Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Head Start Arizona Head Start.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Head Start Arizona Head Start."— Presentation transcript:

1 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Head Start Arizona Head Start TTA Office Infant Toddler Summer Webinar Series: Infant Toddler Self-Regulation (developed from Brain Wonders, a Zero-to-Three presentation) Mary Kramer Reinwasser, M.Ed. Arizona State-Based TTA Manager

2 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Agenda 2 Definition of self-regulation Infant states of arousal Responsive caregiving impact on self-regulation Developmental tasks of infancy and toddlerhood Development of self-control Self-regulation milestones in infants and toddlers

3 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Learning Outcomes 1. Participants will be able to define self-regulation. 2. Participants will be able to name that states of arousal and alertness. 3. Participants will be able to describe appropriate expectations for self-regulation in infants and toddlers. 3

4 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network 4 What Is Self-Regulation? Definition –Intrinsic and extrinsic processes responsible for identifying, supervising, evaluating, and altering emotional reactions (Thompson, 1994). Function –To manage arousal, control behaviors and reactions, and thereby define and adjust interactions to fit both individual and social demands. –If unable to master the task of emotion regulation, “deleterious emotional arousal and the misleading identification and misdirection of emotions” (Kostuik & Fouts, 2002) can result, possibly leading to socially inappropriate behaviors and a limited ability to adapt to spontaneous experiences.

5 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Temperament Styles Easy children are calm, happy, adaptable, regular in sleeping and eating habits, positive in mood and interested in new experiences. Difficult children are often fussy, irregular in feeding and sleeping habits, low in adaptability, fearful of new people and situations, easily upset, high strung, and intense in their reactions. Slow to warm up children are relatively inactive, reflective, tend to withdraw or to react negatively to novelty, but their reactions gradually become more positive with experience. 5

6 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Parenting Styles Authoritarian Authoritative Permissive Uninvolved 6

7 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Developmental Tasks of Infancy Sources of Developmental Tasks Tasks that arise from physical maturation Tasks that from personal sources. Tasks that have their source in the pressures of society Development tasks Maturation of Sensory and Motor Functions Social Attachment Sensorimotor Intelligence Object Permanence Emotional Development Psychosocial Crisis

8 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network 8 Messages Infants Receive from Caregivers I am listened to. What I choose to do is valued. How I express my emotions is accepted. I am allowed to explore. My needs are mostly met. Source: Lally, J. R.

9 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network 9 Infants “Feel Felt” in Responsive Relationships “’Feeling felt’ may be an essential ingredient in attachment relationships. Having the sense that someone else feels one’s feelings and is able to respond contingently to one’s communication may be vital to close relationships....” Siegel, D. J. (1999). The developing mind: How relationships and the brain interact to shape who we are. New York: The Guilford Press.

10 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network 10 What Do We Mean When We Say a Caregiver is Responsive to an Infant?  Contingent  Appropriate  Prompt Source: Bornstein, M, & Bornstein, H. (1995). Caregivers’ responsiveness and cognitive development in infants and toddlers: Theory and research. In P. L. Mangione (Ed.), Infant/toddler caregiving: A guide to cognitive development and learning. Sacramento: CDE Press.

11 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network 11 The Importance of Self-Regulation The growth of self-regulation is a cornerstone of early childhood development that cuts across all domains of behavior. Shonkoff, J. P., & Phillips, D. A. (2000). From neurons to neighborhoods: The science of early childhood development. National Academy of Sciences.

12 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network 12 Responsive Care Helps Infants to Regulate “... Effective regulation of the infant is only possible within a supportive caregiving system.... By providing appropriate and changing stimulation in response to perceptions of infant state, moods, and interests, caregivers not only help keep arousal within manageable bounds, but they also entrain the infant’s own capacities for regulation.” Sroufe, L. A., Egeland, B., Carlson, E. A., & Collins, W. A. (2005). The development of the person: The Minnesota study of risk and adaptation from birth to adulthood. New York: The Guilford Press.

13 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network 13 Responsive Caregivers Guide Toddlers’ Self- Regulation “...the adaptation of the toddler period remains fundamentally a dyadic adaptation.... as [is] true for infants, toddlers require responsive and consistent involvement by caregivers to remain regulated.... [Toddlers] are not capable of self regulation, but within a supportive relationship, they are capable of ‘guided self-regulation’.” Sroufe, L. A., Egeland, B., Carlson, E. A., & Collins, W. A. (2005). The development of the person: The Minnesota study of risk and adaptation from birth to adulthood. New York: The Guilford Press.

14 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network 14 Infant States of Arousal Regular sleep Irregular sleep Periodic sleep Drowsiness Alert inactivity Waking activity

15 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Milestones 15 MonthsMilestones Birth -12 Begins to be able to calm self for brief periods by sucking, staring, etc Continually needs help to avoid danger By 12 mos, may begin to “expect to be stopped” Begins to express desire for individuality “No” & tantrums are frequent expressions of desire to be independent Follows “rules” about 45% of the time Shows concern when things don’t look “right” – e.g., broken toy, damaged stuff May show pride in action (e.g., cleaning up a mess) Is able to follow internalized rules some of the time, but has a hard time with “transfer” Uses social referencing to regulate behavior Still relies on caregivers for help in following rules or containing impulses – may act out if no one is watching May exhibit guilt 36-48Has internalized rules involving “dos” &”don’ts” May argue about what s/he is supposed to do Negativism wanes and child complies about 80% of the time Uses private or inner speech to help remember rules & standards

16 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network 16 Indicators of Self-Control 1.Control of impulses 2.Tolerance of frustration 3.The ability to postpone immediate gratification 4.The initiation of a plan that is carried out over a period of time

17 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network 17 Sequence of Self- Control Development Birth to approximately 12 months: Voluntary motor acts evolve from earlier reflexive activity. This activity can be modulated but not always consciously. 12 to about 24 months: increased motor and language skills makes it possible for the child to respond to the demands of adults. Children at this age are susceptible to control by others. Approximately 24 months: marks the actual beginnings of self- control due to the ability to recall instructions and behaviors Approximately 36 months: With age, the ability to delay gratification begins to emerge.

18 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Responsive Caregivers Guide Toddlers’ Self-Regulation Think about how your own temperament style meshes with your child's temperamental style. Be attuned to your child's temperament and encourage her to accomplish tasks at her own pace. Make your expectations clear. Setting limits will help your child develop self control. Encourage children to work with you on generating solutions to problems. Make communication a priority. Be open to discussion; take time to explain your decisions and motives and listen to your children's point of view. Make them aware that their opinions are respected, but remain firm in your decisions. Respect each child's individual strengths and don't compare children. 18

19 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Supporting self-regulatory skills Provide a structured and predictable daily routine and schedule Change the environment by eliminating distractions: turn off the T.V., dim lights, or provide a soothing object (like a teddy bear or photo of Mom) when you sense a child is becoming upset Role play with the child how to act or what to say in certain situations Teach and talk about feelings and review home/classroom rules regularly Allow children to let off steam by creating a quiet corner with a small tent or pile of pillows 19

20 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Supporting self-regulatory skills Encourage pretend play scenarios among preschoolers Stay calm and firm in your voice and actions even when a child is "out of control" Anticipate transitions and provide ample warning to the child or use picture schedules or a timer to warn of transitions Re-direct inappropriate words or actions when needed In the classroom or at play groups pair children with limited self-regulatory skills with those who have good self-regulatory skills as a peer model Take a break yourself when needed, as children with limited self-regulatory skills can try an adult's patience 20

21 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Supporting self-regulatory skills Think about how your own temperament style meshes with your child's temperamental style. Be attuned to your child's temperament and encourage her to accomplish tasks at her own pace. Make your expectations clear. Setting limits will help your child develop self control. Encourage children to work with you on generating solutions to problems. Make communication a priority. Be open to discussion; take time to explain your decisions and motives and listen to your children's point of view. Make them aware that their opinions are respected, but remain firm in your decisions. Respect each child's individual strengths and don't compare children. 21

22 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Questions 22

23 Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network The Arizona Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Office and STG International thank you for joining our webinar today! Please continue to join the 2010 Summer Webinar Series occurring every Tuesday and Thursday during the months of June and July at 3:00 Pacific Daylight Time. Please contact Mary Kramer Reinwasser at for more information. 23


Download ppt "Head Start State-based T/TA Office for Arizona A member of the National Head Start Training and Technical Assistance Network Head Start Arizona Head Start."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google