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Aim of the Seminar The Global FMD Control Strategy and the recommendations of the FMD Bangkok Conference Joseph Domenech Seminar on FMD Progressive Control.

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Presentation on theme: "Aim of the Seminar The Global FMD Control Strategy and the recommendations of the FMD Bangkok Conference Joseph Domenech Seminar on FMD Progressive Control."— Presentation transcript:

1 Aim of the Seminar The Global FMD Control Strategy and the recommendations of the FMD Bangkok Conference Joseph Domenech Seminar on FMD Progressive Control Pathway Dubai-UAE 8 April 2013

2 Aim of the Seminar - Main objective of the meeting: To get every country ready to prepare a mid term national control project/programme and present it to their government and donors. - Overall goal: To ensure a proper national commitment in order to strengthen the fight against FMD and improve the country and regional situations

3 Their situation, PCP stage, main challenges (surveillance, animal movements, vaccination…) Their ongoing control programmes Their possibility and way forward to prepare a FMD control project to be presented by the government to donors During the morning session each country will have presented

4 Their possibility to prepare a dossier to OIE for endorsement of a national control programme (PCP stage 3) or disease recognition (PCP stage 4) Their expected support from regional and international organisations

5 A summary of the Global FMD Control Stategy The OIE-FAO Middle East Regional FMD Control Strategy presented in Dubai (26 th April 2012) and in Bangkok (27-29 th June 2012) The FAO Middle East FMD Control Strategy presented in Cairo 4-5 December 2012 During the morning session the participants will also have listen

6 Therefore the participants will discuss, during the afternoon round table, the possibility to prepare a national FMD control project to be presented to the government and to donors which will consider: a)Major components of the strategy such as training, surveillance, laboratory diagnostic, socio economic studies, communication... b)Strenghthening of the Veterinary Services and legislation

7 c) Regional dimensions: buffer zones in certain countries, control of regional animal movements, regional coordination and monitoring… See the regional strategies already defined d) International dimensions: see the Global FMD Control Strategy (international coherence, support and monitoring…)

8 - Define the mid to long term project lengh: 3, 5, 10 years - Define the objectives: The ones already presented in previous regional meetings (see slides below) Or other revised objectives (in line with the Global FMD Control Strategy) These FMD control project should:

9 Fifth Steering Committee meeting April 26th 2012, Dubai, United Arab Emirates No response Other Level 0 ZoneNation al Level 5 Level 4 Level 3 Level 2 Level 1 Countries Jordan Oman Kuwait Lebanon PAT Syria Iraq KSA UAE Qatar Yemen Bahrain

10 - Follow an harmonized formate: To be discussed « logical framework » as a possible model? The FMD control project should :

11 Towards Global Control and Eradication of FMD

12 Major pillars of the FMD Control Strategy - The FMD Control Strategy combines and integrates the tools and instruments of FAO and OIE: FMD Progressive Control Pathway (PCP) in a regional context (jointly developed roadmaps) Performance of Veterinary Services Pathway (PVS), with FMD-related critical competencies worked out per PCP stage GF-TADs for governance, including acceptance of PCP Stage claimed by countries OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code, with official endorsement of a country FMD control program in PCP stage 3 or beyond OIE-recognized FMD-free status

13 - The FMD Control Strategy intends to strengthen the vital disease control supporting functions: Laboratories: national, regional, international, coordinating global lab and Networks; provision of additional expert staff Epidemiology (and economics): national teams, regional, international centers/Collaborative Centers, Networks; additional expert staff Vaccines: availability, Quality Assurance; Quality Test Centers, regional vaccine banks; correct use, vaccination planning

14 - The FMD Control Strategy supports in the more advanced FMD-PCP control stages: Emergency responses Identification of farms and animals Biosecurity Public/private partnerships - The FMD control Strategy advocates for continued research, in particular in the field of diagnostics, strain characterization, vaccines, vaccine quality control and epidemiology

15 The Progressive Control Pathway for Foot and Mouth Disease (PCP-FMD) OIE: Norms new article in the Terr. Code WAHIS WAHID Tools Laboratories Vaccines

16 Action plan Action plan was worked out in the form of typical activities At country level – for each of the PCP stages and for each of the Strategy components At regional level (for stages 1 - 5) At global level (for stages 1 – 5) The Global FMD Control Strategy and supporting documents are available on the websites

17 From concept to practice Bangkok was not a pledging conference, but over 100 countries, regional organizations, development partners and stakeholders supported the launch of the FAO/OIE Global FMD Control Strategy Typical activities indicated in the Strategy per PCP stage and for the different levels (country, regional, global) need to be embedded in concrete programmes/projects that can be used for fund raising This implies new or intensified FMD control programmes at the national level, but in a regional context, in particular in virus pool regions 3, 4, 5 and 6

18 To convince countries to step up their FMD control activities: Regional meetings in some regions or sub- regions: to develop program proposals with cost- effective combinations of activities, for instance with other regional priority TAD programmes The Global GF-TADs SC may call upon the Regional SCs and through them on the relevant regional technical and economical organisations OIE and FAO may call upon their experts in their Regional and Sub Regional Offices, ECTAD units and RAHCs

19 Presentation of the Global FMD Control Strategy at the Joint FAO/OIE Global Conference on the Control of FMD Bangkok, Thailand, June 2012

20 - The agenda, presentations and recommendations are published on the FAO and OIE websites participants, including Ministers of key countries, CVOs and other decision makers, experts, regional and international organisations, donor agencies, private sector

21 - The agenda included a technical part (State of the art) and a Donor consensus support session for donors, Reg Org. and individual countries - The participants supported the Global FMD Control Strategy

22 -To countries: 12 -To regional and global technical partners: 7 -To OIE and FAO (through the GF-TADs): 15 -To development partners: 4 -Date and venue of the third Global Conference for the control of FMD: In Africa, date to be confirmed. 39 Recommendations

23 To countries: - FMD be recognized as a high priority disease - The joint FAO/OIE Global FMD Control Strategy to be strongly supported under the GF-TADs mechanism - Countries that are not FMD-free, implement a national FMD control program using the FMD-PCP as the preferred tool - Countries use the OIE-officially endorsed FMD Control Programmes once in Stage 3 of the PCP and continue by entering the official OIE recognition pathway for FMD-free status - Countries develop the veterinary services capacity using the OIE PVS Pathway - Countries consider the good governance of veterinary services, based on an appropriate animal health legislation, veterinary education and statutory bodies

24 To countries: -Improve the surveillance, reporting and official notification using the OIE World Animal Health Information System (WAHIS/WAHID). -Rumor tracking at global level using, when appropriate, the FAO-OIE-WHO GLEWS (Global Early Warning System) - Countries make use of the existing articles of the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code

25 To regional and global technical partners: - The strengthening of the laboratory and epidemiology expertise and the networks be supported; - Global investment for reference laboratories for vaccine matching studies and services. Countries are encouraged to submit field virus strains - Regional antigen or vaccine banks be established -Independent quality control centers be established - Applied research should be conducted - Regular GF-TADs regional and global Steering Committee meetings as well as regional roadmaps meetings be organized;

26 To OIE and FAO (through the GF-TADs): - The FAO establish a robust FAO/OIE FMD Secretariat to support the FAO-OIE GF-TADs FMD Working Group; - FAO and OIE explore fund raising options, based on the conclusions of the Bangkok conference; - Assist national Veterinary Services to advocate for the political and other stakeholders support - Assist countries to assemble evidence to demonstrate impacts of early control gains - A monitoring system for the Global Strategy implementation be put in place, under the responsibility of the Global GF-TADs Steering Committee - The FMD portfolio of activities (national budget and external support) be established every 2 years - The provisional GF-TADs FMD acceptance process for the evaluation of country FMD-PCP stages be finalized; - The FAO-OIE CMC-AH and FAO-OIE-WHO GLEWS be made sustainable;

27 To OIE and FAO (through the GF-TADs) (cont.): - Institute for Animal Health, Pirbright, UK, be considered as the Global Coordinating Reference Laboratory for FMD and support for reference laboratory services be increased as well as for diagnosis laboratories at national and regional levels, including the use of twinning programmes; - International agencies pursue dialogue with relevant agencies to develop agreements that would facilitate shipping of FMD samples - OIE continue to review and update the standards for FMD in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code and Manual

28 To development partners - The international community of development partners considers funding the Global Strategy - The international community of development partners devotes special attention to (i) strengthening Veterinary Services (ii) initiate and sustain FMD control programmes in the least developed countries (iii) regional and global activities - At regional and global level, priority activities include support to: (i) surveillance and diagnostic laboratories (ii) development of FMD regional roadmaps (iii) reinforced FAO- OIE GF-TADs FMD Working Group; - Sub-regional training workshops be supported to draft country disease control plans covering a list of 3 to 5 regional/national priority diseases (including FMD). When finalized, the plans should then be presented using, when appropriate, the GF-TADs framework.

29 Thank you for your attention

30 Annex Full text of the 39 Recommendations

31 To countries: FMD be recognized as a high priority disease that should be combatted synchronously on a global scale for the benefit of all countries; FMD global control be considered as possible with existing means and methods; The joint FAO/OIE Global FMD Control Strategy and Implementing Plan – with the 3 Components – be strongly supported as the framework to engage into or continue FMD (and other animal diseases) control worldwide, under the GF-TADs mechanism when accepted by countries; All countries that are not FMD-free, develop and implement a national FMD control program using the objectives, guidance and tools of the global FMD Control Strategy with the FMD-PCP as the preferred tool when appropriate for FMD-endemic countries to design and implement the strategy and monitor progress over time; Countries use the possibility of OIE-officially endorsed FMD Control Programmes once in Stage 3 of the PCP as a recognition of the effective management of FMD control in the country and continue by entering the official OIE recognition pathway for FMD- free status whenever feasible (based on zoning or the country as a whole); The national FMD control programmes be based on robust animal health systems supported by appropriate legislation and effective public-private partnerships, and notably encourage the role of the private sector and of local communities, as key actors in FMD and other animal disease prevention and control measures; Countries develop the veterinary services capacity using the OIE PVS Pathway with improved FMD control through applying when appropriate the FMD-PCP (to create the required enabling environment), so as to ensure the sustainability of FMD (and other animal diseases) control measures put in place and to improve the economic and social resilience to major animal health events; Countries consider the good governance of veterinary services, based on an appropriate animal health legislation, veterinary education and statutory bodies, as a pre-requisite to reach the higher FMD-PCP stages (Stage 3 and beyond);

32 To countries: Countries improve the surveillance, reporting and official notification of FMD (and other animal diseases) – both in domestic and wildlife species – including immediate alert, follow-up and final reports at national and global level using the OIE World Animal Health Information System (WAHIS/WAHID). Rumor tracking is also encouraged at global level using, when appropriate, the FAO-OIE-WHO GLEWS (Global Early Warning System) reporting system as well as other regional information systems compatible with global systems. Countries make use of the existing articles of the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code to combine these with the FMD-PCP approach in the appropriate stages, in particular zoning, compartmentalization, containment and commodity-based trade and actively participate in the FMD standard setting process through their national OIE Delegate; The risk of infection from African buffalo must be considered when developing national FMD control programs. There is little evidence that other wild ungulates play a role in the maintenance of FMD and so efforts to control FMD must be regionally and locally appropriate and are best targeted at reducing or preventing the disease in domestic animals including feral animals, thus most effectively protecting both livestock and wildlife, as well as human livelihoods.

33 To regional and global technical partners: The strengthening of the laboratory and epidemiology expertise and the networks, as foreseen by the Global FMD Control Strategy, be supported; The international community, including the countries themselves, supports the Global FMD Control Strategy and in particular fund the regional support units for progressive control of FMD in each virus pool, to give the technical and other guidance required to achieve PCP progress. Within each virus pool control strategies will have to be developed to suit the epidemiology of FMD, socioeconomic status and resources available; There should be global investment in ensuring reference laboratories are equipped to perform the likely increased load for vaccine matching studies and services. Countries are encouraged to submit field virus strains for vaccine matching and to monitor the spread and emergence of new viruses; Regional antigen or vaccine banks be established when and where appropriate using existing models (i.e. FAO APHCA or OIE for Asia); Where large scale vaccination programs are launched and a number of vaccine suppliers are involved, independent quality control centers be established; Applied research should be conducted to improve vaccines, diagnostics and the understanding of infection and transmission mechanisms, to develop better spread models and determine the presence of virus in products destined for commodity trade; Regular GF-TADs regional and global Steering Committee meetings as well as regional roadmaps meetings be organized;

34 To OIE and FAO (through the GF-TADs): The FAO establish a robust FAO/OIE FMD Secretariat to support the FAO-OIE GF-TADs FMD Working Group; FAO and OIE explore fund raising options, based on the conclusions of the Bangkok conference; To enhance success of technical interventions FAO and OIE develop the necessary understanding of livelihood strategies, and the socio-economic, livestock sector and value chain factors that are integral to success of any concerted national and regional FMD control programs; For FMD control programs, key beneficiaries of the program, including farmers, farmer associations and traders be consulted at all stages of design and implementation; Based on this understanding, FAO and OIE assist national Veterinary Services to advocate for the political and other stakeholders support for appropriate FMD control activities; OIE and FAO assist countries to assemble evidence to demonstrate impacts of early control gains, so as to further secure political and other stakeholder support for FMD control; A monitoring system for the Global Strategy implementation be put in place, under the responsibility of the Global GF-TADs Steering Committee; the GF-TADs FMD WG to report on an annual basis on the global and regional progress, including where appropriate the country FMD PCP stages from regional FMD roadmaps; this information to be made available in the GF-TADs Steering Committee and the Annual Assembly of OIE Delegates; The Global Strategy be reviewed regularly and if needed updated on the basis of this monitoring work; The FMD portfolio of activities (national budget and external support) be established every 2 years by the GF-TADs FMD WG, to best support the implementation of the Global Strategy; The provisional GF-TADs FMD acceptance process, for the external evaluation of the relevant country FMD-PCP stages, be finalized; The FAO-OIE CMC-AH and FAO-OIE-WHO GLEWS be made sustainable and be continually improved, to best serve the countries;

35 To OIE and FAO (through the GF-TADs) (cont.): I nstitute for Animal Health, Pirbright, UK, be considered as the Global Coordinating Reference Laboratory for FMD, for the first phase of the Global Strategy. Support for reference laboratory services should be increased. Capacity building of FMD diagnosis at national and regional level be promoted through the network of FMD reference laboratories. Establishment of a reference laboratory should be promoted for each of the virus pool regions. Twinning programmes should be applied to speed up achievement of reference status for regional or salient national laboratories; The Global Strategy be considered as the preferred framework to develop new animal disease global control programmes under the GF-TADs mechanism and if relevant dedicated specific GF-TADs WG be set up for this purpose; International agencies pursue dialogue with IATA/ICAO and other relevant agencies such as UNCTAD and WCO, to develop agreements that would facilitate shipping of FMD samples to reference laboratories or alternative approaches to shipping virus material safely be explored; OIE continue to review and update the standards for FMD in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code and Manual to reflect the latest technical advances and in doing so to ensure that the standards of FMD for international trade purposes are only applicable to those domestic and wildlife ruminants that have been scientifically proven to be of epidemiological significance.

36 To development partners The international community of development partners considers funding the Global Strategy, on the bases of the budget presented during the Global conference; The international community of development partners devotes special attention to (i) strengthening Veterinary Services using OIE standards and guidelines, (ii) initiate and sustain FMD control programmes in the least developed countries – with particular emphasis on Africa, Asia, Middle East, Andean Region and Eastern Europe, (iii) regional and global activities to ensure the proper awareness, monitoring, resources mobilization and commitment, coordination and harmonization; At regional and global level, priority activities include support to: (i) surveillance and diagnostic laboratories including twinning programmes at all levels; (ii) development of FMD regional roadmaps where appropriate (iii) reinforced FAO-OIE GF-TADs FMD Working Group to stimulate and monitor and report on the implementation of the Global Strategy; Sub-regional training workshops be supported under agreed mechanisms with international agencies (FAO, OIE) and partners, including relevant regional organizations, to draft country disease control plans based on the results of the OIE PVS Gap Analysis. These plans covering a list of 3 to 5 regional/national priority diseases (including FMD) - as proposed by the GF-TADs Regional Steering Committees - would be prepared first at national level respecting donors requirements and, when possible, be discussed and analysed with FAO/OIE animal health and socio-economist experts. When finalised, the plans should then be presented using, when appropriate, the GF-TADs framework. The third Global Conference for the control of FMD be held in Africa (date and venue to be confirmed).


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