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Enumclaw Fire Department Initial/Annual Safety Training.

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Presentation on theme: "Enumclaw Fire Department Initial/Annual Safety Training."— Presentation transcript:

1 Enumclaw Fire Department Initial/Annual Safety Training

2 Course Objectives After completing this course, the student will be able to: Describe how and when to report injuries (WAC ) Locate first-aid facilities in the Fire Station (WAC ) Locate Emergency Exits (WAC ) After completing this course, the student will have an basic knowledge of: Emergency Procedures while at Fire Stations (WAC ) Use and care of required PPE (WAC ) Chemical Hazard Communication Program (WAC ) The Fire Department total Safety Program (WAC ) Safety practices for specific tasks (WAC )

3 References WAC Safety Standard for Firefighters WAC Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens EFD Safety Policy 01 EFD Safety Policy 02 EFD Safety Policy 11 EFD Policy 21 Operation of Vehicles NFPA EMT Patient Care Protocol (current standing orders)

4 Injury Reporting

5 Safety Policy 01 – Injury and Illness Reports for Firefighters You MUST report injuries or illness that result from occupational accidents or occupational exposures Forms are part of Safety Policy 01 Copies are available on the Safety Boards Fatalities or probable fatality report immediately A fact finding investigation may need to be completed.

6 Injury Reporting Safety Whenever an occupational accident causes injury or illness to a member/employee, or whenever a member/employee becomes aware of an illness apparently caused by occupational exposure, it shall be the duty of such member/employee, or someone on his/her behalf, to report the injury or illness to the Fire Chief before the end of his/her duty period, but not more than twenty-four hours after the incident. Safety All members/employees will comply with injury and illness policies and protocols.

7 Accident Reporting

8 Safety Policy 01 – Injury and Illness Reports for Firefighters Accidents involving damage to equipment or property need to be reported. Report accident to supervisor, supervisor to fill out forms. Refer to EFD Policy 21. Forms are part of Safety Policy 01 Copies are available on the Safety Boards An fact finding accident investigation may need to be completed.

9 Reporting of unsafe conditions

10 Non time critical unsafe conditions can be reported using record of hazard observed forms located on safety boards and turned into the appropriate box. Unsafe conditions on emergency scenes should be reported up the chain of command. Other unsafe conditions should be reported to your supervisor or to the Health and Safety Officer.

11 General Safety

12 First Aid Station Locations Station 1 – Near wash station and in maintenance bay Station 2 – Apparatus bay next to Safety Board and in Kitchen Station 3 – Apparatus bay next to Safety Board All Fire Stations have eye wash stations This is required to be part of this training per WAC (3) (a) (i)

13 Emergency Exits and Procedures Classroom exits are to the back and side Exit signage has been removed from the station, excluding sleeping quarters, to be compliant with the IFC. Contact FF Fehr for questions about exit signage. Generally use exit the way you go into a building, be aware of alternate means of egress. This is required to be part of this training per WAC (3) (a) (iv)

14 Emergency Procedures Dial 911 for Fire, Medical and Police Station 1 – Main Electrical Disconnect located on new ATS – Generator automatically starts on power failure – Main Gas Shut off is in Alley – Main Water valve is in Furnace room and/or next to flag pole – Non City PBX phone in Watch Room

15 PPE

16 EFD Safety Policy 11 – Members shall not wear any clothing that is determined to be unsafe due to poor thermal stability or poor flame resistance when engaged in or exposed to the hazards of structural fire fighting.

17 PPE EFD Safety Policy 11 – Because it is impossible to ensure that every member will respond to an incident in a station/work uniform, or will change out of fabrics that have poor thermal stability or ignite easily, before donning protective garment, the Training Officer shall inform members of the hazards of fabrics that melt, drip, burn, stick to the skin and cause burns to the wearer due to poor thermal stability or poor flame resistance.

18 PPE WAC (5) (d) – Members shall not wear any clothing that is determined to be unsafe due to poor thermal stability or poor flame resistance when engaged in or exposed to the hazards of structural fire fighting. Because it’s impossible to ensure that every member will respond to an incident in a station/work uniform or will change out of fabrics that have poor thermal stability or ignite easily, before donning protective garments, the fire department shall inform members of the hazards of fabrics that melt, drip, burn, stick to the skin and cause burns to the wearer due to poor thermal stability or poor flame resistance.

19 PPE NFPA 1500 Standard on Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program 2007 Edition – While on duty, members shall not wear any clothing that is unsafe due to poor thermal stability.

20 PPE Examples clothing with poor thermal stability: – Polyester – Nylon – Some Dept. Issued Uniform Shirts Examples of clothing with good thermal stability: – 100% Cotton – Garments meeting NFPA 1975

21 Use And Care of PPE It is your responsibility to wear proper PPE – Bunker Gear, Boots, Helmet, SCBA, Gloves, Glasses, Goggles, Face shield, N95, Traffic Vests, EMS Gowns It is your responsibility to select proper PPE It is your responsibility to clean your PPE It is your responsibility to decon your PPE

22 EMS PPE Fire fighters shall don emergency medical gloves prior to initiating any emergency patient care. (WAC (2)) Fire fighters shall don emergency medical garments and emergency medical face protection devises prior to any patient care during which splashes of body fluids can occur such as situations involving spurting blood or childbirth. (WAC (3))

23 EMS PPE Contaminated emergency medical garments, emergency medical face protection, gloves, devices, and emergency medical gloves shall be cleaned and disinfected, or disposed of, in accordance with chapter WAC, Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens. (WAC (4))

24 EMS PPE Tuberculosis (TB) exposure and respiratory protection requirements. – (a) Fire fighters shall wear a particulate respirator (PR) when entering areas occupied by individuals with suspected or confirmed TB, when performing high risk procedures on such individuals or when transporting individuals with suspected or confirmed TB in a closed vehicle. – (b) A NIOSH-approved, 95% efficient particulate air respirator is the minimum acceptable level of respiratory protection. (i) Fit tests are required. (ii) Fit tests shall be done in accordance with chapter WAC. WAC (15)

25 EMS PPE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) – Gloves and eye protection should be worn for every patient. FULL PPE for possible infectious contacts – Donning Sequence (MEGG) – Mask* > Eye Protection > Gown > Gloves – Mask patient (if possible) Doffing (removal) Sequence – Gloves > Gown > Hand cleaner – Eye Protection > Mask > Hand cleaner – Handle as contaminated waste – Decon Eye Protection *Fit tested 2007 EMT Patient Care Protocol (current standing orders)

26 EMS PPE INFECTIOUS DISEASE PREVENTION HANDWASHING – Hand washing is the most effective way to prevent transmission of infectious disease. Wash Hands – After patient contact – Before eating, drinking, smoking or handling food – Before & after using the bathroom – After cleaning or checking equipment 2007 EMT Patient Care Protocol (current standing orders)

27 Structural PPE Safety Protective clothing shall be used and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. This requirement applies to personnel’s personally owned protective garments authorized for use. Safety Personal protective clothing shall be of a type specified by NIOSH, MSHA, NFPA, ANSI or as specifically referenced in WAC Safety Each member/employee is responsible for the proper use, care and maintenance of assigned PPE. Safety Inspection intervals and washing of PPE shall not exceed 6 (six) months.

28 Hazard Communication Program

29 Hazard Communication This section will cover the following: What are hazardous chemicals, How do hazardous chemicals affect the body, what are the different types of hazardous chemicals, what is on product labels, what are material safety data sheets How to protect yourself from hazardous chemicals. 1

30 Hazard Communication What is hazard communication? Hazard communication or “hazcom” is our program where we tell you about the hazardous chemicals used in our workplace. We will also train you on how to protect yourself from the effects of these hazardous chemicals. Hazcom training is required by WISHA.

31 Hazard Communication What is a “hazardous chemical”? A hazardous chemical is any chemical that can do harm to your body. Most industrial chemicals can harm you at some level. It depends how much gets into your body.

32 Hazard Communication How do hazardous chemicals affect the body? The effect a certain chemical has on the body depends on several factors: The physical form of the chemical How the chemical enters the body The amount of chemical that actually enters the body - the dose How toxic (poisonous) the chemical is

33 Types of Chemicals The Three Forms of Chemicals All chemicals exists in one of three forms: Solid Liquid Gas

34 Types of Chemicals Solids - Dusts Dust or powder can be released into the air by cutting, drilling, grinding or sanding and inhaled. Dust can also be stirred up by dry sweeping and inhaled.

35 Types of Chemicals Solids – Fumes and Fibers Fumes are extremely small droplets of metal formed when the metal has been vaporized by high temperatures (usually welding) Some compounds are fibers which can be similar to dusts but they have an elongated shape (like asbestos or fiberglass) 7

36 Types of Chemicals Solids - Dust Dust in the air can settle out on work surfaces, cups, plates, utensils, and food. The settled dust can be swallowed with food or drinks.

37 Types of Chemicals Liquids Liquids can come into direct contact with the skin and be absorbed into the body. Liquids can be sprayed and form mists or evaporate and form vapors which can be inhaled.

38 Types of Chemicals Liquids (Mists) Mists can also be inhaled. Mists can settle on the skin and be absorbed. Airborne mists can also settle out and contaminate food or drink. 10

39 Types of Chemicals Gases and Vapors Gases are chemicals that are in the gas phase at room temperature. Vapors evaporate from substances that are liquids or solids at room temperature. Gases and vapors enter the body by inhalation. 11

40 How Chemicals Enter the Body There Are Three Routes of Entry: Ingestion – swallowing the chemical Inhalation – breathing in the chemical Absorption – the chemical soaks through the skin 12

41 How Chemicals Enter the Body Ingestion (Swallowing) Chemicals that are swallowed are absorbed in the digestive tract. Chemicals can rub off dirty hands and contaminate food, drinks or tobacco products. Chemicals in the air can settle on food or drink and be swallowed. 13

42 How Chemicals Enter the Body Inhalation (Breathing) Airborne chemicals are breathed in through the mouth or nose. The size of particles or droplets can affect where the chemical settles in the respiratory tract. Where the chemical settles in the respiratory tract determines what symptoms or diseases will develop. 14

43 How Chemicals Enter the Body Skin Absorption Some chemicals can pass through the skin and be taken into the body’s systems. Solvents and pesticides are examples of compounds that can be absorbed through the skin.

44 Chemical Toxicity Toxicity: how poisonous are chemicals? Dose - The effects of any toxic chemical depends on the amount of a chemical that actually enters the body. Acute Toxicity - the measure of how toxic a chemical is in a single dose over a short period of time. Chronic Toxicity – the measure of the toxicity of exposure to a chemical over a long period of time.

45 Chemical Toxicity Chronic Toxicity and Acute Toxicity Some chemicals will only make you sick if you get an ‘acute” or high dose all at once. Example - ammonia Some chemicals are mainly known for their chronic or long-term effects. Example - asbestos Most chemicals have both acute and chronic effects. Example – carbon monoxide

46 Chemical Toxicity Chemical Exposure Limits Many chemicals have exposure limits, or allowable amounts of a chemical in the air. These limits are often called “PELs” or “TLVs”. They are based on 8-hour average exposure or ceiling or peak levels. Levels must be kept below these limits for safety.

47 Toxic Chemicals Carcinogens Carcinogens are cancer-causing compounds. Some chemicals are known human carcinogens, others are only suspected as carcinogens. WISHA has regulations covering the general use of carcinogens, and has specific regulations for several known human carcinogens.

48 Toxic Chemicals Carcinogens WISHA and OSHA have specific regulations on the following carcinogens: Vinyl Chloride Acrylonitrile 1,2,-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) Inorganic Arsenic Ethylene Oxide Cadmium Butadiene Methylene Chloride Benzene

49 Toxic Chemicals Other Groups of Toxic Chemicals Teratogens Teratogens are compounds that can harm the developing fetus, causing birth defects or death. Mutagens Mutagens cause genetic mutations or changes. These mutations can cause birth defects or other problems in following generations or may lead to cancer in the exposed person.

50 Toxic Chemicals Other Groups of Toxic Chemicals Sensitizers Sensitizers can “switch on” a reaction in an individual worker. The reaction to a sensitizer depends upon the individual worker. Once a worker becomes sensitized to a compound, smaller and smaller exposures can cause a reaction, and the reactions can become more severe.

51 Corrosive Chemicals Acids and bases are common corrosive chemicals. Corrosive chemicals are capable of damaging skin, eyes and the respiratory system.

52 Corrosive Chemicals Corrosive Chemicals - Skin Corrosives can cause visible skin burns or damage. The extent of skin damage depends on how long the corrosive is on the skin and how concentrated the corrosive is.

53 Corrosive Chemicals Corrosive Chemicals – Inhalation and Eyes Inhalation of corrosive mists or vapors can cause severe bronchial irritation. Corrosives are especially damaging to the eyes.

54 Corrosive Chemicals Examples of Corrosive Chemicals Sulfuric Acid Ammonia Chromic acid Phenol Acetic Acid Chlorine Batteries contain sulfuric acid

55 Corrosive Chemicals Protection from Corrosives Protective gloves & clothing Goggles Eyewashes Water (for splashes on the skin)

56 Flammable Liquids Properties of Flammable Liquids The vapor of a flammable liquid ignites and causes fire or explosion – not the liquid itself. The flammability of a liquid depends on its physical properties: Vapor Pressure Flash Point Limits of Flammability Vapor Density

57 Flammable Liquids Vapor Pressure Vapor pressure is a measure of how fast a liquid evaporates. The higher the vapor pressure the more rapidly the liquid will evaporate. Vapor pressure goes up and down with the temperature of the liquid.

58 Flammable Liquids Flash Point The flash point is the lowest temperature that a flammable liquid can generate enough vapor to form a mixture with air that will ignite.

59 Flammable Liquids Limits of Flammability The limits of flammability is the range that a mixture of air and vapor is flammable. Mixtures can be too lean (not enough vapor) or too rich (too much vapor) to ignite and burn.

60 Flammable Liquids Flammable Limits Example LEL – “lower explosive limit” UEL – “upper explosive limit”

61 Flammable Liquids Lower Explosive Limit – LEL In most work situations, the “lower explosive limit” (LEL) is the main concern. Vapors from flammable liquids can be found in the workplace, but are often too diluted to catch fire or explode. However, these vapors can quickly go above the LEL in small room or confined space like a tank.

62 Flammable Liquids Vapor Density “Vapor density” is a measure of how heavy a vapor is compared to air. Vapors with a density greater than 1.0 are heavier than air and can collect near the floor, and “flow” like a liquid. This may create a fire/explosion hazard if the vapor flows to an ignition source.

63 Metals Hazards of Metals Metals can be both physical hazards and health hazards. Some metals can ignite and explode – magnesium, or dusts/filings of other metals such as aluminum Some metals are almost non-toxic – iron, aluminum Others are very toxic – lead, cadmium, mercury, beryllium

64 Our Worksite Information The following operations or work areas is where hazardous chemicals are present: Anytime Products of Combustion are Present Motor Vehicle Indents Decontamination of Equipment Fueling Equipment/Apparatus Cleaning Station/Bathrooms

65 Getting Information How do you get information about hazardous chemicals? You can get information two ways: from the product label, from the product material safety data sheet.

66 Getting Information What is on the product label? The manufacturer, The name of the product, a hazard warning, a list of hazardous ingredients

67 Getting Information What is a material safety data sheet? Material safety data sheets or “MSDSs” are information sheets on products that: tells what chemicals are in the product, what the hazards of the chemicals are, how to protect yourself from the hazards.

68 Material Safety Data Sheet

69 Names of hazardous chemicals in a product, Physical and chemical properties of the product, Physical hazards of working with the product, Health hazards of working with the product (including signs and symptoms of overexposures), MSDSs – what information do they have? Acetone Flammable & highly volatile Burns Headaches, eye irritation

70 Material Safety Data Sheet Material safety data sheets (continued) The main way the chemical enters the body, The legal limit allowed in the air If the chemical is a carcinogen Precautions for safe use of the hazardous chemical, Inhalation 750 ppm No Use with adequate ventilation, keep away from open flame

71 Material Safety Data Sheet Material safety data sheets (continued) Exposure control methods, including personal protective equipment, Emergency and first aid procedures, The date the MSDS was prepared or revised, Name, address and phone number of the person responsible for the information in the MSDS. Wear respirator, rubber gloves Eyes: flush with water for 15 minutes 1996 John Doe 1234 Maple St. Anywhere, USA

72 Our Worksite Information Material Safety Data Sheets are located in the watch Station 1

73 Our Worksite Information We have done air sampling in the following locations: Quarterly Reports for Compressed Breathing Air Results of this air sampling can be found at the following location: Safety Bulletin Boards

74 Container Labeling All chemicals need to be labeled properly if not stored in original container 1 0 0

75 Protecting Yourself You can protect yourself from hazardous chemicals by: Knowing what is in the product your work with, Maintaining machinery and equipment to prevent leaks or releases, Using the smallest amount of a chemical to do the job,

76 Protecting Yourself Protect yourself from hazardous chemicals by: Using ventilation to reduce amounts of chemicals in the air, Wearing necessary personal protective equipment. Enclosing a chemical process as much as possible,

77 Protecting Yourself In the case of a leak or spill, protect yourself by: Informing your supervisor of unusual odors, spills, or releases, Leaving an area of a large spill or chemical release.

78 Protecting Yourself If you have been exposed to a chemical and feel sick: Let your supervisor know, Find out what the chemical was, Follow the first aid directions in the MSDS, Get medical attention as needed, Check your PPE before going back to the area.

79 Fire Department total Safety Program

80 The Fire Department Total Safety Program Includes: – EFD Safety Policies – EFD Policies (AKA SOPs or SOGs) – WACs, CFRs and EMS Protocols – Specific Safety Training – Incorporating Safety in All Training – Risk Management – Individual Safety

81 Specific Task Safety

82 Task Safety Working with fire hose – What is required PPE? Fire Helmet DOT Helmet Eye Protection Bunker Gloves EMS Gloves Steel Toe Boots SCBA Bunker Gear Hearing Protection

83 Task Safety Working with fire hose – What is required PPE? Fire Helmet DOT Helmet Eye Protection Bunker Gloves EMS Gloves Steel Toe Boots SCBA Bunker Gear Hearing Protection

84 Task Safety Interior Team for Structure Fire – What is required PPE? Fire Helmet DOT Helmet Eye Protection Bunker Gloves EMS Gloves Steel Toe Boots SCBA Bunker Gear Hearing Protection

85 Task Safety Interior Team for Structure Fire – What is required PPE? Fire Helmet DOT Helmet Eye Protection (SCBA Mask) Bunker Gloves EMS Gloves Steel Toe Boots (Bunker boots) SCBA (on air) Bunker Gear Hearing Protection

86 Task Safety Pump Operator working as Standby Firefighter – What is required PPE? Fire Helmet DOT Helmet SCBA Mask Bunker Gloves EMS Gloves Steel Toe Boots SCBA Bunker Gear Hearing Protection

87 Task Safety Pump Operator working as Standby Firefighter – What is required PPE? Fire Helmet DOT Helmet SCBA Mask (in Standby mode) Bunker Gloves EMS Gloves Steel Toe Boots (bunker boots) SCBA (Must be donned) Bunker Gear Hearing Protection

88 Task Safety EMS Patient Care – What is required PPE? Fire Helmet DOT Helmet Eye Protection Bunker Gloves EMS Gloves Steel Toe Boots SCBA Bunker Gear Hearing Protection

89 Task Safety EMS Patient Care – What is required PPE? Fire Helmet DOT Helmet Eye Protection (Should be worn per KCEMS) Bunker Gloves EMS Gloves Steel Toe Boots SCBA Bunker Gear Hearing Protection

90 Questions?


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