Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chapter 14 THE Roaring 20’s & the JAZZ AGE Section 1: Boom Times Section 2: Life in the Twenties Section 3: A Creative Era.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chapter 14 THE Roaring 20’s & the JAZZ AGE Section 1: Boom Times Section 2: Life in the Twenties Section 3: A Creative Era."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Chapter 14 THE Roaring 20’s & the JAZZ AGE Section 1: Boom Times Section 2: Life in the Twenties Section 3: A Creative Era

3 Objectives: How did the economic boom affect consumers and American businesses? How did the economic boom affect consumers and American businesses? How did the assembly line spur the growth of the automobile industry? How did the assembly line spur the growth of the automobile industry? How did Henry Ford change working conditions during the 1920s? How did Henry Ford change working conditions during the 1920s? How did widespread automobile use affect the daily lives of many Americans? How did widespread automobile use affect the daily lives of many Americans? How did American industries encourage changes in consumer practices? How did American industries encourage changes in consumer practices? Section 1: Boom Times

4 3 Social Tensions CityCountry (rural) FORAGAINST Alcohol Gambling Promiscuity Science & technology Entertainment & Play Religion

5 Effects on consumers Wage increases for workers increased their purchasing power. Wage increases for workers increased their purchasing power. Increased consumer demand led to the development of new products. Increased consumer demand led to the development of new products. Electricity became more available. Electricity became more available. Section 1: Boom Times

6 Effects on business Businesses used scientific management to increase productivity. Businesses used scientific management to increase productivity. Factories became more efficient. Factories became more efficient. Section 1: Boom Times

7

8 The assembly line cut production time and costs cut production time and costs enabled reductions in price enabled reductions in price allowed more consumers to buy cars allowed more consumers to buy cars Section 1: Boom Times

9 Changes made by Henry Ford developed the assembly line developed the assembly line increased productivity but work became repetitive increased productivity but work became repetitive increased wages increased wages shortened the workday shortened the workday Section 1: Boom Times

10 The automobile’s effect on daily lives linked rural areas to urban areas; contributed to growth of suburbs linked rural areas to urban areas; contributed to growth of suburbs use of trains and trolley cars reduced; horse-drawn vehicles replaced use of trains and trolley cars reduced; horse-drawn vehicles replaced growth in popularity of auto-touring growth in popularity of auto-touring new social opportunities for teenagers new social opportunities for teenagers reduced sense of community reduced sense of community Section 1: Boom Times

11 Changing consumer practices offering of installment plans offering of installment plans introduction of new materials and designs introduction of new materials and designs use of advertising use of advertising beginning of planned obsolescence beginning of planned obsolescence establishment of retail chain stores establishment of retail chain stores Section 1: Boom Times

12 SECTION 1 Boom Times new materials and designsadvertising retail chain stores planned obsolescence installment plan CHANGING CONSUMER PRACTICES

13 Objectives: What impact did prohibition have on crime? What impact did prohibition have on crime? What were the characteristics of the new youth culture? What were the characteristics of the new youth culture? How did celebrities and new forms of popular entertainment help create a mass culture? How did celebrities and new forms of popular entertainment help create a mass culture? What did the religious movements of the 1920s and the Scopes trial reveal about American society? What did the religious movements of the 1920s and the Scopes trial reveal about American society? Section 2: Life in the Twenties

14 Prohibition’s impact on crime Prohibition of alcohol increased crime by creating an illegal market that manifested in speakeasies, bootlegging, and people making their own liquor. Section 2: Life in the Twenties

15 Prohibition th amendment -prohibits 21st amendment repeals Some Key terms Speakeasies - place where liquor was sold illegally

16

17

18 Bootlegging A wide variety of home made and in many cases dangerous liquors appeared. A wide variety of home made and in many cases dangerous liquors appeared.

19 Take a look Jack Brandy Made in Virginia, made of peaches and caused fingernails to bleed Monkey RumMade from molasses Goat WhiskeyIndiana Rye Sap Whiskey Midwest Soda Pop MoonPhiladelphia YackYack Bourbon Made from iodine and burnt sugar

20 A fellow named Henry S. rented a saloon where he could sell soda pop and malt over the bar. If a customer asked for beer, Henry would take a shot of moonshine, pour it into the malt, hit the bottle with a rubber mallet and the moonshine and malt would mix to make beer. This bottle of moonshine was kept on a trap door behind the bar. A string was attached to the door which could be pulled from any place behind the bar. If any federals, or suspicious looking persons came in, Henry could pull the string, the trap door would open, the bottle would fall down onto a pile of rocks in the cellar and the evidence was gone.

21 Characteristics of the youth culture The “new woman” sought social and economic independence. The “new woman” sought social and economic independence. College enrollment tripled. College enrollment tripled. New fashions were worn. New fashions were worn. New leisure activities such as dance marathons and flagpole sitting became popular. New leisure activities such as dance marathons and flagpole sitting became popular. Section 2: Life in the Twenties

22 Creation of a mass culture Radio, books, and magazines allowed people to share ideas, information, and entertainment. Radio, books, and magazines allowed people to share ideas, information, and entertainment. Movies and sports gave common cultural experiences. Movies and sports gave common cultural experiences. Celebrities and heroes allowed people to share common acquaintances. Celebrities and heroes allowed people to share common acquaintances. Section 2: Life in the Twenties

23

24 American society Americans had different opinions about social change. Americans had different opinions about social change. There was a deep division between traditional religious values and new values based on scientific thought. There was a deep division between traditional religious values and new values based on scientific thought. There were different values about what was appropriate in movies and radio. There were different values about what was appropriate in movies and radio. Section 2: Life in the Twenties

25 Women Flappers - named for women of the 20’s adopting new styles including the “bob” hair style, smoking cigs and drinking and wearing the shorter skirt Flappers - named for women of the 20’s adopting new styles including the “bob” hair style, smoking cigs and drinking and wearing the shorter skirt The skirt change was understandable The skirt change was understandable why? why?

26 Women The long dress The long dress collected too much collected too much street dirt street dirt WW1 used a lot WW1 used a lot of fabric for war of fabric for war creating a shortage creating a shortage

27 flappers

28 Education 1914 ½ million HS STUDENTS 1914 ½ million HS STUDENTS MILLION MILLION Why? Why? There were better jobs to be gained by education in the industries There were better jobs to be gained by education in the industries Taxes helped pay for schools Taxes helped pay for schools

29 In the News Lindberg 33 ½ hours from NY to Paris 33 ½ hours from NY to Paris 25 years old 25 years old Spirit of St. Louis Spirit of St. Louis Left Long Island and landed at an airfield in France with 50,000 people waiting for him Left Long Island and landed at an airfield in France with 50,000 people waiting for him Reason for flying: $25,000 prize since 1919 Reason for flying: $25,000 prize since 1919

30 Famous Photo

31 The flight 451 gallons of fuel 451 gallons of fuel Bad weather –made him consider turning back over New Foundland –sleet and hard rain Bad weather –made him consider turning back over New Foundland –sleet and hard rain used a periscope to see where he was going used a periscope to see where he was going Took 34 hours Took 34 hours d

32 Only real danger was at night Only real danger was at night Key instrument was earth indicator compass- based on earth’s magnetic field to airplanes magnetic field Key instrument was earth indicator compass- based on earth’s magnetic field to airplanes magnetic field 1 st time he passed up the airfield 1 st time he passed up the airfield Became known as Lucky Lindy Became known as Lucky Lindy The flight

33 Babe Ruth world series world series 1923 –built new stadium – House that Ruth built 1923 –built new stadium – House that Ruth built 1948 set up foundation to help under privileged kids 1948 set up foundation to help under privileged kids

34

35 Sports Black Sox scandal of 1919 The Babe brought people back to the ball park after this scandal kept them away Black Sox scandal of 1919 The Babe brought people back to the ball park after this scandal kept them away Eight players were accused of fixing the world series and throwing the series Eight players were accused of fixing the world series and throwing the series A jury found them innocent but Commissioner Landis banned the 8 players anyway A jury found them innocent but Commissioner Landis banned the 8 players anyway

36

37 Shoeless Joe Jackson

38 Red Grange Helped popularize football in the Midwest at Western Illinois

39

40 Knute Rockne Legendary Irish football coach for Notre Dame college in Indiana Legendary Irish football coach for Notre Dame college in Indiana

41 4 horsemen of Notre Dame

42 Jack Dempsey vs Gene Tunney Dempsey was the Manassa Mauler Dempsey was the Manassa Mauler 2 great fights both won by Tunney – eventually led to 1 million dollar purses 2 great fights both won by Tunney – eventually led to 1 million dollar purses

43

44 A then-record crowd of 120,757, which paid a then- record live gate of $1.8 million, packed Sesquicentennial Stadium on Sep. 23, 1926 and braved a driving rainstorm to watch the biggest and most anticipated sporting event in history.

45 Bobby Jones Only golfer to wins golf’s grand slam in the same year He was an amateur –he was independently wealthy

46 Man O War Triple crown champion

47 Entertainment and Writers Charlie Chaplin Charlie Chaplin Al Jolson – starred in Jazz Singer – the first movie with sound was in 1927 Al Jolson – starred in Jazz Singer – the first movie with sound was in 1927 Writers wrote against materialism Writers wrote against materialism F Scott Fitzgerald F Scott Fitzgerald

48 Women -1920’s- Suffrage Women’s contribution of WW 1 led to the 19th amendment and voting rights in Women’s contribution of WW 1 led to the 19th amendment and voting rights in Alice Paul and Lucy Burns formed the National Woman's party and held parades and marches Alice Paul and Lucy Burns formed the National Woman's party and held parades and marches The amendment was named the Anthony amendment after Susan B Anthony The amendment was named the Anthony amendment after Susan B Anthony

49 SECTION 2 Life in the Twenties moviessportsradio books and magazines celebrities and heroes SHARED CULTURAL EXPERIENCES

50 Objectives: How did jazz and blues become popular nationwide? How did jazz and blues become popular nationwide? What impact did the Harlem Renaissance have on American society? What impact did the Harlem Renaissance have on American society? How did writers of the Lost Generation portray American life? How did writers of the Lost Generation portray American life? What were some of the major inspirations behind new movements in the visual arts and architecture? What were some of the major inspirations behind new movements in the visual arts and architecture? Section 3: A Creative Era

51 The popularity of jazz and blues originated in the South originated in the South spread nationwide as musicians moved north spread nationwide as musicians moved north began to be played by white musicians also began to be played by white musicians also popularized in jazz clubs and by big bands popularized in jazz clubs and by big bands Section 3: A Creative Era

52 Impact of the Harlem Renaissance source of pride for African Americans source of pride for African Americans new respect for black theater new respect for black theater celebration of ethnic identity celebration of ethnic identity exposure of African American struggles exposure of African American struggles Section 3: A Creative Era

53 Black Renaissance Fueled by: Fueled by: Population shift from South to North Population shift from South to North a] Henry Ford opens the assembly line to a] Henry Ford opens the assembly line to Black workers in 1914 Black workers in 1914 b] boll weevil destroys cotton fields in 1914 b] boll weevil destroys cotton fields in 1914

54 Harlem Renaissance Center for the nations black intellectuals including cultural, music, literature, dance, drama and painting Center for the nations black intellectuals including cultural, music, literature, dance, drama and painting

55

56 Louis Armstrong Trumpeter that helped along with King Oliver bring about jazz Trumpeter that helped along with King Oliver bring about jazz Traveled North of the Mason Dixon Line Traveled North of the Mason Dixon Line Along with Duke Ellington(Harlem 1923) helped create the Jazz sound Along with Duke Ellington(Harlem 1923) helped create the Jazz sound

57 Josephine Baker Lived in Paris as a singer and dancer Lived in Paris as a singer and dancer

58 During World War I The Chicago Defender started an aggressive (and successful) campaign in support of "The Great Migration" movement. This movement resulted in over 1,500,000 southern blacks migrating to the North between The Defender spoke of the difficulties in the South and praised life in the North. Job listings and train schedules were posted to facilitate the relocation. The Defender's support of the movement caused southern readers to migrate to the North in record numbers. At least 110,000 came to Chicago alone between Founder Robert Abbott

59 Racial Tensions Chicago Riots Chicago Riots 1919 – a 17 yr. Old black swimmer crossed from the Lake Michigan black beach to the white beach while swimming 1919 – a 17 yr. Old black swimmer crossed from the Lake Michigan black beach to the white beach while swimming White bathers threw rocks at him until he drowned White bathers threw rocks at him until he drowned That led to riots which killed That led to riots which killed 23 blacks, 15whites and injured blacks, 15whites and injured 520

60 W.E.B. DuboisBooker T Washington Militant black leader who wanted to strive for higher education goals and equality immediately. Helped found the NAACP. At this time, blacks had little role in either Political party Founded the Tuskegee Institute to gain skills for African Americans to gain trades and an economic freedom first before pressing for political gains

61 Marcus Garvey Started the UNIA (Universal Negro Improvement Association) from his native Jamaica and he enrolled ½ million Americans Started the UNIA (Universal Negro Improvement Association) from his native Jamaica and he enrolled ½ million Americans Started the Back to Africa Movement Started the Back to Africa Movement Started the Black is beautiful theme Started the Black is beautiful theme

62 James Weldon Johnson African American – a lawyer African American – a lawyer Introduced anti lynching law to Congress because between there were 3,224 lynching without a trial Introduced anti lynching law to Congress because between there were 3,224 lynching without a trial Ida Wells Barnett helped establish an anti lynching league Ida Wells Barnett helped establish an anti lynching league

63 Life as portrayed by the Lost Generation writers War was devastating and useless. War was devastating and useless. College life was superficial. College life was superficial. Pursuit of wealth and status led to emptiness. Pursuit of wealth and status led to emptiness. Middle-class life was empty and required conformity. Middle-class life was empty and required conformity. Section 3: A Creative Era

64 Inspirations for the visual arts and architecture urban and industrial settings urban and industrial settings nobility of workers nobility of workers tyranny of the wealthy tyranny of the wealthy Sullivan’s ideas about form and function Sullivan’s ideas about form and function Frank Lloyd Wright’s “prairie style” Frank Lloyd Wright’s “prairie style” Section 3: A Creative Era

65 SECTION 3 A Creative Era PORTRAYAL OF AMERICAN LIFE BY LOST GENERATION WRITERS Ernest Hemingway F. Scott Fitzgerald Sinclair Lewis showed the devastation and uselessness of war revealed superficiality of college life and the emptiness associated with the pursuit of status and wealth discussed the emptiness and conformity of middle-class life


Download ppt "Chapter 14 THE Roaring 20’s & the JAZZ AGE Section 1: Boom Times Section 2: Life in the Twenties Section 3: A Creative Era."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google