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Building Competency with Blended Learning: Integrating Simulation into Continuing Education Julianne Perretta MSEd, RRT-NPS The Johns Hopkins Medicine.

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Presentation on theme: "Building Competency with Blended Learning: Integrating Simulation into Continuing Education Julianne Perretta MSEd, RRT-NPS The Johns Hopkins Medicine."— Presentation transcript:

1 Building Competency with Blended Learning: Integrating Simulation into Continuing Education Julianne Perretta MSEd, RRT-NPS The Johns Hopkins Medicine Simulation Center Baltimore, MD

2 Define Continuing Education Motivations for Learning Competency Assessment vs. Education Learning Styles (VARK) Questionnaire Adult Learner Characteristics (Knowles) Best Practices in Simulation Education

3 Objectives At the end of this session learners will be able to: Determine the goals of continuing education in health care Differentiate between competency assessment and education and how that affects simulation design Review key elements of adult learners Identify different learning styles and how different forms of simulation can address each Initiate simulation design based on some best practices in Simulation Education

4 Continuing Education Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality (Institute of Medicine, 2003) 1.Provide patient centered care 2.Work in interdisciplinary teams 3.Employ evidence-based practice 4.Apply quality improvement 5.Utilize informatics

5 Continuing Education Features, such as opportunities to reflect on learning and apply it to practice, and interpersonal interaction, have been identified as characteristics of CME that are most likely to result in practice enhancement -Allen, p. 234

6 Motivations for Learning Why are you here today?

7 Motivations for Learning 1.Social Relationships 2.External Expectations 3.Social Welfare 4.Professional Advancement 5.Escape/Stimulation 6.Cognitive Interest Morstain and Smart (1974), noted in Learning in adulthood.

8 Competency Assessment vs. Education Sometimes what we call education is really assessment, and what we call assessment is not that, either. What happens when we assess the quality of someones work, and they dont pass?????

9 Competency Assessment vs. Education Fail What do you do when you find a knowledge deficit? A skills deficit? How do you remediate? Reteach Reassess Performance Plan What do you do with them in the meantime?

10 Competency Assessment vs. Education eLearning Pre Assessment (study/practice) New to simulation Nervous performers Post Assessment (remediation) Specific goals based on performance Score-based Knowledge deficit Decision-making deficit Unlimited time access

11 Competency Assessment vs. Education Skills deficit Partial Task Trainers I.O. Leg IV arm Central Line Trainer Intubation head Virtual Reality

12 Adult Learners: Are more independent and self-directed Want to feel accepted, respected and supported when learning Want to feel a partnership with their instructor Have a wealth of experience they draw from when learning Want to feel they can immediately use what they are learning (problem-centered) Have many different motivations for learning Malcolm Knowles, Andragogy, 1968, 1980.

13 Simulation & the Adult Learner Work independently or with a group; use debrief to direct learning Create a environment of respect, support, and safety during simulations Dialogue between trainer and learner Build on previous experience and create new experiences Scenarios that are directly applicable to job Goal oriented learning

14 Learning Styles How a person approaches learning tasks Manner in which…learners most efficiently and effectively perceive, process, store and recall what they are attempting to learn (James and Blank, 1993, pp ). Helps you identify your strengths and weaknesses as learners

15 Learning Styles How do you learn best? VARK Multiple Intelligences(Multiple Intelligences Questionnaire: /index.html) /index.html Learning Styles Inventory (Learning Styles Inventory Questionnaire: online.com/%7Epsych/LSInventory.html)http://www.rrcc- online.com/%7Epsych/LSInventory.html

16 Learning Styles How do you learn best? Visual Aural Read/write Kinesthetic

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18 Learning Styles How do you learn best? Visual Charts graphs flow charts (arrows, circles, hierarchies) algorithms

19 Learning Styles How do you learn best? Aural Lectures Tutorials Tapes Group discussion Speaking Webchat Talking Things Through

20 Learning Styles How do you learn best? Read/write Text-based input and output List-makers

21 Learning Styles How do you learn best? Kinesthetic Practice Hands-on Examples Simulations

22 Learning Styles V- schematics, algorithms in debriefs A- Debrief discussions Interactive online (with feedback) May be better at telling you the answers than doing them R- handout and ppt debriefings Readings on evidence-based new info. K- Simulation, hands-on debriefing Can include eSimulation as well

23 Best Practices in Simulation Education Experiential Learning (Kolb) Contextual Learning (Kneebone) Situated Learning/Peripheral Participation (Lave & Wenger) Self-Efficacy and Competency (Maibach et al, Miller) Deliberate Practice (Ericcson) Feedback (Van de Ridder) Mastery Learning (Bloom) Hunt et al, 2008

24 Best Practices in Simulation Education Experiential Learning (Kolb) 1.Direct encounter with the phenomenon being studied rather than merely thinking about the encounter, or only considering the possibility of doing something about it 2.Education that occurs as a direct participation in the events of life

25 Best Practices in Simulation Education Contextual Learning (Kneebone) For learning to be most effective, it must occur within a context parallel to how individuals will apply the knowledge in their own professional practice

26 Best Practices in Simulation Education Same equipment as in unit Groups bring specific equipment BLS training for med students includes how to function with new BLS skills in hospital setting

27 Best Practices in Simulation Education Situated Learning/Peripheral Participation (Lave & Wenger) Learning through real-life participation Learners observe actions while working side-by- side with a skilled person (content expert) Begin participating in observed tasks, bringing them from periphery to participation

28 Best Practices in Simulation Education Self-Efficacy and Competency (Maibach et al) A persons belief in their capability to organize and execute a course of action to produce given attainments 4 levels of Competence: 1.Unconsciously incompetent 2.Consciously incompetent 3.Consciously competent 4.Unconsciously competent

29 Best Practices in Simulation Education Self-Efficacy and Competency (Maibach et al) Framework for assessing clinical competency (Miller) 1.Knowledge (knows) 2.Competence (knows how) 3.Performance (shows how) 4.Action (does)

30 Best Practices in Simulation Education Hybrid simulations to practice very specific skills Neonatal Chest Tube Management Patient death ECMO NP Aspirate

31 Best Practices in Simulation Education Deliberate Practice (Ericcson) Training activities that promote consistent improvements in expert performance domains Repetitive performance in a focused domain Rigorous skills assessment (specific formative feedback) Progressively improved performance in a controlled setting

32 Best Practices in Simulation Education Feedback Specific information about the comparison between a trainees observed performance and a standard, given with an intent to improve the trainees performance (Van de Ridder)

33 Best Practices in Simulation Education Build debrief tools based on agreed upon standards Debrief should be based on simulation objectives

34 Best Practices in Simulation Education Mastery Learning (Bloom) Aptitude is the length of time it takes a person to learn not how "bright" a person is, i.e., everyone can learn given the right circumstances Goal: all learners to achieve the target outcome with little/no variability; amount of time to achieve will vary based on the learners

35 Best Practices in Simulation Education eLearning Practice makes Perfect PERMANENT AHA BLS course

36 Putting it all Together Continuing education in healthcare should include: Opportunities to reflect on learning Opportunities to apply learning to practice Interpersonal interaction

37 Putting it all Together Competency assessment looks for level of knowledge/skills and identifies deficits. Focus is not on new learning. Should include avenues for remediation and opportunities for student study/practice prior

38 Putting it all Together Adult learners: Are problem-centered Have a wealth of experience to draw from Have many different motivations for learning

39 Putting it all Together Different learning styles mean people are most comfortable in a particular way. Build simulations and debriefings to meet these styles

40 Putting it all Together Key learning theories to consider when building a simulation are: Experiential Learning Contextual Learning Situated Learning/ Peripheral Participation Deliberate Practice Feedback Mastery Learning

41 Resources Allen, M., Curran, V. Ferrier, D. Ho, K., Kirby, F., Allen, J. et al (2004). Interactive on-line continuing medical education: Physicians perceptions and experiences. The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions 24 (4): Hunt, E.A., Fiedor-Hamilton, M., Eppich, W. (2008). Resuscitation education: Narrowing the gap between evidence-based resuscitation guidelines and performance using best educational practices. Pediatric Clinics of North America. 55: Institute of Medicine Health professions education: A bridge to quality. Washington, DC: The National Academy Press. Merriam, S.B., Caffarella, R.S. (1999). Learning in Adulthood. San Fransisco: Jossey Bass. Notes from a Benjamin Bloom Lecture. (1987, April). Retrieved May 15, 2009, from Smith, M.K. David A. Kolb on experiential learning. Retrieved May 1, 2009 from VARK Categories. ( ). Retrieved August 10, 2007, from VARK- A Guide to Learning Styles: learn.com/english/page.asp?p=categorieshttp://www.vark- learn.com/english/page.asp?p=categories

42 Questions? Please contact me: Julianne S. Perretta MSEd, RRT-NPS Simulation Educator The Johns Hopkins Medicine Simulation Center Baltimore, MD Simulation Educator The Johns Hopkins Medicine Simulation Center Baltimore, MD


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