Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chapter Twenty-Seven Quest for Consensus, 1952-1960.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chapter Twenty-Seven Quest for Consensus, 1952-1960."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter Twenty-Seven Quest for Consensus,

2 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.27-2 Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 During the 1950s, government influenced the economy through both military spending and 1. extremely high taxes to pay for the nation’s immense military buildup. 2. continuation of World War II’s wage and price controls to meet the needs of the Cold War. 3. funds for scientific research and technological development. 4. a legal limit to the amount of purchases that the individual consumer could make on credit.

3 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.27-3 Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 During the 1950s, government influenced the economy through both military spending and 2. continuation of World War II’s wage and price controls to meet the needs of the Cold War. Hint: Allocated for scientific and military purposes, such funds also led to the development of many new consumer products. See pages 877–878.

4 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.27-4 Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 As suburbs grew and expanded during the 1950s, 1. the crime rate in them soared because social services could not keep pace with the sudden population influx. 2. inner-city cores deteriorated. 3. they usually went through a period of racial and ethnic violence. 4. new government programs that resembled New Deal ones financed much of the construction.

5 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.27-5 Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 As suburbs grew and expanded during the 1950s, 2. inner-city cores deteriorated. Hint: Deterioration occurred with the departure of so many people from the suburbs. See page 878.

6 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.27-6 Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 “Togetherness,” a term used during the 1950s, 1. characterized the relationship of the idealized modern American husband and wife. 2. was the religious message proclaimed by many of the new television ministries. 3. was the motto coined by the Eisenhower administration to rally the country against the Soviets. 4. was used by critics of American society to denounce the emphasis on conformity.

7 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.27-7 Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 “Togetherness,” a term used during the 1950s, 1. characterized the relationship of the idealized modern American husband and wife. Hint: It described the ideal marriage in which husbands and wives worked as a partnership within the family. See pages 878–879.

8 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.27-8 Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 The Beatnik groups of the 1950s symbolized 1. the extremely poor who were beaten down by recurrent economic downturns. 2. the forgotten poor who had no voice in the political system. 3. rebellion against prevailing American values. 4. the dangers of criticizing government policy because of McCarthyism.

9 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.27-9 Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 The Beatnik groups of the 1950s symbolized 3. rebellion against prevailing American values. Hint: See page 881.

10 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Popular music in the 1950s 1. combined elements of white and black music for the first time. 2. portrayed American values as hopelessly corrupt. 3. repeatedly sounded revolutionary themes. 4. lost out to television entertainment.

11 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Popular music in the 1950s 1. combined elements of white and black music for the first time. Hint: See pages 882–883.

12 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Dwight D. Eisenhower handily won the presidency in 1952 in part because 1. he promised to go to war with China in order to topple communism there. 2. Adlai Stevenson, his opponent, proved to be deeply involved in corrupt business transactions. 3. he was a revered World War II hero. 4. he won the televised debates against his opponent.

13 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Dwight D. Eisenhower handily won the presidency in 1952 in part because 3. he was a revered World War II hero. Hint: See pages 862–864.

14 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Although he believed in less government and fewer New Deal programs, Eisenhower 1. supported spending more federal funds for education. 2. developed a national healthcare system. 3. advocated day care for children at government expense. 4. led the battle for civil rights.

15 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Although he believed in less government and fewer New Deal programs, Eisenhower 1. supported spending more federal funds for education. Hint: He did so in the wake of Soviet space success. See pages 865–866.

16 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Orval Faubus dramatized 1. the damage that the methods of Joseph McCarthy did to innocent individuals. 2. southern resistance to efforts to implement the Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education. 3. the shallowness of suburban life and American materialism. 4. the extent to which communists had actually penetrated high levels of the U.S. government.

17 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Orval Faubus dramatized 2. southern resistance to efforts to implement the Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education. Hint: He used National Guard troops in order to resist integration in Little Rock, Arkansas. See pages 884–885.

18 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Eisenhower’s New Look in Cold War containment policy emphasized 1. a larger land army. 2. a more powerful navy. 3. a smaller air force. 4. more atomic weapons.

19 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Eisenhower’s New Look in Cold War containment policy emphasized 4. more atomic weapons. Hint: It stressed reliance on nuclear weapons. See pages 868–869.

20 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Advocating construction of fallout shelters was one way in which the Eisenhower administration 1. could demonstrate (to the Russians, for example) that it was serious about brinksmanship. 2. accused the Democrats during the 1952 presidential campaign of not adequately preparing the country for war. 3. tried to stimulate the economy during periods of recession. 4. deflected attacks by Joseph McCarthy that it, too, was “soft” on communism.

21 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved Berkin, Making America Chapter 27 Advocating construction of fallout shelters was one way in which the Eisenhower administration 1. could demonstrate (to the Russians, for example) that it was serious about brinksmanship. Hint: It suggested that the administration would go to the brink and engage in nuclear war because the shelters would protect the population. See page 868.


Download ppt "Chapter Twenty-Seven Quest for Consensus, 1952-1960."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google