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Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender. Humans: Nature and Nuture Genes and Gender Roles: Why is the nature argument.

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Presentation on theme: "Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender. Humans: Nature and Nuture Genes and Gender Roles: Why is the nature argument."— Presentation transcript:

1 Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender. Humans: Nature and Nuture Genes and Gender Roles: Why is the nature argument so appealing? Precilla Y.L. Choy Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles: Why is the nature argument so appealing?. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender, 3, Summary by: Lindsay Chisam, Griffin Gosnell, and Erin Morrissey

2 Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender. Video Clip Nature verses Nurture

3 Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender. Introduction Small differences in behaviors between men and women Nature versus nurture debate Specifically, women are more skilled at social interaction than men Opinions of Precilla Choi

4 Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender. A study of Turner’s Syndrome You all remember, right?! Only one chromosome - which one? Child develops into a female Study:  To determine whether differences would be obvious between TS individuals depending on whether their X chromosome was maternally or paternally derived Findings:  Paternally derived X chromosome yielded lower social-cognitive dysfunction than those that were maternally derived  Normal boys also scored lower on social-cognitive dysfunction than normal girls.

5 Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender. Turner’s Syndrome (continued) Explanations:  Boys are less socially skilled and more vulnerable to developmental disorders Conclusions of Skuse et al. (1997):  Evidence that the origin of the X chromosome (either maternal or paternal) plays a role in the development of sexual dimorphism in social behavior Image from: McGuffin, P. & Scourfield, J. (1997). Human genetics: A father's imprint on his daughter's thinking. Nature, 387,

6 Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender. Conclusions of Choi Gene expression depends on internal and external factors Society’s responsibility to establish an equal foundation where biology and genetics are balanced when comparing sexes The genetic makeup of chromosomes highly influences your social abilities

7 Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender. Test Questions 1. What determines sex differences?  A. Nature  B. Biology  C. Nurture  D. Both A & C 2. Turner’s Syndrome is a genetic condition in with the individual has  A. no gonads  B. no ovaries  C. two sex chromosomes, one inherited from each parent.  D. none of the above 3. Who is the least socially competent?  A. Turner’s Syndrome, maternally derived X chromosome  B. Turner’s Syndrome, paternally derived X chromosome  C. Normal girls  D. Normal boys True or false? 4. Boys are more vulnerable to developmental disorders. 5. Men are more skilled at social interaction than women. 6. Gene expression changes depend upon both the internal and external environments.

8 Choi, P.Y. (2001). Genes and gender roles. Psychology, Evolution, & Gender. Critical Review Interesting points:  Male gene is responsible for social cognizance in Turner’s Syndrome.  This is genetically derived!  Those with Turner Syndrome are even more social than most females!  For an equal society, it is necessary to see how nature and nurture intermingle and how they relate to sex differences Unclear points:  Why she talks about developmental disorders (e.g. autism) with no background information  The kind of questionnaire distributed was not discussed  She doesn’t take evolutionary changes into consideration when talking about how males will always be stronger than females


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