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Business and Marketing Unit 6: Promotion Chapter 18 Visual Merchandising and Display Mr. Schurig 2 nd Semester.

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Presentation on theme: "Business and Marketing Unit 6: Promotion Chapter 18 Visual Merchandising and Display Mr. Schurig 2 nd Semester."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Business and Marketing Unit 6: Promotion Chapter 18 Visual Merchandising and Display Mr. Schurig 2 nd Semester

3 Transition 18-1 In groups of 2 to 4: Discuss your first impressions when going into a store 1.What catches your eye? 2.List the elements of the displays around the store (color, shape, location, etc.) 3.What do you think is most effective in a display? Marketing-transition 18-1-filastname –Save as: Marketing-transition 18-1-filastname 755

4 18-1: Display Features Students will be able to: Explain the concept and purpose of visual merchandising Identify the elements of visual merchandising Describe types of display arrangements Understand the role of visual merchandisers on the marketing team

5 Visual Merchandising The coordination of all physical elements in a place of business so that it projects the right image to its customers

6 Display The visual and artistic aspects of presenting a product to a target group of customers

7 Elements of Visual Merchandising Storefront Store layout Store interior Interior displays

8 Storefront: The total exterior of a business A sign that is used to display the store’s name Marquee Sign: Designed to attract attention and advertise the business

9 Entrances Window displays Usually designed with customer convenience and security in mind Especially useful for visual merchandising

10 Store layout The way store floor space is allocated to facilitate sales and serve the customer Selling space Merchandise space Personnel space Customer space

11 Store Interior Floor and wall coverings Lighting Colors Store fixtures Fixtures—Store furnishings, such as display cases, counters, shelving, racks, and benches

12 Interior Displays Interior, or in-store displays generate one out of every four sales; they enable customers to make a selection without personal assistance Closed displays Open displays Architectural displays Point-of-purchase displays Store decorations Interactive Kiosks

13 Types of Interior Displays Architectural displays: –Consist of model rooms that allow customers to see how the merchandise might look in their homes

14 Types of Interior Displays Store decorations: –Displays that often coincide with season or holidays. –Banners, signs, props and similar items are used to create the right atmosphere

15 Types of Interior Displays Open displays: –Allow customers to handle and examine merchandise without help of a sales-person.

16 Types of Interior Displays Closed displays –Allow customers to see but not handle merchandise. Typical for jewelry stores or high end sun-glasses, or wherever security might be an issue.

17 Types of Interior Displays Point-of-purchase displays –Displays that are designed to promote impulse purchases. –Usually more effective at supporting new products than established ones

18 Types of Interior Displays Interactive Kiosks: –Recently playing a growing role on P-O-S (Point of Sale) merchandising. –Usually higher- technology displays

19 Class Work 18-1 Textbook: –Page 387, 1 – 4 –Page 395, 9 – 13 Save as: Marketing-CW 18-1-filastname Homework: 1.Visit at least 3 stores in town 2.Evaluate the different window and/or interior displays 3.List the differences and your rating of each of them Save as: Marketing-HW-18-1-filastname

20 Chapter 18, Section 2 Artistic Design

21 Marketing Transition 18-2 With a partner, list the related products you can display with the following: 1. Shampoos 2. Computers 3. Hiking Boots 4. Cell Phones Save as: Marketing Transition 18-2.filastname

22 Marketing Transition 18-2 Shampoo: Brushes and combs Hair styling products Other bath products Computers Printers Software Speakers and headphones Hiking boots: Socks Walking sticks Backpacks Energy snacks Cell phones Covers Car chargers Headphones Other accessories

23 Chapter 18-2 Student Objectives: List the five steps in creating a display Explain how artistic elements function in display design Describe the importance of display maintenance

24 Display design and preparation 1.What is the image of our business? 2.Who are our customers? 3.What kind of merchandise concept is being promoted? 4.Where will the display be built and located? 5.What merchandise will be displayed? 6.How will the selection of merchandise affect the display’s design? How will it affect our business’s image?

25 5 steps to designing and building a display 1.Selecting the merchandise for display. 2.Selecting the type of display. 3.Choosing a setting type. 4.Manipulating the display’s artistic elements. 5.Evaluating the completed display.

26 5 steps to designing and building a display 1. Selecting the merchandise for display. Display merchandise must be visually appealing and appropriate for the season. Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

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28 5 steps to designing and building a display 2.Selecting the display. There are four basic types of display: 1.One item display, showing a single item 2.Similar-product display, showing one kind of item from several different brands 3.Related-merchandise display, grouping items that can be used together 4.Cross-mix merchandise display, featuring mixed merchandise that creates a scene Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

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30 5 steps to designing and building a display 3. Choosing a setting. The setting a business selects will depend largely on the image it wants to project. Settings can be: Realistic Semi-realistic Abstract Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

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32 5 steps to designing and building a display 4. Manipulating artistic elements.  The artistic elements of a display include: Line Color Shape Direction Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2 Texture Proportion Balance Motion Lighting

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36 Manipulating Artistic Elements Various types of lines create different impressions. For example, straight lines suggest stiffness and control while curving lines suggest freedom and movement. Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

37 Manipulating Artistic Elements Display colors should contrast with the surrounding colors to make the display stand out. The standard color wheel illustrates the relationships among colors.

38 Manipulating Artistic Elements  Complementary colors are found opposite each other on the color wheel and are used to create high contrast.

39 Manipulating Artistic Elements  Adjacent colors, also called analogous colors, are located next to each other on the color wheel and share the same undertones. Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

40 Manipulating Artistic Elements Triadic colors involve three colors equally spaced on the color wheel, such as red, yellow, and blue. Triadic color harmony creates vivid and contrasting color schemes. Effective displays use color groupings to create visual calm or excitement. Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

41 Manipulating Artistic Elements Shape refers to the physical appearance, or outline, of a display. Some of the shapes that display units may resemble include: Squares Cubes Circles Triangles Displays that have little or no distinct shape are called mass displays. Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

42 Manipulating Artistic Elements Effective displays have direction, which is a smooth visual flow from one part of the display to another. They should also have a focal point, an area in the display that attracts attention first, above all else. Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

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44 Manipulating Artistic Elements Texture is the look of the surfaces in a display. The contrast between the textures used in a display creates visual interest. Proportion refers to the relationship between and among objects in a display. Props, graphics, and signs should be in proportion to the merchandise; they should not dominate the display. Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

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46 Manipulating Artistic Elements Formal balance in a display happens when items of similar size are grouped together, or they are placed in opposite positions to balance one another out. Informal balance occurs when small items are grouped with a large item. Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

47 Formal Balance

48 Informal Balance

49 Manipulating Artistic Elements Motion is playing an increasingly important role in display design. Animation can be achieved through the use of motorized fixtures, props, and mannequins. Proper lighting is critical to attractive displays. It is recommended that display lighting be two to five times stronger than a store’s general lighting. Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

50 Proper Lighting

51 Creating Motion

52 Display Design and Preparation 5. Evaluating Completed Displays Be sure to ask questions about your displays, such as: 1. Do they enhance the store’s image, appeal to customers, and promote the product in the best possible way? 2. Was a theme creatively applied? 3. Were the color and signage appropriate? 4. Was the result pleasing? Marketing Essentials Chapter 18, Section 18.2

53 Display maintenance 1.Displays should be checked daily for damage or displacement caused by customer handling. 2.Missing merchandise should be replaced immediately. 3.Lights should be checked periodically and replaced as necessary. 4.Display units and props should be cleaned and merchandise dusted on a regular basis.

54 Chapter 18-2 Class Work Textbook: Page 393, 1 – 4 Page 395, 14 – 17 Save as: Marketing-CW 18-2-filastname Workbook: Complete (pg. 153) on your own paper Use the rubric on pg. 154 to guide you Work with a partner (both names on paper)

55 Home Work Reminder Homework: –Visit at least 3 stores in town 1.Observe and evaluate the Storefronts 2.Evaluate the different window and interior displays 3.Review and evaluate the store layout 4.List the differences and your rating of each of them Save as: Marketing-HW-18-1-filastname Due: Tuesday April 12, 2011 May 7, 2015Marketing Chapter 18

56 Chapter 18-2 Class Work Textbook: (Individual Work) Page 393, 1 – 4 Page 395, 14 – 17 Save as: Marketing-CW 18-2-filastname Workbook: Complete (pg. 153) on your own paper Use the rubric on pg. 154 to guide you Work with a partner (both names on paper) Test – Chapters 17 – 18 on Thu. April 14


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