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Chapter Twenty-Six Truman and Cold War America, 1945-1952.

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1 Chapter Twenty-Six Truman and Cold War America, 1945-1952

2 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-2 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 A dramatic warning that the Russians had hostile designs on the West was given in 1946 by 1. Winston Churchill in his iron curtain speech. 2. Harry Truman in announcing the Truman Doctrine. 3. Whittaker Chambers in his accusations against Alger Hiss. 4. Senator Joseph McCarthy in his speech in Wheeling, West Virginia.

3 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-3 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 A dramatic warning that the Russians had hostile designs on the West was given in 1946 by 1. Winston Churchill in his iron curtain speech. Hint: The power of the iron-curtain metaphor made a profound impression. See page 833.

4 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-4 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 Unlike U.S. foreign policy after World War I, the United States after World War II 1. joined the new postwar international organization. 2. attempted to retreat into isolationism. 3. insisted on being awarded new overseas colonies. 4. re-enacted the former neutrality laws.

5 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-5 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 Unlike U.S. foreign policy after World War I, the United States after World War II 1. joined the new postwar international organization. Hint: The United States was a founding member of the United Nations after World War II. See pages 831–832.

6 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-6 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 Through the foreign policy known as containment, the United States intended to 1. coordinate development of the worlds oil resources. 2. prevent the Soviets from seizing Manchuria from China. 3. confront all attempts by the Soviet Union to expand its power. 4. contain the development of atomic-bomb capabilities by other nations.

7 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-7 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 Through the foreign policy known as containment, the United States intended to 3. confront all attempts by the Soviet Union to expand its power. Hint: The idea was to contain the Soviets by confronting them any time they tried to expand their power and influence. See pages 832–833.

8 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-8 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 The Truman Doctrine arose in direct response to 1. the Soviet-engineered coup in Czechoslovakia. 2. the communist seizure of China. 3. possible Soviet designs on Iran. 4. the possibility that Greece would fall to communist insurgents.

9 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-9 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 The Truman Doctrine arose in direct response to 4. the possibility that Greece would fall to communist insurgents. Hint: In addition to the strong possibility of a communist victory in Greece, the Soviet Union wanted Turkey to share control over the strategic Dardanelles. See pages 834–835.

10 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-10 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 In June 1947, Secretary of State George C. Marshall announced his plan to 1. liberate Poland from Soviet control. 2. strengthen the American nuclear arsenal. 3. provide funds for the economic reconstruction of Europe. 4. confront the Soviets military in Berlin.

11 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-11 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 In June 1947, Secretary of State George C. Marshall announced his plan to 3. provide funds for the economic reconstruction of Europe. Hint: The Marshall Plans purpose was to restore prosperity, thereby reducing the appeal of the Communist and Socialist Parties in Europe. See page 835.

12 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-12 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 Because of the impending creation of a unified West Germany, the Soviet Union 1. offered to withdraw its troops from most of Eastern Europe. 2. withdrew from the United Nations for a period of two years. 3. blockaded the city of Berlin. 4. threatened to use atomic bombs against England and France.

13 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-13 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 Because of the impending creation of a unified West Germany, the Soviet Union 3. blockaded the city of Berlin. Hint: The Soviets isolated Berlin by prohibiting all overland travel to it. See pages 836–837.

14 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-14 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 A critic of Trumans Cold War policies in 1950 could cite all of the following as losses to the communists EXCEPT 1. China. 2. Czechoslovakia. 3. Poland. 4. Turkey.

15 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-15 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 A critic of Trumans Cold War policies in 1950 could cite all of the following as losses to the communists EXCEPT 4. Turkey. Hint: With support provided by the United States, Turkey successfully withstood Soviet pressure. See pages 834–835.

16 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-16 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 Close to defeat, North Korea successfully counterattacked against the forces of the United Nations 1. when reassured that Russia would use the atomic bomb to prevent a North Korean defeat. 2. when China suddenly entered the war. 3. because the United States, thinking the war was almost over, had withdrawn most of its troops from Korea. 4. after President Truman fired General MacArthur.

17 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-17 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 Close to defeat, North Korea successfully counterattacked against the forces of the United Nations 2. when China suddenly entered the war. Hint: A massive Chinese attack against United Nations forces in North Korea turned the tide in favor of North Korea. See page 840.

18 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-18 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 A development after World War II that may have helped to prevent a resumption of the Great Depression was 1. slow and restrained demobilization of the armed forces. 2. the revival of New Deal employment and relief programs. 3. a great home-building boom to make up for scarce housing. 4. a large tax increase that slowed down inflation.

19 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-19 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 A development after World War II that may have helped to prevent a resumption of the Great Depression was 3. a great home-building boom to make up for scarce housing. Hint: To meet a great housing shortage, a building boom mushroomed. See pages 840–850.

20 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-20 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 Pollsters regarded President Truman as vulnerable in the presidential election of 1948 for all the following reasons EXCEPT 1. His party was split into several factions. 2. He had lost the support of black voters. 3. His civil rights policy was unpopular in the South. 4. He was too liberal.

21 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.26-21 Berkin, Making America Chapter 26 Pollsters regarded President Truman as vulnerable in the presidential election of 1948 for all the following reasons EXCEPT 2. He had lost the support of black voters. Hint: Because this statement is not true, it is the correct choice. African Americans supported the Democratic Party, which had adopted a civil rights plank. Truman had also ordered the military to integrate. See pages 844–845.


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