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Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 1 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION Developing a Portfolio Innovation Index: Beyond Patents to Economic.

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Presentation on theme: "Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 1 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION Developing a Portfolio Innovation Index: Beyond Patents to Economic."— Presentation transcript:

1 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 1 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION Developing a Portfolio Innovation Index: Beyond Patents to Economic Well-Being William P. Kittredge, Ph.D. Director, National Programs & Performance Evaluation US Department of Commerce

2 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 2 Overview Research drives the investment agenda Investment policy guidelines Performance evaluation essential Lessons from the United States Enhancing cooperation between European and US cluster policy makers

3 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 3 EDA Integrated Research Agenda Peer-review quality research –EDA Research Conference –Economic Development Quarterly publications –Arising from and building upon the academic literature Practitioner accessible reports Analytical tools and customized web-based data access Common Definitions Responsive to Practitioner Demand Know Your Region Curriculum and Website

4 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 4 Sample of Recent EDA Research Cluster-based Economic Development: A Key to Regional Competitiveness – October 1997 Unlocking Rural Competitiveness: The Role of Regional Clusters – January 2007 Gulf Coast Cluster of Opportunity – July 2007 Crossing the Next Regional Frontier: Information and Analytics Linking Regional Competitiveness to Investment in a Knowledge- Based Economy – October 2009 Green Economy Regional Innovation Systems – forthcoming Asset Mapping of Regional Innovation Clusters - forthcoming

5 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 5 Innovation – What Is It? Innovation –incremental and emergent or radical and revolutionary changes in thinking, products, processes, or organizations. –innovation, ideas applied successfully in practice Schumpeter (1934), Innovation translates brainpower into jobs and wealth. Limiting innovation measurement to patents in a services, knowledge economy is limiting. Innovation Index is our first attempt to generate an overall picture of a regions capacity to transform its economy in the global context – especially in rural and other areas not usually thought to be innovation centers

6 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 6 Innovation – A Portfolio Index Approach Innovative capacity, or inputs, can be combined with outputs to create a single, composite index value. ( ETCI 2005; Pro Inno Europe 2006; Porter and Stern 1999; Atkinson and Correa 2007) Index variables used in previous analyses (Barkley et al. 2006; Drabenstott and Henderson 2006; ETCI 2005; Pro Inno Europe 2006; Lee 2006; Atkinson and Correa 2007) Several additional variables were identified as theoretically important and investigated for possible inclusion. The final list of variables was restricted to those for which county- level data were available, or that could be developed on the county level with relatively little imputation.

7 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 7 Variable Classification Human capital Economic dynamics Productivity and employment Economic well-being State context category –composed of science and engineering graduates from state institutions per 1,000 residents of the state –R+D spending per capita

8 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 8 Inputs - Human Capital Variables suggest the extent to which a countys population and labor force are able to engage in innovative activities. Educational attainment Growth in younger age brackets of the workforce (signifying attractiveness to younger generations of workers) Number of innovation-related occupations and jobs relative to the overall labor force.

9 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 9 Inputs - Economic Dynamics The economic dynamics sub-index measures local business conditions and resources available to entrepreneurs and businesses. R&D Investment Venture Capital Investment Broadband Density Churn – creative destruction rate Business Sizes

10 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 10 Outputs - Productivity and Employment Variables in this index suggest the extent to which local and regional economies are moving up the value chain and attracting workers seeking particular jobs. High-Tech Employment Share Growth Job Growth-to-Population Growth Ratio Patent Activity Gross Domestic Product

11 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 11 Outputs - Economic Well-Being Innovative economies improve economic well-being because residents earn more and have a higher standard of living. Decreasing poverty rates, increasing employment, in-migration of new residents and improvements in personal income signal a more desirable location to live and point to an increase in economic well- being. Net Migration Compensation

12 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 12 Calculating the Indices Sub-indices for human capital, economic dynamics, productivity and employment, and economic well-being calculated by summing weighted ratios that divide the county-level metric by the U.S.-level metric (Atkinson and Correa 2007; Pro Inno Europe 2006) The Portfolio Innovation Index (PII) combines the four sub-indices –Each sub-index weighted relatively equally. –Economic well-being has a less direct relationship to innovation activities, and receives one-third the weight of the other three sub-indices.

13 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 13 Caveats Of potential concern may be the degree to which concepts or measures are related conceptually and statistically. The research team minimized correlations between factors of the PII by carefully selecting data series, calculations and measures. The Europeans have noted that their own effort to create national measures for innovation has been fraught with difficulties. For example, using indices can result in a loss of variability and explanatory power through the grouping of data. It also implies that more data are always better. Finally, using all available data ignores multicollinearity between variables and that some data are redundant (Hollanders and van Cruysen 2008). The Portfolio Innovation Index shares several of these flaws..

14 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 14 Practitioner Accessibility In order to address the issue of potentially spurious grouping of data and the loss of variability, a web-enabled database and tool was created as a part of this research project. The database and tool allow a practitioner to see the effects a particular measure (or data series) has on a county or regions overall index. As with all indices, however, the overall estimate is not as important as the sum of its parts. Economic development practitioners not only get a quick snapshot of how their region is doing in terms of innovation with the portfolio index, but they also have the ability to drill down into the highly granular data to gain a better understanding about their regions strengths and weaknesses.

15 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 15 Future Directions In the future, the state context could expand in scope to mimic several of the state-level indicators reported by Atkinson and Correa (2007) –Export of high-tech goods –Service exports –Foreign direct investment flows Bureau of Economic Analysis –Service flows reporting Empirically Based Innovation Index –index innovative activities by identifying those specific factors with the greatest influence on economic growth, while controlling for some non-innovation factors. Interpreting this index is simpler than the portfolio approach because there is only one output measureeconomic growth

16 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 16 Future Directions Augmenting the set of innovation indicators Exploring whether some indicators such as establishment churn or knowledge-based technology occupations should be broken down further into their component parts Determining empirically which indicator has the greatest influence on an output measure for innovation, such as growth in GDP per worker Exploring the influence of county characteristicse.g., size, proximity to a metro area, broadband connectivityon economic growth or rates of entrepreneurship Updating the indexes to reflect more current data as its released from the American Community Survey (all counties should be covered by ACS data by 2010)

17 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 17 Concluding Thoughts This index is, to the research teams knowledge, the first attempt to create a comprehensive innovation measure at the county-level unit of analysis in the United States, and the measure is admittedly not perfect. Imperfections aside, this index presents a state- of-the-art measure of county and regional innovation performance and capacity. This index can serve as a valuable tool for policymakers and practitioners to quickly evaluate innovative capacity and potential.

18 Economic Development Administration – 2009 – Page 18 Contact Information Full Report: William P. Kittredge, Ph.D.


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