sizing) Department of Health – Nutrition Services

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33 * 75% of waking hours spent inactive * 5 1/2 hours or more each day with electronic media * Prohibitive costs, transportation difficulties and time constraints are leading reasons why parents say their children are less involved in organized activities * Inadequate physical activity at schools Leading Causes of Overweight in Youth: Inactivity

34 * One in five schools offers fast foods like McDonalds * More schools have pouring rights contracts to sell soft drinks in vending machines and at school events * Americans eat out 1/3 of meals * Increases in super sized portion * An extra 200 calories per day from sugary drinks results in a 2 pound weight gain per month Combine Inactivity with Poor Eating Habits…

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36 Some Overweight Preventive Initiatives in Tennessee

37 Vending Machines in Tennessee Schools * Elementary Schools: 75% * Middle Schools: 78% * High Schools: 85% Source: CDC, School Health Policies and Programs Study 2000

38 School Vending Law Schools must improve the nutritional quality of all foods sold in K- 8 th grade schools Provide high- quality foods School-based nutrition services

39 Tennessee Healthy Weight Network (THWN) Message: Eat Smart.....Move More…..Tune In

40 Action For Healthy Kids (AFHK) * Part of the National AFHK * Very active School Committee of the THWN * Sponsor and Planning this meeting * Received grant to provide technical assistance to schools developing wellness policies * Distributed Action Plan for Tennessee AFHK

41 Wellness Policy Mandate Tennessee public schools, by national mandate, formed wellness committees that established wellness policies to address student wellness and the growing problem of childhood obesity. Wellness policies were established by the beginning of the school year 2006.

42 Blue Cross/Blue Shield Walking Works for Schools * Voluntary in-school walking program for students, teachers, staff and administrators in Tennessee * Teaches children grades k-4, benefits of proper exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle * Participants walk at least 5 minutes each school day for 12 weeks

43 Body Mass Index (BMI) Law * Signed into law by Governor Phil Bredesen in May, 2005 * Authorizes Local Education Agencies (LEA) on a voluntary basis to identify public school children who are at risk for obesity by measuring BMI * Intervene with Healthy Lifestyle Education to those at risk

44 BMI Screening Results School Year (SY)

45 About the Sample *The sample was convenience comprised of those units voluntarily providing data *None of the Metro Regions were represented nor was the Southwest Region

46 Total Students *16,513 students (104 units - 22 counties) *Ranged in age from 7 to 16 years *Represents 7 0f 14 Health Department Regions -2 Northeast-7 East -3 Southeast-3 South Central -4 Upper Cumberland-2 Mid Cumberland -1 Northwest

47 More About the Students * More boys (26%) were overweight than girls (22%) * A greater proportion of black students (29%) were overweight than white (24%) * Black girls had the highest proportion of overweight or at risk for overweight (50%) * White girls had the lowest proportion of overweight or at risk for overweight (40%) * Only age group with combined proportion of overweight and at risk for overweight less than 40%: Students under age 7

48 Limitations * Not representative of the entire state school-age population * Only 5% of the sample was black or African American (current population estimate 21%) * Under-represents states urban and black population

49 Results *Despite limitations, the 16,513 students are a sizable sample that likely represents the population from which they came *Results provides insight into the BMI status of school children in the Tennessee as a whole

50 Results (continued) *24% overweight (above 95 th percentile) *18% at risk for overweight (85 th – 95 th percentile) *42% total overweight and at risk *56% normal weight (above the 5 th and below the 85 th percentile) *2% underweight (below the 5 th percentile)

51 Observation *The proportions of overweight and at risk for overweight are considerably higher than those reported for Tennessee high school students in the 2005 Youth risk Behavior surveillance System (YRBSS) * 32.1% YRBSS verses 42% BMI Project

52 Recommendations *Overall summary should be widely distributed since the 16,513 student base likely represents the population from which they came * BMI project provides insight into the BMI status of school children in Tennessee * School and class BMI reports should only be distributed to individuals with approved access to confidential information due limited small samples within the data set * Continue BMI measurement based on population-based sampling of Tennessees school-age children

53 Coordinated School Health (CSH) Statewide Funding by SY 2007 * The l04th General Assembly passed and appropriated statewide expansion of the CSH program * CSH in Tennessee was funded at 15 million dollars recurring annually * The original 10 pilot sites will continue to be funded * Beginning SY all public schools in Tennessee will have CSH

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55 Professional Efforts to Conquer Obesity * Starts with the willingness of those who are overweight to get moving * Teach young children the importance of health * Offer healthy choices for meals at home and at schools * Special facilities for people who need to Get Moving!

56 Follow This The End


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