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1 Engaging the on-line learner Andrew Hill February 2006.

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1 1 Engaging the on-line learner Andrew Hill February 2006

2 2 what we’d like to achieve  Aims of this session: Group members to consider how to engage learners in on-line courses and be aware of the challenges posed in this type of e-learning  Intended outcome: A range of ideas for activities that might be suitable to meet the key phases of engagement in an on-line course.

3 3 are your on-line learners dying of boredom?  how would you know?  what can we do about it?

4 4 what is on-line learning?  learning over the intranet or intranet  real-time: synchronous  non-real-time: asynchronous

5 5 the challenge  to keep learners engaged whilst you’re not present  in a normal session you can monitor reactions  eye contact  detect body language  in synchronous on-line learning this can be difficult  in asynchronous on-line learning it’s impossible!

6 6 what is ‘engaged learning’?  how do we know when a learner is engaged?  can we actually engage someone when on-line and we’re not even present?

7 7 the tutor’s split role  providing information  providing guidance

8 8 on-line sources of information  especially for asynchronous on-line learning as not present to provide when required  recorded presentations  text books, notes, illustrations  web-based resources  libraries  guest speakers  other students  members of the community

9 9 providing guidance  a challenge when you’re not present  answering questions

10 10 documented study guides  normal guidance that can be accessed on-line  course outlines  module guides  assignment guides  activity guides  orientation and help resources

11 11 learning activities  the key is that learners DO something  not just reading content  include opportunities to interact  learner to tutor  learner to learner  learner to content  remember: clear guidance is required!

12 12 successful interactivity  Enjoyable and engaging  Positive and supportive  Active  Collaborative  Contextual  Differentiates e-learning from self-study  Allows learners to define and construct knowledge  Creates a learning community  Provides practice with feedback  Stimulates and motivates learners  Promotes social experiences rather than independent ones Kathleen Iverson – E-Learning Games: Interactive Learning Strategies for Digital Delivery, Pearson Prentice Hall 2005

13 13 4 phases of engagement  learning the tools  ice breakers  team activities  learner-led activities Rita Marie Conrad & J Ang Donaldson, Engaging the on-line learner, Jossey- Bass 2004 ISBN

14 14 other kinds of activities  reflection activities  how a learner might transfer learning to their job or a task  authentic activities  working on real projects or in a realistic environment  games and simulations  not necessary to use the expensive ones - many available now free  example example  ahi2000.com/studyzone/ links2.htm

15 15 engage your on-line learners  think of an activity for each of the 4 phases  now, can they be made to work in an on-line class? tools ice team lled

16 16 acknowledgements  Rod Corbett, University of Calgary  Rita Marie Conrad & J Ang Donaldson, Engaging the on-line learner, Jossey- Bass 2004 ISBN  Kathleen Iverson – E-Learning Games: Interactive Learning Strategies for Digital Delivery, Pearson Prentice Hall 2005  Greg Kearsley, Theory Into Practice (TIP) database  On-line Tutoring e-Book, Heriot-Watt University and The Robert Gordon University,http://otis.scotcit.ac.uk

17 17

18 18 Andrew Hill E-learning Co-ordinator LSDA and Dunstable College


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