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Los Angeles Collaborative for Healthy Active Children.

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Presentation on theme: "Los Angeles Collaborative for Healthy Active Children."— Presentation transcript:

1 Los Angeles Collaborative for Healthy Active Children

2 LA Collaborative “Children and families of Los Angeles County are physically active, eat healthy foods, and live in communities where policies and environments promote a healthy lifestyle.” “Children and families of Los Angeles County are physically active, eat healthy foods, and live in communities where policies and environments promote a healthy lifestyle.”

3 Goals of LA Collaborative RYD Initiative  Reduce or eliminate the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages—especially soda!  Promote the consumption of water

4 What is a Sugar-Sweetened Beverage (SSB)?  Definition: Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB’s) include all beverages that contain added caloric sweeteners.  Examples: sodas fruit drinks and “juices” sport drinks energy drinks flavored milk sweetened tea and coffee rice drinks/horchata sugar cane beverages

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8 Obesity Rates are Climbing in America  Adult obesity has doubled since 1980  Since 1990 rates have increased in every state No Data <10% 10%–14 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30% Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). [Graph illustration of U.S. obesity trends by state ]. U.S. Obesity Trends. Retrieved from

9 Trend: Sweetened Drink Consumption (Jacobson, 2001) ml/day

10 Dramatic Increase in Consumption In California:  41 % of children ages 2-11 and 62% of adolescents ages drink at least one soda or other sugar-sweetened beverage every day. In LA County:  38.8% of adults and 43.3% of children consume one or more sodas or sugar-sweetened beverages EACH DAY.  Between 1977 & 2002 Americans increased their calorie intake from soft drinks by 228% Sources: LA County Health Survey, 2007 and Babey SH, Jones M, Yu H, Goldstein H. Bubbling Over: Soda Consumption and Its Link to Obesity in California. UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and California Center for Public Health Advocacy, 2009.

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12 Trend: Per Capita Soft Drink and Milk Consumption (USDA/ERS, 2003)

13 1993 Energy from beverages added to, and did not displace, energy consumed in other forms De Castro, 1993

14 1996 Daily calorie intake is higher on days when an energy- containing beverage was consumed at lunch. Mattes, 1996

15 1999 Daily Calories increase with amount of soda consumed CSFII 1994 Harnack L., 1999 Soda consumption

16 2000 Soda is the largest source of added sugar in the diet Center for Science in the Public Interest Newsroom. (1999). [Graph illustration of Where added sugar comes from]. Retrieved from

17 2009 For both adults and adolescents, rates of overweight and obesity are 18% higher among those who drink one or more sodas every day compared to those who do not drink any soda at all. Babey, S. H., Jones, M., Yu, H., & Goldstein, H. (2009). Bubbling over: Soda consumption and its link to obesity in California. UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, pp 1-8. Retrieved from

18 Health at What Cost? McDonald’s Food/Drink Options Center for Science in the Public Interest. (2000). [Graph illustration of calories in 7-eleven soft drinks]. From wallet to waistline: The hidden costs of super sizing. Retrieved from

19 Soda-Free Options  Tap water  Seltzer waters  Fat-free or low-fat milk (plain)  100% fruit juices in limited amounts  Unsweetened tea and coffee

20 Water Quality Reports  The water delivered by your local water company to your meter meets all water quality standards. However, it is important to know that your home plumbing may affect your water quality.  To find your local water quality report: LA County Department of Public Works LA County Department of Public Works California Water Services California Water Services If information for your city is not available on either of these sites, please contact your city’s Public Works department. If information for your city is not available on either of these sites, please contact your city’s Public Works department.

21 Los Angeles Collaborative for Healthy Active Children The LA Collaborative is a regional collaborative of public and private organizations involved in nutrition and physical activity promotion. Become a Member and Sign up for the Listserv!

22 For further information about the LA Collaborative please contact: Lauren Neel, MPH, CHES Coordinator, LA Collaborative Network for a Healthy California, Los Angeles Region County of Los Angeles Public Health Nutrition Program 3530 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 800 Los Angeles, CA Phone: (213)


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