Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Childhood Obesity Landscape. Objectives for This Session  Define childhood obesity (CHO) and understand its scope and effects  Share who some of the.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Childhood Obesity Landscape. Objectives for This Session  Define childhood obesity (CHO) and understand its scope and effects  Share who some of the."— Presentation transcript:

1 Childhood Obesity Landscape

2 Objectives for This Session  Define childhood obesity (CHO) and understand its scope and effects  Share who some of the key players are preventing CHO and what they do  Create connections with each other for sharing knowledge and support

3 Definitions How is childhood overweight and obesity measured (ages 2-19)? Body mass index (BMI) is a measure used to determine childhood overweight and obesity. It is calculated using a child's weight and height. A child's weight status is determined using an age- and sex-specific percentile for BMI (body mass index) rather than the BMI categories used for adults because children's body composition varies as they age and varies between boys and girls. Obesity = BMI at or above the 95th percentile for children of the same age and sex Overweight = BMI at or above the 85th percentile and lower than the 95th percentile for children of the same age and sex Source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

4 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults, BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

5 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

6 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

7 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

8 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

9 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

10 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

11 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

12 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

13 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

14 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

15 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

16 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

17 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

18 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

19 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

20 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

21 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

22 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

23 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

24 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

25 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2006 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

26 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2007 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

27 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2008 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

28 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2009 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

29 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2010 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

30 Effects of Childhood Obesity  Diabetes on the Rise: The rise in childhood obesity is linked to a dramatic rise in the number of children suffering from type 2 diabetes. Experts project that one in three children born in 2000 will develop type 2 diabetes.  Increased Risk of Heart Failure: Being overweight or out of shape makes the heart work harder. Overweight children are more likely to grow up to be overweight adults and more likely to develop heart problems later in life.  Economic Impact: According to figures compiled by the CDC in a 2009 study, obesity costs the US as much as $147 billion per year in direct costs and lost productivity.  Weakened Defense: Department of Defense data shows 27 percent of all young Americans 17 to 24 years of age are unable to join the military because they are too overweight to pass the physical requirements.

31 Preventing Childhood Obesity Nashville Takes Action: A City Battles Obesity The Weight of the Nation: Confronting America’s Obesity Epidemic

32 Childhood Obesity Landscape In what ways have you seen the effects of childhood obesity? Who in your schools/ communities are working to prevent childhood obesity? And how are they working on this issue?

33 Childhood Obesity Landscape Some leading, national childhood obesity prevention efforts…  The White House, First Lady’s Office o Let’s Move & the Partnership for a Healthier America  Child Obesity 180  NFL Play 60  Fuel Up to Play  Action for Healthy Kids  Y of the USA  Boys & Girls Clubs of America  National Afterschool Association, National Institute on Out-of-School Time, Afterschool Alliance  Youth Service America

34 Childhood Obesity Landscape Remaining questions?


Download ppt "Childhood Obesity Landscape. Objectives for This Session  Define childhood obesity (CHO) and understand its scope and effects  Share who some of the."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google