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Children’s Health A Call to Action Your Name Your MAFHK Region Insert Date.

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Presentation on theme: "Children’s Health A Call to Action Your Name Your MAFHK Region Insert Date."— Presentation transcript:

1 Children’s Health A Call to Action Your Name Your MAFHK Region Insert Date

2 What will you learn today? Health Trends The Challenge Action Needed

3 Healthy Students Better Learners!

4 The challenge before us…..

5 US Obesity Maps of Adults 1985 to 2003 Definitions: Obesity: –having a very high amount of body fat in relation to lean body mass, or Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher. For a 5’ 4” woman this means 30 lbs overweight. Body Mass Index (BMI): –a measure of an adult’s weight in relation to his or her height, specifically the adult’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of his or her height in meters. Source: Centers for Disease Control Definitions: Obesity: –having a very high amount of body fat in relation to lean body mass, or Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher. For a 5’ 4” woman this means 30 lbs overweight. Body Mass Index (BMI): –a measure of an adult’s weight in relation to his or her height, specifically the adult’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of his or her height in meters. Source: Centers for Disease Control

6 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%

7 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%

8 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%

9 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%

10 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%

11 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14%

12 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

13 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

14 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

15 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

16 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

17 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

18 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%-24%

19 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%-24%

20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%-24%

21 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%-24%

22 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

23 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC (*BMI  30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person) (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%-24%  25%

24 Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC Obesity* Trends Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” person)

25 “Children are mirrors reflecting how we [adults] live.” Nicholas B. Drzal, MPH, RD Nutrition Education Consultant Michigan Department of Education

26 Health Effects of Overweight and Obesity Heart Disease Stroke Diabetes Cancer High Blood Pressure Osteoporosis Gallbladder disease Sleep Apnea Source: Centers for Disease Control The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

27 Obesity… Is the second leading cause of preventable deaths in the U.S. (Tobacco related deaths rank #1) Source: Leads to13 times more deaths than guns Source: Causes 20 times more deaths than drug use Source:

28 The Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Michigan Over 4 million Michigan adults are physically inactive. Physical inactivity in Michigan adults cost almost $8.9 billion in 2002 or $1,175 for each Michigan adult. If current trends continue, costs associated with physical inactivity in Michigan will increase to over billion in 2007-a 42% increase in only 5 years. The dollars spent on Medicaid for physical inactivity could fund a school nurse in every public middle and high school. Source: Centers for Disease Control, 2000 The Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Michigan, Michigan Fitness Foundation 2003

29 How did we get here?

30 Our Current Lifestyle Portion Distortion Technology Replacing Physical Activity Cost Structure Cheap High Calorie Foods

31 Examples of Portion Distortion Over the last 20 years watch how portion sizes have grown.

32 Bagels 1980 Bagel 3 in.-Diameter 140 calories 2004 Bagel 6 in.- Diameter 350 calories

33 Burgers Calories 590 Calories

34 Spaghetti Small Meatballs 500 Calories 3 Large Meatballs 1025 Calories

35 Soda Oz 85 Calories 20 Oz 250 Calories

36 Fries Oz 210 Calories 6.9 Oz 610 Calories

37 What Students Eat Snack calories are increasing Source: Kids who drink soft drinks consume more calories than kids who don’t drink soft drinks Source: Only 1 in 5 Michigan high school students ate 5 servings of fruits/veggies per day Source: Only 1 in 6 Michigan high school students drank 3 glasses of milk daily (females less likely than males) Source:

38 What Students Do Nearly half of 12 to 21-year olds do not engage in vigorous physical activity on a regular basis Source: Daily participation in physical education class dropped from 42% in 1991 to 27% in 1997 Source: 43% of adolescents watch more than 2 hours of TV each day. Source: The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity

39 Overweight, Obesity and Television Studies show the highest rate of overweight and obesity in children who watch 4 or more hours of television a day. (2001) Overweight and obesity rates are the lowest among children watching an hour or less a day. (2001) 60% of overweight incidents can be linked to excessive television viewing. (2003) Source:

40 More Children are Overweight (Obese = at or above 95 th percentile BMI for age) Source: Ogden C, Flegal K, Carroll M, Johnson C. “Prevalence and Trends in Overweight Among U.S. Children and Adolescents, “ Journal of the American Medical Association 2002 Vol. 288, no.14, pp Percentage

41 The Impact on Children’s Physical Health Type 2 diabetes Cardiovascular disease risks Orthopedic problems Source: Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance Fact Sheet. Preventing Childhood Obesity: Facts and Figures (http://www.iom.edu/view.asp?id=22606)Fact Sheet. Preventing Childhood Obesity: Facts and Figures

42 The Impact on Children’s Emotional Health Low self-esteem Negative body image Depression Size discrimination Source: Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance Fact Sheet. Preventing Childhood Obesity: Facts and Figures Sheet. Preventing Childhood Obesity: Facts and Figures

43 Call To Action: What Schools Can Do 1. Create a Coordinated School Health Team (CSHT) 2.Conduct a free assessment: Healthy School Action Tool (HSAT) Source: 3. Develop and Implement Action Plan – Policy and Environment changes

44 Call To Action: What Schools Can Do Continued Adopt the Michigan State Board Of Education Policies –Policy on Coordinated School Health Programs to Support Academic Achievement and Healthy Schools, adopted September 25, –Policy on Offering Healthy Food and Beverages In Venues Outside of the Federally Regulated Child Nutrition Programs, adopted December 18, –Policy on Quality Physical Education, adopted September 25, Source: go to State Board of Education, select Policies.

45 Call to Action: What Schools Can Do Continued Utilize the “Tips and Tools To Help Implement Michigan’s Healthy Food and Beverages Policy.” Source: and click on “Tools for Action,” then “State Team Recommended Tools Database,” user name: MIAFHK, password: MIAFHK#1 Join MichiganTeam Nutrition Source: Address Physical Education hours and curriculum used. Consider using Exemplary Physical Education Curriculum (EPEC). Source: Participate in Farm to School Initiatives. Source: Page 23 of the “Tips and Tools” resource listed in the first bullet.

46 Local Success Stories "Our Health Team helped our school begin the process of a more healthy student body." We may have only taken the beginning steps, but we see progress as well as the rest of the staff and the student body.“ "As an educational institution we cannot ignore the growing concern in our country related to the health of our youth. Our Nutrition Team at NBC not only examined our needs, but took steps to address the problem locally.“ Gary Beaudoin, Principal Nellie B. Chisholm Middle School Montague, MI

47 Local Success Stories Continued Breakfast sales increased in one school after a school-wide breakfast promotion. One year after the promotion, breakfast numbers continue to improve. Two high schools have limited the hours that vending machines are operational. Gender-separate physical education and health classes now optional at one local high school to encourage lifetime fitness skills. Water, 100% fruit juice and milk machines installed at local schools. Building practice requires one school to use store bought or professionally catered food for school functions to ensure food safety. The importance of mealtime has been emphasized to students at one school by adding a third lunch period. Now students spend less time waiting in line and more time enjoying their meal. One school adopted a building practice that encourages healthy food options to students and staff in venues outside of the School Meal Program, such as non-food fundraisers and non-food classroom rewards.

48 Remember Healthy Students Perform Better Academically Increased alertness and concentration. Reduced disruptive behavior. Critical link between movement and attention /memory. Improved self esteem. Less absenteeism. Improved mood levels. Increase in energy levels. The Learning Connection: The Value of Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity in Our Schools. Source:

49 Take Action! Healthy kids make better students. Better students make healthy communities.


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