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Fire Hoses and Appliances Firefighter II Module A McHenry County College Firefighter II Class Spring Semester 2002.

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Presentation on theme: "Fire Hoses and Appliances Firefighter II Module A McHenry County College Firefighter II Class Spring Semester 2002."— Presentation transcript:

1 Fire Hoses and Appliances Firefighter II Module A McHenry County College Firefighter II Class Spring Semester 2002

2 FIRE HOSES and APPLIANCES See list of objectives given to you prior to class. Identify is classroom Demonstrate is “hands-on”

3 REFRRENCES IFSTA Essentials, 4 th Edition, Chapter 12 Delmar, Firefighter’s Handbook, copyright 2000, Chapter10

4 Fire Hoses and Appliances Identify the construction features of hose 2-7.1

5 Material from which hose is made: Cotton Nylon Rayon vinyl Poly-mired vinyl Polyester

6 Construction methods: Braided Wrapped Woven jacket Poly-mired covered

7 Fire Hoses and Appliances Identify the types of fire hose

8 Types of fire hose Booster Line – Braided – ¾ inch and 1 inch Attack Line – Woven-jacket or poly-mired covered – 1 ½ inch, 1 ¾ inch, 2 inch, 2 ½ inch, and 3 inch Supply Line – Woven-jacket, poly-mired cover, rubber – 2 ½ inch, 3 inch, 4 inch, 5inch, 6 inch

9 Intake Line Woven jacket, poly-mired, or wrapped Hard suction and/or soft suction Also know as soft or hard sleeve

10 Fire Hoses and Appliances Identify the types of fire hose damages and their preventions

11 Mechanical Damage Worn spots Rips Abrasions Cracked inner lining Crushed or damaged couplings

12 Mechanical Damage Prevention Avoid laying or pulling hoses over sharp corners. Provide warning devices to divert traffic. Prevent vehicles from running over hoses and couplings. Close nozzles slowly. Change the bends in the hose when re-bedding. Provide chaffing blocks Avoid excessive pump pressures on hose lines.

13 Thermal Damage Charring Melting Drying out of rubber lining

14 Thermal Damage Prevention Protect hose excessive heat/fire. Do not allow hose to remain in heated area after drying. Use a moderate temperature for drying Keep outer jacket dry. Run water through hose that has not been used for some time. Avoid drying hose on hot pavement and/or direct sunlight Prevent hose from being laid to close or form coming in contact with vehicle exhaust. Use hose bed covers to shield hose from elements. Freezing temperatures(snow and ice) also damage hose.

15 Mildew/Mold Damage(Organic) Decay Mold Mildew Deterioration

16 Chemical Damage Exposure to petroleum products Exposure to run off Exposure to alkali and acids Exposure to chemical materials and vapors

17 Organic Damage Prevention All wet hose should be removed from apparatus, and replaced with good, dry hose. Hose should be removed, inspected, swept, and reloaded every thirty days if not used. Exercise hose every thirty days. Run water through all hose every 90 days.

18 Chemical Damage Prevention Thoroughly scrub all traces of acid contacts with baking soda and water. Periodically remove hose from the apparatus, wash it, and run water through it. Properly test hose if any suspicion of damage. Avoid laying hose in the gutter. Properly dispose of hose that has been exposed to hazardous materials and cannot be decontaminated.

19 General Care and Maintenance of Hose Brush of loose dirt and such – broom Washing hose – Several different ways Wash with warm water and a mild soap Commercial or generic hose washers Rinse hose with water in different are than washed

20 General Care and Maintenance of Hose Drying hose – Rubber jacket hose can be re-bedded wet, woven jacket and such cannot! – Use commercial hose dryer – Hang in hose tower

21 General Care and Maintenance of Hose Storing – Should be stored rolled – On acceptable racks – Well ventilated room

22 Fire Hoses and Appliances Identify the construction features of fire hose couplings

23 Materials Brass alloy Aluminum alloy Magnesium

24 Types of Couplings Threaded Storz (pronounced stortz) Others – Quarter turn – Oil filled rocker jug – Snap or Jones

25 Manufacturing Techniques of Couplings Drop forged: hardest Extruded: somewhat weaker than drop forged Cast: weakest

26 Threaded Couplings Three piece – Used on intake hoses Five piece – Usually found on appliances and adapter fittings

27 Parts of Couplings Shank Swivel Higbee cut and Indicator Lugs

28 Shank Also called tailpiece, bowl, or shell Male has rocker lugs or pins Female shank is smooth

29 Swivel Contains female threads Permits coupling without turning hose Has rockers/lugs/pins Shanks is smooth

30 Higbee Cut and Indicator On both couplings Special type thread designed to provide a positive connection between couplings Indicator is a shallow indention of one of the lugs Helps eliminate cross threading

31 Lugs Pin – Not to common anymore, usually older hose – Tends to snag when hose is dragged Rocker – Rounded to prevent hang ups – Found on all modern hose – Usually two to three lugs Recessed – Usually found on booster lines

32 Storz Couplings “Sexless” – No distinct male and/or female coupling Coupled by a 1/3 turn Newer ones have locking components to prevent water pressure spinning of hose Grooved lugs Insert rings built into the swivel

33 Care of Fire Hose Couplings All parts of couplings are susceptible to damage Male threads can be damaged if not protected Female threads are not exposed, but the swivel is subject to bending damage

34 Care of Fire Hose Couplings Avoid dropping and/or dragging Do not permit vehicles to ride over them Examine couplings when washing hose Clean threads to remove tar, gravel, and oil Inspect gasket, and replace if cracked or creased Remove the gasket and twist the swivel in warm, soapy water.

35 Care of Fire Hose Couplings Swivel gaskets and expansion gaskets should be tested after use and/or cleaning of the hose. Swivel gasket- used to make the connection water tight. Expansion Ring Gasket- used at the end of the hose where it is expanded into the shank of the coupling. See pictures. Pinch the gasket between together between the thumb and index finger. This usually show any defects or signs of determination.

36 Hose Rolls Identify the uses of hose rolls

37 Straight Roll Placed in storage Returned to quarters for washing Loaded back on the apparatus

38 Donut Roll Situations when it is going to be deployed directly from a roll for use. Used when both ends to be together.

39 Twin Donut Roll Used for a compartment roll which may be transported and used for high-rise operations. Self-Locking Twin Donut – Same as above, except a carrying strap is formed.

40 Forward and Reverse Hose Lays Identify the difference between a forward and a reverse hose lay

41 Hose Lays Forward Lay Reverse Lay Split Lay

42 Forward Hose Lay Also called a straight lay. From the water source to the scene. – Laid form the water source to the fire.(tagging the hydrant) Hose bed set up with female coupling coming off first. Primary advantage is that pumper is at fire scene so hoses, tools, etc. can easily and quickly e obtained. Operator also visual contact with crew and react better to changing conditions.

43 Forward Hose Lay Disadvantage – Longs lays are near impossible and smaller diameter supply lines (21/2 and 3 inch) may need a second pumper to boost pressure. – One firefighter must be left at the hydrant to secure the water supply.

44 Reverse Hose Lays Hose is laid from the fire scene to the water source. The pumper must first stop at the scene, do a size up and drop the supply line. Should be loaded with the male coupling coming off first. Usually done with relay operations and/or drafting operations.

45 Reverse Hose Lays Disadvantages – Essential tools and equipment are located far from the fire scene This is also done when the initial engine attacks the fire and the second engine lays a supply to the initial attack engine.

46 Split Lays Two lines laid forward Two lines laid reverse Reverse lay followed by a forward lay Two lines laid forward followed by one or two lines laid reverse Two lines laid reverse followed by the one or two lines laid forward.

47 Precautions while Advancing Hose Lines Identify precautions to be followed while advancing hose lines to a fire

48 Advancing Hose Lines Safety!!!!!!!!! Be alert for potential dangers especially of backdrafts, flashover, and potential or occurring building collapse. All firefighters should be on the same side of the hose. Check door for heat!, before you open it. Bleed excess air from hose line and check nozzle pattern before entering. STAY LOW! Avoid blocking ventilation openings such as doors and windows.

49 Loading Hose Some General Guidelines.

50 Hose Loading Check gaskets and swivels before connecting any hose. When two sections are connected keep flat sides on same plane. Hand tighten connections. When the hose is bent to load, smooth the bend. Avoid loading hose so that the coupling “turns”. Use a “dutchmen” to prevent this. For LDH load all couplings in the front of the bed. Do not pack hose tightly.

51 Hose Rolls Identify three (3) types of hose rolls

52 Straight Roll Lay hose out straight and flat on a clean surface. Roll male coupling over onto hose to start the roll. Form a coil that is open enough to allow the fingers to be inserted. Continue rolling the coupling over onto the hose, forming an even roll. As the roll increases in size, keep edges aligned. Lay roll flat on ground when completed. Using a foot, tamp any protruding coils down into the roll.

53 Donut Roll 2 Methods Method One – Lay section of hose flat and in a straight line. – Start the roll from a point 5 to 6 feet off center towards the male coupling. – Roll towards female end. – Leave sufficient space at center loop to insert the hand for carrying. – Near the completion of the roll, the male coupling is enclosed within the roll as the hose is rolled over it. – Check to make sure the male coupling is inside the roll with the female coupling about 3 feet ahead of it.

54 Donut Roll 2 Methods Method 2 – Grasp coupling and carry to other end. – Check to make sure the looped section laying flat, straight, and w/o twists. – Face coupling ends and start rolling 2 ½ feet from bend towards male coupling. – Pull the female side back to relieve tension. – As roll approaches the male coupling, lay the roll flat on the ground and bring the female end around the male coupling to complete the roll.

55 Twin Donut Roll Place the male and female couplings together. Lay the hose flat w/o twisting, to form two parallel lines from the loop end to the couplings. Fold the loop end over and upon the two lines to start the roll. Continue to roll both lines simultaneously towards the coupling ends, forming a twin roll with a decreased diameter.

56 Self-Locking Twin Donut Roll Place the male and female couplings together. Lay the hose flat, w/o twisting, to form parallel lines from the loop end to the couplings. Move one side of the hose up over 2 ½ to 3 feet to the opposite side w/o turning. Adjust the size of this shoulder loop to the proper length for carrying. Facing the coupling ends, bring the back side of the loop forward toward the couplings, and place it on top of where the hose crosses forming a loop on each side w/o twist.

57 Self-Locking Twin Donut Roll Start rolling towards the opposite ends, forming two rolls side by side. When rolls are completed, allow the couplings to lie across the top of each roll, and adjust the loops, one short and one long, by pulling only one side of the loop through. Place the long loop through the short loop, just behind the couplings, and tighten snugly forming a shoulder sling.

58 Coupling and Uncoupling Procedures Identify different types of coupling and uncoupling techniques

59 Coupling Hoses Foot Tilt Method – Stand facing the two couplings so that one foot is near the male end. – Place the foot directly on the hose behind the male coupling and apply pressure to tilt it upward. – Position feet apart apart for balance. – Grasp the female end by placing one behind the coupling and the other hand on the coupling swivel. – Bring the two couplings together and turn the swivel clockwise with the thumb to make the connection.

60 Coupling Hoses Female Coupling – Grasp female coupling with both hands. – Bring both couplings together. – Align them using the Higbee indicator. – Turn the female coupling counterclockwise until a click is heard. – Turn the female coupling clockwise until tightened.

61 Uncoupling Hose Knee Press Method – Grasp the hose behind the female coupling. – Stand the male coupling on end. – Set feet well apart for balance. – Place on knee upon the hose and shank of the female coupling. – Snap the swivel quickly in a counterclockwise direction as body weight is applied to loosen the connection.

62 Uncoupling Hose Firefighter Stiff Arm Method – Take a firm two-handed grip on your respective coupling and press the coupling toward the other firefighter, thereby compressing the gasket in the coupling. – Keep arms stiff, and use the weight of both bodies to turn each hose coupling counterclockwise, thus loosening the connection.

63 Hose Carries Identify different types of hose carries

64 Hose Carries Shoulder Loads (from flat or horseshoe loads) – Attach nozzle to end of hose. – Position carrier at tailboard facing in the direction of travel. – Place the initial fold of hose over the carrier’s shoulder so that the nozzle can be carried chest high. – Bring the hose from behind over the shoulder so the first fold ends at the knee and the rear fold ends at the back of the knee.

65 Hose Carries – Complete the above procedure for each carrier until the desired length of hose is loaded. – Uncouple the hose from the bed when desired length is loaded. – Hand the coupling to the last carrier.

66 Hose Carries Shoulder Loads (from flat or accordion loads) – Facing the hose bed, grasp the nozzle and the number of folds needed to make the desired length. – Pull the folds about one-third of the way out of the bed. – Twist the folds into an upright position. – Turn and pivot onto the folds placing them on top of the shoulder. – Make sure the hose is flat with the nozzle and/or coupling in front of the body.

67 Hose Carries Hose Carry/Drag – Stand along side the hoseline and pick up the nozzle or coupling. – Place the hoseline over your shoulder with the coupling (nozzle) in front, rest it on chest. – Hold the coupling in place while pulling with your shoulder, arm, and legs dragging hose to desired location.

68 Hose Carries Hose Drag/Carry – Stand alongside hoseline and pick up the nozzle or coupling. – Walk 25 feet. – Place the hoseline over your shoulder with the coupling in front resting it on your chest. – Walk 25 feet. – Pick up hose with other hand. – Hold coupling in place while pulling with your shoulders, arms, and legs dragging the hose to the desired location.

69 Hose Loads and Finishes Identify the different types of loading hose loads or finishes

70 Accordion Load Lay the first length of hose in the bed on edge against the partition with the coupling at the rear of the bed. At the front of the bed, fold the hose back on itself, and lay it back to the rear next to the first length. At the rear of the hose bed, fold the hose so that the bend is even with the rear edge of the bed, and then lay the hose back to the front. Continue laying hose folds across the bed staggering the fold so that every other bend is approximately two inches shorter than the edge of the bed. When another tier must be started, angle the hose upward to the front of the bed.

71 Horseshoe Load Place the female coupling in a front corner of the hose bed with the hose on edge and against the wall Make a fold at the rear even with the edge of the hose bed Lay the hose to the front and then around the perimeter of the bed so that it comes back to the rear along the opposite side Make a fold at the rear in the same manner as Step #2. Lay the hose back around the perimeter of the hose bed inside the first length of hose.

72 Horseshoe Load Lay succeeding lengths progressively inward towards the center until the entire space is filled Stagger the folds so that every other bend is approx. 2 inches inside adjacent bends Start the second tier be extending the hose from the last fold directly over the front corner of the bed, laying it flat on the hose from the first tier.

73 Flat Load Lay the first length of hose flat in the bed against the partition with the coupling to the rear of the bed Fold the hose back on itself at the front of the hose bed and lay it back to the rear of the bed on top of the previous length At the rear of the bed, fold the hose so that the bend is even with the rear edge of the bed Lay the hose back to the front of the bed, angling it to make the front fold adjacent to the previous fold. Continue with the second tier in the same manner Make the fold so the second tier is 2 inches shorter than the first tier.

74 Reverse Horseshoe Load Connect the wye to the end of the supply hose at the rear of the bed Place the wye in the center of the bed with the two male openings toward the rear Connect one 1 ¾ hose to wye Lay the hose on edge to the front of the bed and make a fold Lay the hose back to the rear alongside the first length From a “U” at the edge of the bed, return the hose to the front of the bed, make a fold.

75 Reverse Horseshoe Load Lay the hose back inside the previously laid length I the same manner as before Continue the above step until the entire length of hose is loaded Wrap the male end of the hose once around the horseshoe loops Form a small loop by bringing the end back under the loops and over the top Attach the nozzle and place it inside the small loop Pull the remaining slack hose back into the horseshoe to tighten the loop

76 Straight Finish Loosely flake the last two or three sections of hose back and forth across the hose bed on top of the hose load Attach any appliances or tools necessary to the hose

77 Minuteman Load Connect first section to the discharge port Lay the hose flat in the bed to the front, with the remaining hose laid out to the front of the bed to be loaded later. (If the discharge is in front, the hose is first laid to the rear and then back to the front) Couple remaining hose together and attach nozzle Place the nozzle on top of the first length at the rear Angle the hose to the opposite side of the bed Make a fold and lay the hose back to the rear Make a fold at the rear of the bed and angle the hose to the other side to the front of the bed

78 Minuteman Load Continue until all is loaded Connect the male coupling of the first length to the female coupling of the last section and lay the remainder of the hose from the first section in the bed, as before

79 Triple Layer Load Connect the female coupling to the discharge Extend the hose out in straight line Pick up the hose at a point 2/3 of the distance from the bed and carry it to the bed, laying the hose such that three layers are formed Using several people pick up the entire length of the three layers of hose Begin loading the hose by folding the hose over the three layers and into the bed Fold the layers over at the front of the bed and lay them back to the rear top pf the previously laid hose Continue loading the hose in this “S” fashion until the entire length is loaded

80 Unloading Hose Loads and Finishes Identify different types of unloading hose loads or finishes

81 Pulling Pre Connected Wyed Hose Lines Grasp nozzle and small loop of one bundle and pull it from the bed Lay the bundle on the ground when it clears the tailboard of the apparatus Pull the opposite bundle the same way Pull the wye and attached hose from the bed and lay it on the ground near the tiers Place one arm through the horseshoe loops of one bundle and lay off one loop at a time to desired location Repeat the process for the other bundle

82 Pulling Pre Connected Hose Line Flat Load Put one arm through the longer loop and grasp the shorter loop with same hand Grasp nozzle with the hand NOT used to grasp the loops Pull load from the bed using the pull loops Walk toward the fire When the hose pulls taunt, release the hand loop When the shoulder loop becomes taunt, drop it to the ground Proceed towards the fire until the hose is fully extended

83 Pulling a Pre Connected Hose Line Minuteman Load Grasp the nozzle and bottom loops(if provided) Pull the load approx. 1/3 out of the bed Face away from the apparatus and place the hose load on your shoulder with the nozzle against the stomach Walk away from the apparatus pulling the hose out of the bed by the bottom loop Permit the load to play off from the top while walking towards the fire Drop any remaining hose on the ground when desired location is reached

84 Pulling a Pre Connected Hose Line Triple Layer Load Place the nozzle and fold of the first tier over the shoulder while facing the desired direction of travel Walk away from the apparatus, pulling the hose completely off the bed When the bed is cleared, drop the folded end from the shoulder Continue to advance the nozzle towards the desired location

85 Lengthening Hose Line Using a Hose Clamp Identify the procedure for lengthening a hose line using a hose clamp

86 Lengthening Hose Line Using a Hose Clamp Bring additional sections of hose to the nozzle end of the hose Crack the nozzle open slightly Apply hose clamp about 3 feet behind nozzle Remove nozzle Attach new section(s) of hose Reattach nozzle Slowly release clamp allowing water to flow to nozzle

87 Lengthening Hose Line Using a Break Apart Nozzle Identify the procedure for lengthening a hose line using a break apart nozzle

88 Lengthening Hose Line Using a Break Apart Nozzle Bring additional sections of hose to the nozzle end of the hose Remove the tips ahead of the nozzle with the nozzle in the OFF position Attach hose and another nozzle Slowly open break apart nozzle

89 Replacing Hose Using Two Different Methods Identify the procedures for replacing a section of hose using tow different methods

90 Replacing Hose Using Kink Method Obtain sufficient slack in the hose line to from a loop Bed the hose over itself Apply body weight to the bends in the hose while placing one knee directly upon one of the bends Have someone else replace the section with two sections of hose Slowly release the pressure on the bend

91 Replacing Hose Using Hose Clamp Apply hose clamp approx. 3 feet behind the couplings Replace burst section of hose with two good sections of hose Release the clamp

92 Identify the use of hose and appliances on a pumper as required to be carried by NFPA

93 Definitions Appliance- A device other than a coupling that is used with the hose and through which water must pass Tool- A device that makes handling of hose and appliances easier. Some devices help protect hose against unnecessary wear and damage.

94 Appliances Valve Devices Wye Appliance- divides one hose line into two or more lines. Wye appliances are gated and may be controlled at the gate. Siamese Appliance- takes two or more hose lines and makes one hoseline or device. May or may not have a clapper. Usually used to overcome problems encountered due to friction loss in hose lays which need to carry a large flow or cover a long distance. Also used to supply ladder pipes that do not have permanent waterway.

95 Appliances Valve Devices Ball-used in pumper discharges and gated wyes. They are open when in line with the hose. Also used in the pumps themselves. Gate-used to control the flow of water from a hydrant Butterfly-used on LDH intakes. A quarter turn handle Clapper-used in Siamese's to allow only one intake hose to be connected and charged before additional hoses are added. It is flat hinged disk.

96 Appliances Valve Devices Water Thief- A variation of the wye. It has one (1) 2 ½ inch inlet and one (1) 2 ½ inch outlet and two (2) 1 ¾ outlets. Hydrant Valves- Used when the hose lay id made from from the water supply source to the fire scene. It allows for the initial supply to be charged and by using valves allows other lines to be connected w/o shutting down the hydrant.

97 Fittings Adapter Reducer Double Male Double Female Elbows Hose Caps- male couplings- 2 ½ “ discharge on pump panel Hose Plugs- female couplings- 2 ½” intakes on pump panel

98 Intake Device Hose strainers Two types – Barrel – Low level high volume Most commonly used in drafting operations

99 TOOLS

100 Tools Hoist (hose roller) Jacket Clamp Spanner, hydrant wrench, rubber mallet Bridge Chaffing block Strap, rope, chain

101 Hoist Also called hose roller – Hose can be damaged when dragged over sharp corners or edges – The roller consists of a metal frame with a roller in the middle that is either secured with rope or a “c”- clamp

102 Hose Jacket Placed over a section of hose that bursts or develops an aneurysm (bulge) It is applied at the point of rupture on the hose line Usually comes in 2 ½” and 3” sizes It allows the line to be flowed at full pressures It can also be used to connect hose with mismatched or damaged screwed couplings

103 Hose Clamp Used to stop the flow of water – To prevent hose in the hose bed to be charged – To allow replacement for burst sections – To allow extension of a hoseline w/o shutting down water supply – To allow advancement of a charged line upstairs – 3 types Screw down Press down Hydraulic press – Keep at least 20 feet behind apparatus – Apply approx. 5 feet from the incoming water side – Stand to one side when applying or releasing the press down hose clamp

104 Spanner, Hydrant Wrench, Rubber Mallet Spanner – For tightening and loosing hose connections – It has a wedge for prying – Openings that fit gas meters – Slot for pulling nails – Flat surface for hammering Hydrant Wrench – Used to open a hydrant Rubber Mallet – Used to strike lugs

105 Hose Bridge/Ramps Helps to prevent injuries to hoses where they cross streets where vehicular traffic cannot be diverted Also used over small spills to protect hoses

106 Chaffing Blocks Used to prevent hoses from being abraded from vibrating on cement, asphalt, curbs, etc. during operations Can be made from wood, leather, or old truck tires

107 Hose Straps/Ropes/Chains Also called rope hose tool – Used to carry and/or pull fire hose – Also provides a means to handle and secure pressurized hoses – Especially to ladders

108 Advancing Uncharged Hose Lines Identify the procedures for advancing uncharged attack lines from a pumper

109 CAUTION! An uncharged hose line should never be advanced into a fire or through a door that is hot to the touch. The line should be charged and the nozzle person should bleed the air from the nozzle and select the proper pattern before ever entering the fire area.

110 Into a Structure Select hose line, properly remove from rig, and deploy toward entrance Nozzle person and back up person on same side of hose Nozzle person at nozzle and back up person a few feet back, if available the third person is midway between end of first section of hose and coupling Fell the door for heat. This can give an indication of extreme heat build up, signifying the potential for a flashover or backdraft Stay low and do not block ventilation openings

111 Up a Ladder to Second Floor Landing Select hose line, properly remove from rig, and deploy to base of ladder If carrying a shoulder load lay it to the left side of the ladder Nozzle person takes nozzle and pulls it under left arm pit, across the chest and over right shoulder, so nozzle rests in the small of the back Nozzle person, with both hands free, climbs the ladder to the second floor landing Nozzle person steps off ladder onto the building, second firefighter drapes large loop of hose over his/her shoulder and starts up the ladder.

112 Up a Ladder to Second Floor Landing The above process continues until an adequate amount of hose has been advanced

113 Up an Inside Stairway to an Upper Floor Select hose line, properly remove from rig, and deploy to the base of the stairs Advance up stairway feeding hose off of a shoulder load if used Lay the hose on the stairs against the outside wall to avoid sharp kinks and bends Once desired landing is reached, excess hose can be flaked up the stairs toward the floor, above the fire and looped back down (use extreme caution when placing FF’s above the fire floor w/o a charged line) When the hose line is in place, nozzle person prepares to advance the line

114 Up an Inside Stairway to an Upper Floor If possible FF’s should be placed at every turn or point of resistance to assist deployment

115 Down an Inside Stairway to a Lower Floor Select hose line, properly remove from rig, and deploy to the base of the stairs Advance down stairway feeding hose off of a shoulder load if used Lay the hose on the stairs against the outside wall to avoid sharp kinks and bends Have all hose in place when reaching fire floor When hose line is in place, nozzle person has line charged, bleeds off air, checks pattern and prepares to advance line If possible FF’s should be placed at every turn or point of resistance to assist deployment

116 Down an Outside Stairway to a Lower Floor See last slide

117 To an Upper Floor by Hoisting See other slides, in addition Lower rope of appropriate length from intended destination Have a hose roller, if available Fold nozzle end of hose line back over the rest of the hose until an overlap of four or five feet is formed Tie a clove hitch w/ an overhand safety around the tip of the nozzle and the hose it is folded against Place a half hitch on the doubled hose about 12 inches from the loop end

118 Advancement of Charged Hose Lines Identify the procedures for advancing charged attack lines of two different sizes. From a pumper, given the necessary equipment and operating as a member of a team for the following evolutions

119 Into a Structure See uncharged hose line slide

120 Up a Ladder to a second Floor Landing See uncharged hose line, with these additions Bleed nozzle at base of ladder CAUTION- – Charged hose lines should only be advanced up a ladder when absolutely necessary! – And the ladder is secured by rope hose tools or ladder straps

121 Up an Inside Stairway to an Upper Floor See uncharged hose line slide

122 Up an Outside Stairway to an Upper Floor Same

123 Down an Inside Stairway to a Lower Floor Same

124 Down an Outside Stairway to a Lower Floor Same

125 To an Upper Floor by Hoisting Only change is – Tied around the tip of the nozzle about one foot below the coupling and the nozzle – Tie a half hitch w/ through the nozzle bale and around the nozzle itself in a manner that allows the rope to hold the nozzle shut while it is being hoisted

126 Operating Charged Attack Line from a Ground Ladder

127 CAUTION OPERATING A HOSE LINE FROM A GROUND LADDER RREQUIRES THE LADDER TO BE SECURELY TIED AND HEELED.

128 Operating a Charged Hose Line from a Ground Ladder Hose brought to base of ladder where it is charged and bled Nozzle person and FF’s space themselves on the ladder within reach of each other Each FF ties into the ladder with a leg lock of ladder belt Using both hands the hose line is then pushed upward from FF to FF The nozzle person projects the nozzle through the ladder rungs allowing for approx. I foot to be extended beyond the rungs at the level, and secures ladder w/ straps or belt

129 Operating a Charged Hose Line from a Ground Ladder Secure the hose w/ ladder belt or rope hose tool several rungs below the one on the nozzle person is standing on Once the hoseline, nozzle, and all FF’s are tied in and secure the nozzle can be opened slowly

130 Carrying a 100-foot Attack Line into a Building, Connecting it to a Standpipe, and Advancing the Line From the Standpipe

131 Carry 100 feet minimum of at least 1 ½ hoseline to one floor below fire floor Detach building hoseline or remove outlet cap Check the connection for adapters and foreign objects in the discharge Connect the fire dept. hose to the standpipe connection. It is good practice to connect a gated wye to the connection before the attack line is connected Advance the hoseline up to the fire floor: any extra hose could be flaked up the stairs toward the above the fire

132 When FF’s are in position to effect the attack, the line is charged and the nozzle is bled Check the door with the back of ungloved hand, if appropriate open the door slowly and in maintain control of the door and advance line toward fire

133 Making Hydrant Connections

134 Valve Stem Operating Nut Discharge Can be only (2)-2 ½” or (2)-2 ½ and (1)-4” Discharge Cap

135 3” or smaller Intake Line Remove intake hose, hydrant wrench and other necessary items from rig Unroll the hose Connect hose to pumper Place hydrant wrench on hydrant valve stem operating nut w/ handle pointing away from outlets Remove appropriate caps FULLY open and close the hydrant to make sure there is water and nothing blocking discharge outlets Connect the hose(s) to the hydrant, using adapters, if need be

136 3” or smaller Intake Line FULLY OPEN HYDRANT Tighten connections that leak

137 4 ½ ” or Larger Soft Sleeve Same as 3”

138 4 ½ ” or Larger Hard Intake FF #1 – Make sure booster tank valve is closed – Remove pump intake cap – Assist with the removal of the hard suction from the pumper – Assist with the connection of the hard suction to the pumper – Assist with the connection of the hard suction to the hydrant – FULLY OPEN THE HYDRANT – Tighten any connections that leak – Note: Steps can be reversed depending on SOP’s

139 4 ½ ” or Larger Hard Intake FF #2 – Remove hydrant wrench and any adapters from pumper – Remove hydrant outlet cap – Place hydrant wrench on h.v.s.o.n. w/ handle facing away from outlets – Open and close hydrant (FLUSH) – Place adapter on 4 1/2 “ outlet, if necessary – Assist with the removal of the hard suction from the pumper – Assist with the connection of the hard suction to the pumper – Assist with the connection of the hard suction to the hydrant – Note: Steps can be reversed depending on SOP’s

140 Hand Lay 300 feet of Supply Line (2½” of Larger) from a Pumper to a Water Source Hoseline Drag – Stand alongside hose line and pick up nozzle or coupling – Place hose line over shoulder with coupling (nozzle) in front resting on your chest – Hold coupling in place while pulling with shoulders

141 Continued Load Shoulder – Stand with back to engine – 2 nd FF stacks hose back and fourth on shoulder w/loops at waist length – Max 100 ft. per FF – Move forward 15 ft.

142 Continued Unload – First to get loaded is last to unload – All walk toward objective – FF closest to hose bed begins to flake out hose – Once out of hose, net FF starts to drop. Repeat until at objective or run out of hose

143 THE END


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