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Robin Wright University of Minnesota. “Such a site would search like Google, recommend like Amazon, vet like Consumer Reports, annotate like Wikipedia.

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Presentation on theme: "Robin Wright University of Minnesota. “Such a site would search like Google, recommend like Amazon, vet like Consumer Reports, annotate like Wikipedia."— Presentation transcript:

1 Robin Wright University of Minnesota

2 “Such a site would search like Google, recommend like Amazon, vet like Consumer Reports, annotate like Wikipedia. Done well, this interface would provide a core of information, tools, and networks for undergraduate biology educators.” ws/2009/15586.jpg

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5 First steps Peter Bruns (HHMI) Malcolm Campbell (Davidson College) Erin Dolan (University of Georgia) Sarah Elgin (Washington University, St. Louis) Sarah Goodwin (ASCB, IBioSeminars) Jo Handelsman (Yale University) Bill Wood (University of Colorado, Boulder) Robin Wright (University of Minnesota)

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8 David Asai Sean Carroll sphotos/fruitfly.html david-asai-undergraduate-science-education- program-director

9 AboutFor AuthorsSearchBrowseContact Most RecentHighest RatedFeatured Why meiosis matters: The Case of the Fatherless Snake Robin Wright, University of Minnesota Course(s): Genetics, Cell Biology Using an interesting case of virgin births in snakes to motivate students to learn the mechanisms of meiosis and develop scientific thinking skills. Article CollectionRecent News and Announcements Search: Links to news stories worth noting Announcements from funding agencies Meetings and Conference Announcements Links to articles in other journals More… Sign In: Username Password Forgot your password? Sign Up! Learning Objectives: Describe, using diagrams, the sequence of events involving DNA in meiosis from chromosome duplication through chromosome segregation. Explain how meiosis is different from mitosis. Given an offspring’s genotype, predict the stage(s) of meiosis that could have been abnormal Propose a testable hypotheses to explain observations Find articles based on keywords Find articles linked to National Reports Filter articles based on several parameters Sort articles based on Course BiochemistryCell BiologyDevelopmental BiologyGeneticsMicrobiologyPlant Biology Browse Courses

10 Article Collection Biochemistry Developmental BiologyGenetics Microbiology Cell Biology Filter By: Course Level AudienceClass Size Bloom’s Level Active Learning Strategy Search Results: Why meiosis matters: The Case of the Fatherless Snake Robin Wright University of Minnesota Sort by : Search: Probiotics: What’s in a name? Jessamina Blum University of Minnesota Class Type Science Process Skills Date Learning Objectives Describe, using diagrams, the sequence of events involving DNA in meiosis from chromosome duplication through chromosome segregation. Explain how meiosis is different from mitosis. Given an offspring’s genotype, predict the stage(s) of meiosis that could have been abnormal Propose a testable hypotheses to explain observations Learning Objectives Define probiotics and their uses Explain the current FDA guidelines defining probiotics Evaluate health claims made by probiotic products using primary literature Vision & ChangeArticle Type Activity Length PCASTSFFP Plant Biology AboutFor AuthorsSearchBrowseContact

11 Articles published in CourseSource support the principles of Scientific Teaching. As a result, articles are categorized based on Learning Objectives and associated Course Topics. Sample Learning Objectives were provided by professional societies to highlight what undergraduate students should know after completing a course in their discipline. To browse articles, first select a Course or Category below and then navigate through the Course topics to find Learning Objectives and articles. To see all the Learning Objectives associated with a particular Course, first click on the Course and then click on the link at the top of the page. BiochemistryCell BiologyDevelopmental BiologyGeneticsMicrobiologyPlant Biology Scientific Communication Science Process Skills Vision & Changeetc Browse by Course: Browse by Category: AboutFor AuthorsSearchBrowseContact

12 Genetics Interpreting patterns of inheritance (1) Chromosome structure and function (3) Molecular biology of gene function Methods and tools in Genetics Mechanisms of inheritance (1) Gene linkage and mapping (2) Population genetics Genetic variation (2) Genetics of model organisms (1) Epigenetics, genetics and ethics (1) Why meiosis matters: The Case of the Fatherless Snake Robin Wright, University of Minnesota Learning Objectives Describe, using diagrams, the sequence of events involving DNA in meiosis from chromosome duplication through chromosome segregation. Explain how meiosis is different from mitosis. Given an offspring’s genotype, predict the stage(s) of meiosis that could have been abnormal Propose a testable hypotheses to explain observations Learning Objectives provided by Genetics Society of America AboutFor AuthorsSearchBrowseContact

13 At a Glance AssessmentsFrameworkComments Related Articles References Why meiosis matters: The Case of the Fatherless Snake Robin Wright, University of Minnesota Lesson Framing Question What are the mechanisms by which an organism’s genome is passed on to the next generation? Learning Objectives Describe, using diagrams, the sequence of events involving DNA in meiosis from chromosome duplication through chromosome segregation. Explain how meiosis is different from mitosis. Given an offspring’s genotype, predict the stage(s) of meiosis that could have been abnormal Propose a testable hypotheses to explain observations Active Learning Strategies Interactive lecture, Think-pair-share, Story telling, Small and larger group discussion, Optional drawing/labeling Assessment Strategies Interpretation of diagrams of meiosis, drawing chromosomes at different stages of meiosis, clicker-type questions Inclusive Teaching Strategies Potential to engage many individuals since questions about reproduction are typically very interesting to many people, story can relate to some religious perspectives Mark as Favorite ShareDownload Shares 8,561 Like/Comment Cell BiologyGenetics LikesViews 1458 AboutFor AuthorsSearchBrowseContact Lesson Lessons The Science behind the Lesson Reviews Reviews of Teaching Materials Essays Announcements Lessons The Science behind the Lesson Reviews Reviews of Teaching Materials Essays Announcements

14 Abstract This lesson…. Introduction When I was a graduate student, one of the staff in our department at Carnegie-Mellon University told me about her involvement in a women’s group that met annually in the woodlands of Pennsylvania to “frolic in nature.” My recollection of her description of this group suggested that an important topic of their conversation was how to eliminate the need for men in human society. I learned from her that a variety of vertebrates could produce babies without any involvement of sperm and, therefore, of males. She introduced me to the Beltsville White turkey breed, which produces unfertilized eggs that can hatch into little male turkeys that can go on to mate and produce viable offspring. I was fascinated with both the idea that an unfertilized egg could actually hatch to produce a viable baby bird (!) and that the baby bird would be male. Fast forward about 10 years. I was teaching non-majors’ biology at the University of Washington and trying to interest my students in the stages of mitosis. After several abortive attempts spanning several years, I boiled it down to just metaphase and the products – if they could just line the chromosomes up at metaphase and identify the products of cell division, we’d call it a day. Abstract Introduction Activity & Assessments Teaching Notes References Materials Why meiosis matters: The Case of the Fatherless Snake Robin Wright, University of Minnesota AboutFor AuthorsSearchBrowseContact At a Glance AssessmentsFrameworkComments Related Articles References Lesson Shares 8,561 LikesViews 1458 Cell BiologyGenetics Lesson Mark as Favorite ShareDownload Like/Comment

15 January 2014 Jess Blum, Managing Editor Robin Wright, Editor in Chief Sue Wick (University of Minnesota) Kathy Miller (Washington University, St. Louis) Peter Bruns (HHMI), Malcolm Campbell (Davidson College), Erin Dolan (University of Georgia), Sarah Elgin (Washington University, St. Louis), Sarah Goodwin (ASCB, IBioSeminars), Jo Handelsman (Yale University) and Bill Wood (University of Colorado, Boulder)


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