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. September, 2005 Lucille Eber Ed.D A 2-Day Training for Schools Implementing School-wide PBIS Intensive Level PBIS: Integrating Wraparound Approaches.

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Presentation on theme: ". September, 2005 Lucille Eber Ed.D A 2-Day Training for Schools Implementing School-wide PBIS Intensive Level PBIS: Integrating Wraparound Approaches."— Presentation transcript:

1 . September, 2005 Lucille Eber Ed.D A 2-Day Training for Schools Implementing School-wide PBIS Intensive Level PBIS: Integrating Wraparound Approaches in PBIS Schools Developing, Implementing & Evaluating Individualized Teams and Plans for Students with Comprehensive Needs & Their Families

2 Overall Goals Training: 1.Understand a) key features of wraparound value base and process; b) wraparound as a component of a school-wide system of positive behavior support for all youth; and c) procedures for designing for individualized team and interventions for 1-5% of students and their families. 2. Gain experience with components of the wraparound process: a) engaging key players, b) team design c) strength and needs driven, and d) interventions/outcomes based. 3. Learn to apply data-based decision-making, self-assessment and monitoring procedures to ensure effectiveness of practices.

3 Wraparound as a Component of a School-wide Positive Behavior Support System  Proactive?  Strength-based?  Team-based?  Family centered?  Voice, ownership?  Natural supports? Are elements of wraparound consistent with approaches used in schools for all kids?

4 Academic Systems Behavioral Systems 1-5% 5-10% 80-90% Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based High Intensity Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based Intense, durable procedures Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Targeted Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Individual or Group Universal Interventions All students Preventive, proactive Universal Interventions All settings, all students Preventive, proactive Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success

5 Positive Behavior Support Universal School-Wide Assessment School-Wide Prevention Systems Targeted Intensive Analyze Student Data Interviews, Questionnaires, etc. Observations and ABC Analysis Multi-Disciplinary Assessment & Analysis Small group interventions Simple Student Interventions Complex Student Interventions Group Interventions Complex Individualized Interventions Team-Based Wraparound Interventions Intervention Assessment T. Scott, 2004

6 N=223 N=169 N=38 N=17 N=169 N=223 N=17 N=38 t = 11.11 (335) p<.0001t = 2.30 (27) p <.03

7 IL 2003-04 data

8 IL PBIS Schools at Phase II or Higher SET Criterion Comparisons July 2005

9 “Requires real talent and skills” (Rob Horner) Applies Art (of engagement) and Science (of interventions) Needs to happen sooner for many students/families Gets tougher with each system failure Requires thinking differently with kids and families Is easier in schools proficient with school-wide PBIS Includes system/practice/data components L. Eber 2005 What Do we Know about the Tertiary Level:

10 Individualized Comprehensive Teams/Plans What? The development of a very unique, individualized, strength-based team & plan with the youth and family that is designed to improve quality of life as defined by the youth/family. Who? Youth with multiple needs across home, school, community Youth with multiple life domain needs The adults in youth’s life are not effectively engaged in comprehensive planning (i.e. adults not getting along very well)

11 Individualized, Comprehensive Teams/Plans What Do Intensive Plans include? Supports and interventions across multiple life domains and settings (i.e. behavior support plans, academic interventions, basic living supports, multi-agency strategies, family supports, community supports, etc.) What’s Different? Natural supports and unique strengths are emphasized in team and plan development. Youth/family access, voice, ownership are critical features. Plans include supports for adults/family as well as youth.

12  Facilitate/guide a wraparound team planning process  Family/student/teacher ownership of plan  Access full range of school and community support services across life domains  Home, school, community settings  Individualized academic and behavior interventions are integrated into wrap plans Intensive Intervention

13 What Happens during the Wraparound process? The wraparound process creates a context for design & implementation of research- based behavioral, academic and clinical interventions

14 Unique Fit Wraparound plans should be uniquely designed to fit individual students needs as opposed to making a student fit into a prescribed program.

15 Integrating wraparound and PBIS  Establishing a school-wide system of positive behavior supports can establish environments in schools that help personnel feel more confident about wraparound approaches with students with significant needs.

16 What is Wraparound?  Wraparound is a tool used to implement interagency systems of care in achieving better outcomes for youth and their families.  Wraparound is an important component of school-wide systems of positive behavior supports (PBS)

17 What is Wraparound? (cont)  Wraparound is a process for developing family-centered teams and plans that are strength and needs based (not deficit based) across multiple settings and life domains.  Wraparound plans include natural supports, are culturally relevant, practical and realistic.

18 What is Wraparound? (cont’d)  Blending perspectives of team members results in a variety of traditional and nontraditional strategies that are directly linked to agreed upon outcomes.  The wraparound process creates a context for effective implementation of research-based behavioral, academic and clinical interventions

19 Blending perspectives of team members results in a variety of traditional and nontraditional strategies that are directly linked to agreed upon outcomes. What happens during the wraparound process?

20 Life Domains Family, Medical/Health Recreational Spiritual Cultural Education/Vocational Legal Relationships Other Social/Fun Safety Emotional/behavioral Basic Needs School,Community

21  used with individual students  plans reflect voice, priorities of youth and family  based on unique youth and family needs  culturally relevant teams and plans  built upon youth, family and provider strengths  uses traditional and non-traditional interventions  encompasses multiple life domains  resources are blended; must be flexible  services are planned, implemented, and evaluated by a team  team supports youth, family and providers  unconditional - if the plan doesn’t work, change the plan Wraparound:

22 SYSTEMS PRACTICES DATA Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Decision Making Supporting Student Behavior OUTCOMES Social Competence & Academic Achievement

23 The team decided to develop a school-wide cool tool to teach/shape “respectful interactions with adults” because:  concerns about being able to deliver consistent practice, prompts and reinforcers across all settings at school.  concerns that Simon would not be accepting of an individualized approach to teaching the desired behavior  the principal stated that Simon wasn’t the only student who needed teaching/practice of this behavior How did a school-wide cool tool emerge from a Wraparound planning process for an individual student?

24 Value Base Build on strengths to meet needs One family-one plan Community-based responsiveness Increased parent choice Increased family independence Care for children in context of families Care for families in context of community Never give up P.Miles, 2004

25 Establish Family Voice/Ownership  No blaming, no shaming  Start with strengths  They choose their own team  Focus on what they identify as needs  Listen to their story before the meeting  Validate their perspective  Communicate differently…..

26 No Blame. No Shame. Means you are not allowed to have an opinion while hearing someone’s story (unless there is an imminent safety issue). -Pat Miles-

27 How Do we Know if the Team is Truly Family-centered? Does the family ( including the youth ) feel like it is their meeting and their plan instead of feeling like they are attending a meeting the school or agency is having about them.

28 Points to Remember about Engaging Families …  Remember that the professionals don’t get to choose or judge how families raise their kids.  Always start with a conversation ( not a meeting) with the family, getting their trust and permission before talking with others.

29 A Definition of Unconditional Care  Students don’t fail “plans fail”.  When the plan fails, don’t blame the youth/family.  Instead, change the plan.

30 Compare & Contrast Break into smaller discussion groups. List the similarities and differences between what you’re doing now and Wraparound as it has just been defined.

31 Using the Wraparound Process  Preparing for wraparound meetings through individual conversations with core team members is a critical first step.  The first contact with the family should feel different than being invited to a meeting.  A rich strength profile is a valuable tool for action planning.

32 Examples of Guiding Questions to Assist in Initial Conversations  What has worked or hasn’t worked and why do you think it has worked or not?  What challenges or barriers have you encountered as you have attempted specific strategies?  What is your hope, dream, vision of success with your (this) child/family?

33 Can wraparound teams use data- based decision-making to prioritize needs, design strategies, & monitor progress of the child/family team? Big Question ? more efficient teams, meetings, and plans? less reactive (emotion-based) actions? more strategic actions? more effective outcomes? longer-term commitment to maintain success?

34 Four Phases of Wraparound Implementation Team Preparation –Get people ready to be a team –Complete strengths/needs chats (baseline data) Initial Plan Development –Hold initial planning meetings (integrate data) –Develop a team “culture” (use data to establish voice) Plan Implementation & Refinement –Hold team meetings to review plans (ongoing data collection and use) –Modify, adapt & adjust team plan (based on data) Plan Completion & Transition –Define good enough ( Data-based decision-making) –“Unwrap”

35 Blending Data Sources: 1.Listening/probing during conversations/chats: Translating their stories 2.Data Tools Documenting key areas of strengths/needs

36 The Data Tools: 1.Wraparound Integrity Tool (WIT) 2.Referral/Disposition Tool (RD-T) 3.Home/School/Community Tool (HSC-T) 4.Education Information Tool (EI-T) 5.Big Behavior Tool (BB-T) 6.Youth Satisfaction Tool (YS-T) 7.Family Satisfaction Tool (FS-T) 8.ISBE Parent Survey (upon discharge?)

37 First Phase of Wraparound: Team Development Facilitator –Meets with family & stakeholders –Gathers perspectives on strengths & needs –Assess for safety & rest –Provides or arranges stabilization response if safety is compromised –Explains the wraparound process –Identifies, invites & orients Child & Family Team members –Completes strengths summaries & inventories –Arranges initial wraparound planning meeting

38 First Phase of Wraparound: Team Development Completed Products –A strength summary detailing the family’s story –A strength inventory listing of family strengths –List of potential team members –Initial needs list –Referral-Disposition Tool –Educational Information Tool –Home/School/Community Tool –Big Behavior Tool Details –Signed Releases to speak with potential team members –Roster of team members names, numbers & addresses –Individualized arrangements to assure maximum team participation in meeting

39 First Phase of Wraparound: Team Development Benefits & Enhancements Defines the starting point Creates a common reality for all team members Sets foundation for future measurement Creates capacity to gather a range of responses What are yours? Challenges & Questions Integrating data tools into basic wraparound patterns What if responses are vastly different? Avoiding the “paper-driven” trap How to share your information as you move to Phase II Balancing family driven & directive interviewing Introducing Wraparound Evaluation Tool What are yours?

40 Second Phase of Wraparound: Plan Development Facilitator: Holds an initial (or 2) wraparound plan development meeting Introduces process & team members Presents strengths & distributes strength summary Solicits additional strength information from gathered group Leads team in creating a mission Introduces needs statements & solicits additional perspectives on needs from team Creates a way for team to prioritize needs Leads the team in generating brainstormed methods to meet needs Solicits or assigns volunteers Documents & distributes the plan to team members

41 Second Phase of Wraparound: Initial Plan Development Completed Products –A written plan of care that Details the Mission Statement Needs selected for action Interventions/actions including who will do what when & what strengths are being built on A written crisis response plan detailing anticipated event & response as well as a notification plan –Family-Caregiver Satisfaction Tool –Youth Satisfaction Tool –Wraparound IntegrityTool –All previously introduced Tools Details –Distribution of Plan of Care to all team members –A schedule for ongoing meetings

42 Second Phase of Wraparound: Initial Plan Development Benefits & Enhancements Gathers child & family input from a variety of sources Rates your practice across operational values Ties to results rather than just process What are yours? Challenges & Questions Timing, timing, timing Balancing parent/caregiver & youth satisfaction is tricky Age of child respondent Summarizing relevant data for this team, how do you choose? Introducing a structured decision making process in passionate circumstances What are yours?

43 Third Phase of Wraparound: Plan Implementation & Refinement Facilitator –Sponsors & holds regular team meetings –Solicits team feedback on accomplishments & documents –Leads team members in assessing & analyzing the plan For Follow Through For Impact –Creates an opportunity for modification Adjust services or interventions currently provided Stop services or interventions currently provided Maintains services or interventions currently provided –Solicits volunteers to make changes in current plan array –Documents & distributes team meeting minutes

44 Third Phase of Wraparound: Plan Implementation & Refinement Completed Products –Ongoing meeting minutes that detail changes in the Plan of Care –Quarterly reports that detail progress toward meeting needs/achieving outcomes (the graphs) –Ongoing record of team member participation detailing who has attended & who has not –All Tools Details –Method for communication for team members –Process for orienting new team members as circumstances change

45 Third Phase of Wraparound: Plan Implementation & Refinement Benefits & Enhancements Gets the facts in front of the team Allows for reasoned modification, takes the personal out of it What are yours? Challenges & Questions Integrating data summaries with other inputs Strategically choosing best summaries Following a disciplined decision making process Relating the data to the intervention rather than just the location What are yours?

46 Fourth Phase of Wraparound: Plan Completion & Transition Facilitator –Holds meetings Solicits all team members sense of progress Charts sense of met need Has team discuss what life would like after Wraparound –Reviews underlying context/conditions that brought family to the system in the first place to determine if situation has changed –Identifies who else can be involved –Facilitates approach of “post-system” wraparound resource people –Creates or assigns rehearsals or drills with a “what if” approach –Formalizes structured follow-up if needed –Creates a commencement ritual appropriate to family & team

47 Fourth Phase of Wraparound: Plan Completion & Transition Completed Products Written Transition Plan that details how to access ongoing services/supports if necessary Written crisis plan that details who & how to contact individuals Follow up phone numbers for team members Formal Discharge Plan detailing strengths & interventions that were successful & those that weren’t All Tools Details Written letters of introduction for anticipated next formal service access

48 Steps for Developing a Wraparound Plan Step 1: Initial Conversations (story) Step 2: Clarify Agenda, logistics, & team rules Step 3: Introduce by Roles and Goals Step 4: Develop/Review a Mission Statement Step 5: Start Meeting w/Strengths; Celebrate Successes Step 6: Identify Needs across Domains Step 7: Prioritize Needs Step 8: Develop Actions Step 9: Assign Tasks/Solicit Commitments/ Set Next Meeting Date Document, Evaluate, Revise…..

49 Team Design and Team Development: Identifying Roles of Team members Life Domain Profile: Strengths, Needs Interventions

50 Teams & Wraparound Practice Patterns: How it Happens in Wraparound Three types of team members  Natural: connected to family by relationship  Informal: Connected by citizenship  System: Paid to care Potential team members are generated through initial conversations prior to first meeting Families are encouraged to invite their supports to help “us” stay on track Agree to change the conversation to accommodate participation Identify who will invite who Orient team members prior to first meeting

51 Examples of Natural Support People who have been on teams Colleagues Friends Extended Family Neighbors Coaches Clergy Bus Drivers Babysitters School Custodian Crossing Guard Classmates

52 Examples of Natural Supports Found on Wraparound Teams Co-workers Relatives: extended family Friends Classmates Clergy Storeowners/merchants Postal Workers Crossing Guards Taxi Drivers Neighbors Coaches School custodians Bartenders Previous “helpers” P.Miles, 2004

53 How are wrap teams different? Roles are the focus (not job titles) Natural supports Focus on strengths Family voice and ownership Focus on needs (instead of services)

54 Examples of Roles a Teacher could Provide:  Academic Coach  Behavioral Coach  Friend  Crisis support  Respite provide  Translator

55 Who is currently on team? (activity) What role does each person feel they play with this student/family?

56 Strengths & Wraparound Practice Patterns: How it Happens in Wraparound Occurs with a named facilitator & family member/person “Chat” format rather than assessment Other perspectives on strengths are solicited Requires looking as well as listening Lists are generated prior to first meeting Each family strengths Family as a whole Starts with descriptive moves to contextual moves to functional Presented at first team meeting & added to rather than completely generated at first meeting

57 Listening for Strengths Traits & Talents –Who is the child/family & what are their characteristics? Skills and Abilities –What can the child/family do? Attributes and History –Who was involved, and what did they contribute? Preferences –What else would feel real and valid for this child/family?

58 How are strengths used continuously in the wraparound process? To engage team members To establish ownership of team and plan To ensure ownership in interventions To ensure interventions are proactive To continuously build on successes

59 Strength Products The Strength Summary –Is distributed to each team member and is –A written narrative that –Tells a Story of the entire family –Identifies strengths, talents, capacities & gifts –While relating the facts from a positive framework. The Strength Inventory A list of traits, talents, skills & attributes That are summarized in hand-outs & visuals That provides a quick listing of The family’s capacities, potentials, gifts & accomplishments and Is reviewed together as a team.

60 Strengths & Wraparound Best Practice Targets Services & interventions are created based on strengths No service is used without a corresponding strength More is documented about strengths than problems Strengths of each family member and the family as a whole are recorded Families are introduced & referred based on strengths

61 Can teams use data to prioritize needs, design strategies, & monitor progress of the child/family team? Data-based Decision-making more efficient teams, meetings, and plans? less reactive (emotion-based) actions? more strategic actions? more effective outcomes? longer-term commitment to maintain success?

62 Wraparound Case Study “Diego” Reason for Wrap Referral 6 th grader Academic Difficulties Behavioral Difficulties Impaired Relationships Family Support Needs Social Skills Needs

63 Wraparound Case Study “Diego” Getting to Strengths via Chats & Data Strengths Responsible caretaker for younger siblings Likes Math Enjoys watching National Geographic channel Works well 1:1 with adults when he feels respected Likes physical activity, especially boxing

64 Wraparound Case Study “Ozzie” cont. Getting to Strengths and Needs at Baseline Using Data and Voice & Choice

65 Specific/Functional Multiple settings Multiple life domains Hidden Strengths Family strengths Strength profile activity:

66 “Diego” Getting to Needs via chats and data Control Anger Pass classes Independent Work Completion Healthy eating habits Improve reading skills

67 Wraparound Case Study “Ozzie” Getting to Strengths and Needs at Baseline Using the data to blend perspectives

68 Wraparound Case Study “Diego” cont. Getting to Strengths and Needs throughout the process Responds like other youth to emotional situations Knows how to ask for help Knows when to ask for help

69 “Roman” Using the Data to get to Strengths and Needs Home School

70 An Example Of: Different Perspectives ?  Jim’s family member stated that lack of reading skills and transition to high school are their biggest concerns.  They are also opposed to the use of repeated suspensions and detentions.  Jim’s school state that his acting-out behavior is their biggest concern.

71 An Example Of: Different Perspectives What is the need ? (cont’d)  The school also expressed a concern about their perceived lack of support from the family for behavior consequences imposed at school.  The student stated that he would “rather get in trouble than look stupid in front of his friends”.

72 Needs & Wraparound Assumptions & Values  Difficult behaviors result from unmet needs  Difficult behaviors tell us important things about a person’s life  Common “misses” for families Meaningful relationships Sense of safety & well being Power & Control Joy Relevant skills & knowledge A sense of value & self worth  Needs are not services  Allow family to voice their needs rather than assessing needs for them  Needs extend beyond “service” boundaries P.Miles, 2004

73 What does this youth need to function more like a typical youth who is doing OK in our school and community? A Good Question To Ask

74 The Steps of the Wraparound Process  Before action planning, the team must first reach consensus on priority needs  Actions must be agreed to, clearly documented and monitored by the team.

75 Services & Needs are Different Need  Defines why do the action  Unifying concept that cuts across all three levels of service  Changes infrequently until reports indicate “met need” Service  Defines the action  Three levels Existing service Intervention Support  Frequent changes based on new information P.Miles, 2004

76 Goals and Needs are Different Need  Is something I can imagine the person saying if they could “I need help getting a life to be sober for”  Will address compelling reason for the person “I need to do this so I can get that”  Addresses needing “from” more of a compelling purpose Goal  Is something I can imagine for someone else “You need to get into treatment”  May address system or adult mandates “You need to do this”  Addresses needing “to” More of a command P.Miles, 2004

77 “Needs” Talk in Team Meetings When a team member disguises a service as a need, i.e. –He needs a special education placement or –The family needs counseling Ask the team member –What do you hope will be accomplished through this? –Why do you think this is important to the person? –How will you know when it’s been effective?

78 Needs & Individualized Service Planning Focus on the “why” of a need not the “how” of it –Needs to be reassured to know that others see him as okay even when he makes mistakes on homework rather than he needs to complete his homework Use descriptive terms –To learn, To know, To experience, To feel, To see, To have, To be Deal with the “big” stuff –Families deserve to know their teams are dealing with their larger challenges More than one way to Meet it P.Miles, 2004

79 Needs & Wraparound Practice Patterns: How it Happens in Wraparound Named facilitator looks for needs as they complete the strengths “chats” Needs statements brought together as a team Family confirms accuracy or not Prioritized as most important together Focus on the “why” of a need not the “how” of it > Needs to be able to support kids rather than needs a car to get to work Needs are not services > Not “she needs treatment” but “she needs to know she can still have fun while sober” Needs are not goals > Not “she needs to attend school” but “she needs to be convinced she can learn in school” P.Miles, 2004

80 Needs & Wraparound Best Practice Targets Needs are documented in a plan of care Needs range across life domain areas Needs are “spoken” & approved by the family Needs are prioritized to no more than five Team measures family experience of “met need” rather than service provided Interventions to meet needs are documented rather than slots for referral P.Miles, 2004

81 Examples of Needs Statements:  The student needs to know how to keep friends.  The student needs to learn how to express his anger without hurting others.  The parent needs to know her son is getting a fair shake at school.  The student needs to be reassured that he can complete the work. The student needs to feel adults and peers respect him.

82 Using the Wraparound Process  Propose draft needs statement with the family before the meeting.  Draw team members in during the meetings with questions and requests to share their story or perspective.

83 Needs based interventions will: Change the environment around the situation rather than waiting for the person with the unmet need to do the changing Help build skills for the child and the child’s supporters (family, teachers, neighbors, kin, etc.) Access existing resources when there is fit, avoid existing resources when there is not

84 Exploring Unmet Needs as the Basis for Behavior 1.Describe the Behavior 2. What Happened Next?3. Why would anyone need to act that way? 4. Unmet Need P.Miles, 2004

85 A Quick Test Review Your needs statements –Are needs statements clearly articulated? (Clarity) –Can you tell who has what need? (Individualized) –Is the need stated in such a way that it will take time to work on it? (Enduring) –Is there more than one way to meet the need? (Needs vs. Service) P.Miles, 2004

86 Compare & Contrast: Defining Need Break into smaller discussion groups. Have someone volunteer to discuss a situation with a family. As the person is discussing the situation with the family, the group should brainstorm underlying needs statements. Try to brainstorm at least ten potential needs statements using the strategies defined in this section.

87 The person who is supposed to implement the strategy needs to be actively involved in designing it; or it probably won’t work ! Ownership & Voice: A Key to Intervention Design Interventions….

88 Functional Assessment Pathway Setting Event Triggering Event or Antecedent Problem Behavior Maintaining Consequence THE FUNCTION “Get something” “Get away from Something”

89 Examples of Behavioral Pathways Jason screams and hits his head when approached by his peers Marge or Allison. When he screams, Allison and Marge move away and leave Jason alone. This is more likely to happen if Jason is tired. Setting Event Trigger Behavior Consequence Tired Approached Scream Avoid Marge by Marge hits head & Allison’s or Allison teasing

90 Examples of Behavioral Pathways Marla steals objects and hides them in her desk/backpack. There is always a “big scene” when the objects are discovered. The problem is most likely during independent/seat work. Setting Event Trigger Behavior Consequence teacher working stealing teacher occupied alone objects attention

91 Steps for Success  Make sure the people who the plan effects the most have the most ownership over it.  The process itself should feel supportive to the child, family, and teacher.  Recognize that your system or program may already have some of the features in place. Build on these as you initiate others.

92 Points To Keep in Mind When Action Planning with a Team  Data collection strategies may need to be designed by teams.

93 Points To Keep in Mind When Action Planning with a Team..  Scientifically sound strategies can fail if they don’t fit with values and skills of those who are supposed to implement them.

94 Mapping a Route to Effectiveness (cont’d)  Effective wraparound plans go beyond crisis/safety needs and include strategies for skill development of youth, family or other core team members.  Effective wraparound plans may include strategies to support the adults (families, teachers) as well as the youth.

95 Effective plans clearly describe what the positive change will look like as well as specify who will do what to ensure that the desired change is likely to be achieved.

96 Activities for building strengths may not necessarily be contingent on a behavior change but may be explicitly for the purpose of creating success experiences.

97 Effective teams know when they do not yet have enough information to design an effective strategy

98 Effective Behavior Interventions:  Function – based  Proactive  Have adequate dosage of: Instruction Practice Support Encouragement Monitoring

99 The task is not redesign the individual but to redesign the environment in order to prevent problem behavior and ensure an acceptable behavior is produced instead- Rob Horner

100 The purpose of doing a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) is to guide the design of an effective intervention. Therefore an FBA is not complete until an effective strategy is in place

101 Points To Keep in Mind When Action Planning with a Team  Designing interventions without assessing the “why” of the problem can result in making the problem worse instead of better.  An FBA is not complete until an effective strategy is in place

102 Points To Keep in Mind When Action Planning with a Team…  Scientifically sound strategies can fail if they don’t fit with values and skills of those who are supposed to implement them.  Anticipating crisis events that may occur and designing response is essential for long term success.

103 Compare & Contrast: Practicing Individualized Responses Break into the same group you were in for the discussion about need. Choose one need statement. As a group brainstorm at least ten imaginative ways to meet that need. Each method has to build on community or family strengths and cannot be an existing service. When you have finished trade Needs Statements, only, with another group. That group should brainstorm ten strength based imaginative responses to your needs statements. Compare your lists. What have you learned? P.Miles, 2004

104 Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” Reason for Referral (baseline) for Comprehensive Wraparound Plan (Nov. 03) Behavior Difficulties (home,school, community) Academic difficulties Emotional needs (h/s/c) Social skills needs (h/s/c)

105 Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Reason for Referral cont. Impaired family relationships Impaired peer relationships Family support needs Mental health needs (depression)

106 Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Student Baseline Information Repeated seventh grade General ed classroom 100% of day Failing academics (GPA 0 – 59%) 6 or more detentions 2 – 5 in-school suspensions

107 Question: To what extent have members on your team...treated you with respect? Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Using Data to get Voice & Choice

108 Question: To what extent have members on your team...involved you in activities and programs that were beneficial? Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Using Data to get Voice & Choice

109 Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Classroom Functioning From three points in time (11/03 – 06/04)

110 Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Strengths Sustained at Six Months (11/03 – 06/04)

111 Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Strength Sustained at Six Months (11/03 – 06/04) Works independently

112 Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Need Becomes Strength at Six Months (11/03 – 06/04) Has enough to do (age-appropriate activities)

113 Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Ongoing Needs/Six Months (11/03 – 06/04)

114 Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Strengths Gained 2 nd Year (11/03 – 02/05)

115 Wraparound Case Study “Carlos” cont. Using Data to get to Interventions Emotional Functioning

116 Facilitating Wraparound  Effective wraparound facilitators guide the team process rather then do everything for the youth and family.  Wraparound facilitators need to be able to identify successes and challenges of guiding the team process.

117 Some Things the Educational Staff Might Find Different When Using the Wraparound Planning Process Initial Engagement of family entails finding out the good news… –No matter how loud the other news is Family takes a key decision making role at the table… –If the family isn’t present, you have to go back & engage again Interventions are integrated across home, school & community… –May entail partnerships with others including family members, community resources, unexpected school representatives Interventions are designed to be changed –Can stop doing things that aren’t working, start doing things that might and keep doing things that do Team membership may include surprising representatives… –Might include school support staff (custodians, front desk secretaries, previous teachers), family members (uncles, cousins, aunts) and other family folks (friends, neighbors, co-workers) along with traditional school representatives P.Miles, 2004

118 Plans & Wraparound Practice Patterns – A Plan is developed with the whole team present –A named facilitator is responsible for documenting the plan & distributing it to the whole team –The Plan identifies the direction the team is going as well as summarizing what’s been tried –A mission statement in the family’s voice is documented on each page (letterhead) –All strengths are recorded in the plan & specific strengths are tied to interventions –Needs are prioritized & those needs become the spine of the plan –Actions are reviewed regularly & modified frequently P.Miles, 2004

119 Evaluating Wraparound Plans Will the proposed option: Build on existing or added strengths? Increase safety of youth, family and community? Multiply positive relationships? Enhance youth/family capabilities? Reduce youth/family vulnerabilities? Increase youth/family autonomy? Address external requirements? Lead to youth and family goals? P. Miles, 2004

120 FEW Cohort Study Classroom Behaviors and Academic Achievement Always80% & above 70-79% Behavior Academics Frequently 60-69% Sometimes 59% & below Never

121 FEW Cohort Study Need for more Academic and Behavioral Intervention in the Classroom Yes No

122 FEW Cohort Study Need for more Academic and Behavioral Intervention in the Classroom SPED 21-60% of Day General Ed 100% of Day General ED with Inclusion Supports

123 FEW Cohort Study Youth and Family Checklist: Health & Safety Functioning Domain High Strength Low Strength Low Need High Need School : Base –Time 3 p<.05 Home: Base –Time 3 p<.015

124 FEW Cohort Study Youth and Family Checklist: Social Functioning Domain High Strength Low Strength Low Need High Need School : Base –Time 3 p<.000 Home: Base –Time 3 p<.004

125 FEW Cohort Study Youth and Family Checklist: Emotional Functioning Domain High Strength Low Strength Low Need High Need School : Base –Time 3 p<.008 Home: Base –Time 2 p<.009 School : Base –Time 3 p<.000 Home: Base –Time 3 p<.000

126 FEW Cohort Study Youth and Family Checklist: Behavioral Functioning Domain High Strength Low Strength Low Need High Need School : Base –Time 2 p<.009 Home: Base –Time 2 p<.008 School: Base –Time 3 p<.000 Home: Base –Time 3 p<.000

127 FEW Cohort Study Youth and Family Checklist: Presence of Big Behaviors: Verbal Abuse, Lying, Aggression, Property Destruction, Mood Swings, Anxiety, Depression, etc. YES NO School : Base –Time 3 p<.000 Home: Base –Time 2 p<.007 Home: Base-Time 3 p<.000

128 FEW Cohort Study Parent and Youth Satisfaction Always Never Parent : Base –Time 3 p<.000 Youth: Base –Time 2 p<.007 Youth: Base-Time 3 p<.000


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