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2011 Engagement Survey Results – SAIC-Frederick, Inc.

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Presentation on theme: "2011 Engagement Survey Results – SAIC-Frederick, Inc."— Presentation transcript:

1 2011 Engagement Survey Results – SAIC-Frederick, Inc.
Notes to Managers: This is the title page of your presentation Update with your Workgroup information 2011 Engagement Survey Results – SAIC-Frederick, Inc. SAIC-Frederick, Inc.

2 What will we cover in this meeting?
Your thoughts about engagement Our Workgroup’s 2011 Engagement Survey Results Ways to regularly address engagement Next steps Notes to Managers: Here is a complete table of contents of what is contained in this presentation.

3 What does High Employee Engagement Do for our organization and our customers?
How do highly engaged employees feel? Behave? What do they do differently from employees who are less engaged? How do these feelings and behaviors affect our organization and customers? What role do you think managers have in increasing and maintaining high engagement? What role do you think you have in increasing and maintaining high engagement? WHAT YOU SAY TO WORKGROUP MEMBERS: Engaged employees are critical to success for SAIC-F and our customers. Let’s talk about what that looks like. Your responses help frame the discussion we’re going through in the next hour. In live meetings say, “Tell me what your response is to (Read each question and chart the responses and discuss)” In webcast meetings have participants type their responses in the comments section.

4 The Three Types of Employees
28% 53% 19% WHAT YOU SAY TO WORKGROUP MEMBERS: Gallup research has shown that those individuals in the Engaged category are strongly connected to the organization they work for. They tend to be more productive and are loyal to their organization. The employees in the Not Engaged category are not as enthusiastic about the company they work for, they tend to be a bit indifferent to their employer as a whole, they do their job and do what they are told to do but will not go above and beyond the call of duty. The final group is what Gallup calls the Actively Disengaged . These employees are very unhappy with their work environment and tend to work against the organization by creating negativity in their environments and attempting to recruit others into their negative thinking. As you work with this data keep the following things in mind: Avoid the danger of labeling. Think of these groups of employees like this: Most employees join companies with hopes and dreams for a great experience; most employees come to work with good intentions; and most employees WANT to do a good job, contribute, and be recognized & appreciated for it . For Engaged employees, things are going right. They are right there, ready to be your role models, cheerleaders, tone setters, culture drivers. Not Engaged employees are frequently on the fence, but they need something to change. They have the most potential and are most responsive to actions toward change. They want action and help to become engaged. Actively Disengaged didn’t join the company that way, but something has been lost or happened along the way. Give them the benefit of the doubt and work with them to jointly create a working culture that they want to become part of – or eventually select out. Engaged Not Engaged Actively Disengaged Loyal and psychologically committed. More productive, higher retention. Productive, but they are not psychologically connected to their company. Miss more workdays, more likely to leave. Physically present, but psychologically absent. Unhappy and insist on sharing this unhappiness with others. Based on Gallup Poll: US Working Population 2010 Copyright ® 2008 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 4

5 SAIC’s Engagement Index Over Time
Ratio* of Engaged to Actively Disengaged: Recommendation is a 4.00:1 ratio 2.00:1 3.36:1 3.08:1 3.38:1 WHAT YOU SAY TO WORKGROUP MEMBERS: This slide show the trending Engagement Index for SAIC over the last three employee surveys. As you can see, SAIC experienced good movement from 2007 to 2009, however, in 2011 the results were nearly identical to the results of We don’t have separate results for SAIC-Frederick or our Directorate. This year’s results (2011) show that 37% of the population at SAIC is categorized as Engaged, 51% as Not Engaged, and 12% as Actively Disengaged. Gallup’s research indicates that for an organization to offset the negative effects of one actively disengaged employee it takes about 4 engaged employees. It is, therefore, recommended that an organization aim to achieve a 4.00:1 ratio. SAIC currently has a ratio of 3.08:1 ration. This means there are just over three (3) engaged employees for every one (1) actively disengaged employee. * The Engagement Ratio calculates the percentage of employees who fall into one of three categories: Engaged, Not Engaged, and Actively Disengaged 5 Copyright © 2011 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.

6 How do we measure engagement
How do we measure engagement? Our workgroup’s results for Q12 & SAIC-Specific Questions: Notes to Managers: USE THIS PAGE IF YOU HAVE 2009 RESULTS FOR COMPARISON AND DELETE NEXT SLIDE. If your report showed no 2009 results for your team, it is because you are a manager who did not receive a report in 2009 because we have extended the organization level for which managers get reports. To populate the excel spreadsheet with your 2009 data, double click on the spreadsheet and the Excel spreadsheet will appear. Enter your data. The delta will be automatically calculated. Here is where you share the results from your report. There are important questions to ask (see notes below) and you may want to chart their answers. Gallup says that any delta that is .20 shows a meaningful difference – enough people feel differently that they may behave differently and will share their viewpoints strongly with others, thus possibly changing their opinions. Gallup’s official definition for “meaningful difference is” “A delta of .20 shows a meaningful difference in ratings between one group and another at the organizational level, or one rating administration and another  over a period of time.  (Gallup indicates) a delta of this size may be an early indicator that behavior or perceptions within the work environment have changed enough to create a meaningful change in perception regarding this item.   Therefore, changes in this size should be explored further to identify positive elements as well as barriers that are affecting those items.” IF YOU HAVE ANY .20 DELTAS: It might be wise to spend some time soliciting potential reasons for the .20 difference questions and why there was a change. The Q12 questions are constant and will have Gallup 50th% benchmark data. The SAIC questions were patterned after other Gallup database questions but some were changed enough by SAIC leaders to not have benchmark data. The SAIC results column shows the overall SAIC results which are a rollup of all SAIC report results. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ WHAT YOU SAY TO WORKGROUP MEMBERS: Here are our actual results. Take a minute and look at Column B - the 2011 results. They are compared with our 2009 results in column A. We can also see the SAIC company-wide results which are a rollup of all results in the company in Column D. IF YOU HAVE 2009 data say: Let’s look at where our results have changed. A delta of .20 shows a meaningful difference in ratings which may be an early indicator that behavior or perceptions within the work environment have changed enough to create a meaningful change in perception regarding this item. Let’s look at where we have significant differences with SAIC overall results. IIMPORTANT QUESTIONS TO ASK AND CHART THEIR RESPONSES: Do our survey results on any of these questions surprise you? What are we doing right to get our highest ratings? What would you like to see us do differently on our lowest rated questions? What can we do to regularly address engagement?

7 How do we measure engagement
How do we measure engagement? Our workgroup’s results for Q12 & SAIC-Specific Questions: Notes to Managers: USE THIS PAGE IF YOU DO NOT HAVE 2009 RESULTS FOR COMPARISON AND DELETE PREVIOUS SLIDE. If your report showed no 2009 results for your team, it is because you are a manager who did not receive a report in 2009 because we have extended the organization level for which managers get reports. If SAIC-F had no score for a question in 2009 it is noted as N/A To populate the excel spreadsheet with your 2009 data, double click on the spreadsheet and the Excel spreadsheet will appear. Enter your data. The delta will be automatically calculated. Here is where you share the results from your report. There are important questions to ask (see notes below) and you may want to chart their answers. Gallup says that any delta that is .20 shows a meaningful difference – enough people feel differently that they may behave differently and will share their viewpoints strongly with others, thus possibly changing their opinions. Gallup’s official definition for “meaningful difference is” “A delta of .20 shows a meaningful difference in ratings between one group and another at the organizational level, or one rating administration and another  over a period of time.  (Gallup indicates) a delta of this size may be an early indicator that behavior or perceptions within the work environment have changed enough to create a meaningful change in perception regarding this item.   Therefore, changes in this size should be explored further to identify positive elements as well as barriers that are affecting those items.” IF YOU HAVE ANY .20 DELTAS: It might be wise to spend some time soliciting potential reasons for the .20 difference questions and why there was a change. The Q12 questions are constant and will have Gallup 50th% benchmark data. The SAIC questions were patterned after other Gallup database questions but some were changed enough by SAIC leaders to not have benchmark data. The SAIC results column shows the overall SAIC results which are a rollup of all SAIC report results. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ WHAT YOU SAY TO WORKGROUP MEMBERS: Here are our actual results. Take a minute and look at Column B - the 2011 results. They are compared with our 2009 results in column A. We can also see the SAIC company-wide results which are a rollup of all results in the company in Column D. IF YOU HAVE 2009 data say: Let’s look at where our results have changed. A delta of .20 shows a meaningful difference in ratings which may be an early indicator that behavior or perceptions within the work environment have changed enough to create a meaningful change in perception regarding this item. Let’s look at where we have significant differences with SAIC overall results. IIMPORTANT QUESTIONS TO ASK AND CHART THEIR RESPONSES: Do our survey results on any of these questions surprise you? What are we doing right to get our highest ratings? What would you like to see us do differently on our lowest rated questions? What can we do to regularly address engagement?

8 What do some specific questions mean?
To choose the questions most important to your team or for more complete descriptions of all the Q12 go to this link and select them: https://issaic.saic.com/aboutsaic/gallup/ The following 2 questions are frequently the most confusing so we provided them here. Q05. My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person. Remember, people leave managers, not companies. A productive workplace is one in which people feel safe – safe enough to experiment, to challenge, to share information, to support each other, and where the team members are prepared to give the manager and the organization the “benefit of the doubt.” None of this can happen if team members so not feel cared about. Relationships are the glue that holds great workplaces together. Q10. I have a “best friend” at work. Why “best friend”? Why does it matter if I have a “best friend” at work? “I have a best friend at work” is really a proxy for trust. We are interested only in whether there is a person at work whom you would consider a best friend “at work”. Think about people whom you would consider “best friends.” People with whom you share values, you can trust, and who are watching out for you. You are going to feel more confident in making decisions, taking risks, and being more productive because you don’t have to spend a lot of time watching your back. Chances are, you’re going to feel like there is more open communication within your team. Notes to Managers: If you know in advance that your workgroup has questions or issues with any survey question in particular, go to the link sited on this slide and open the PowerPoint document titled, “Gallup Q12 Definitions.” These are definition slides for each of the Q12 that can be inserted into your presentation. We have provided further explanation of the two Gallup questions that are frequently the most confusing or require the most further discussion for your convenience. If you do use this slide, remove the text above Q05. As another option, you may also just want to insert slides with the further definitions or descriptions of each of the questions and you can quickly move through those slides if your workgroup does not need further discussion on them. ________________________________________________________________ WHAT YOU SAY TO WORKGROUP MEMBERS: Let’s discuss and look at particular questions that: You have questions about what they mean. That we have high engagement in; lower engagement.

9 What do you think of our results?
Do our survey results on any of these questions surprise you? What are we doing right to get our highest ratings? What would you like to see us do differently on our lowest rated questions? Are there any issues we should address immediately? What are some things we can do to regularly address engagement? Notes to Managers: This slide and its questions are inserted to ensure that these important questions are asked since they are the dialogue foundation for increasing engagement in your workgroup. If you didn’t ask them in connection with the previous slide of your total ratings, please ask them now. Chart all responses. VERY IMPORTANT: Act upon whatever is charted for #4 & #5!!!!!!!!! If there are immediate actions that need a team to address, help form that team and help them develop a project plan to get results quickly. Also remember that the whole workgroup should be working together as much as possible. If there are action items that are specific to you as a manager, act on them quickly. If engagement can be developed more completely by giving power to other workgroup members to address, help make that happen. ________________________________________________________________ WHAT YOU SAY TO WORKGROUP MEMBERS: Let’s discuss these important questions. They form the foundation for how we can improve engagement in our workgroup.

10 How do you feel about this meeting?
How well informed do you feel about our results? What did you like about how this meeting went? What would you have liked more of in this meeting? Less of? How do you feel about the actions we will take to regularly address engagement? Notes to Managers: To model good engagement behavior, it would be beneficial to evaluate the effectiveness of this meeting about engagement. Chart the responses to these questions ________________________________________________________________ WHAT YOU SAY TO WORKGROUP MEMBERS: How well informed do you feel about our results? How do you feel about the progress we’ve made today toward addressing our results? What did you like about this meeting and how it was conducted? What would you like more of in future meetings? Less of?


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