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Why CAP? Seminar 2.1 CAP Corporate Learning Course Presentation Design Modifications By Lt Colonel Fred Blundell TX-129 th Fort Worth Senior Squadron For.

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Presentation on theme: "Why CAP? Seminar 2.1 CAP Corporate Learning Course Presentation Design Modifications By Lt Colonel Fred Blundell TX-129 th Fort Worth Senior Squadron For."— Presentation transcript:

1 Why CAP? Seminar 2.1 CAP Corporate Learning Course Presentation Design Modifications By Lt Colonel Fred Blundell TX-129 th Fort Worth Senior Squadron For Local Training Only Rev Oct-2012  EMERGENCY SERVICES  AEROSPACE EDUCATION  CADET PROGRAMS

2 Objectives 1.Explain the overall mission of CAP 2.Describe the activities CAP performs up to the national level 3.Explain the professional development available to a CAP member outside their wing’s capability 4.Explain some of the intangible benefits of CAP professional development 5.Provide information on “why CAP” to prospective members 2

3 CAP – With over 65 years performing “Missions for America”  95% of continental U.S. search and rescue  Disaster relief  Communications  Counter drug  Homeland Security  Aerospace Education  Cadet Programs  Chaplain Services 3

4 What does CAP do that few other organizations do?  Volunteer force performs real and constant missions that benefit community, state and nation. 4

5 What are some examples of the types of missions that CAP is well known for? 5

6 What training does CAP offer its members?  Specialty Track Training  Region Staff College  National Staff College  Region/Wing Commanders Course  Inland SAR Planner Course  Squadron Officer School  Air Command and Staff College  Air War College 6

7 How does CAP interact with communities, state, nation and USAF?  MOUs with community and state officials  USAF Liaison (Working with JROTC instructors)  Region evaluations and inspections/audits 7

8 What standards do CAP members comply with? Members must:  Be felony-free before being accepted  Have fingerprint screening for cadets and senior members  Meet membership requirements in CAPR 39-2, Chap. 3, para. 3-2  Become familiar with the operations and requirements of CAP  Complete Level I  Enroll in a specialty track (Professional Development progression is covered in CAPR 50-17) 8

9 How do regulations and inspections ensure standards are maintained?  CAP Publications are found on-line  Training includes understanding regulations  CAP and USAF conduct unit inspections (SUI), survey audits, and compliance inspections (CI) to ensure national standards are met 9

10 What is the progression of the professional development program for senior members? 10

11 Conclusion Why CAP?  An opportunity to join a highly trained and skilled organization of dedicated volunteers to serve community and nation.  Develop current skills and learn new skills  Work with others from all walks of life  Help young people become responsible citizens and future leaders  Learn more about aerospace and air power  Serve your fellow man in the performance of meaningful missions encompassed by search and rescue, disaster relief, and homeland security 11

12 Spread the Word……….. The Civil Ait Patrol should be a very visible part of every community. Talk about CAP programs, show the exceptional products we offer our members, and share our website at in every venue you can. Get perspective members as excited about this organization as you are!www.cap.gov 12

13 CORE VALUES CORPORATE LEARNING COURSE Seminar 2.2 CORE VALUES

14 Objectives Recognize the impact of employing Core Values in our decision making Describe various ways to apply our CAP Core Values to planning, processes and operations Develop strategies to implement Core Values 14

15 Fundamental American beliefs - Life, Liberty, pursuit of happiness - Common good, justice, equality, diversity - Rule of law, individual rights - Freedom of religion and press - Civilian control of the military 15

16 The guiding principles for CAP THE CAP CORE VALUES 1. INTEGRITY 2. EXCELLENCE 3. VOLUNTEER SERVICE 4. RESPECT 16

17 How to apply Core Values to CAP life - CV is not just the commanders responsibility - Leaders do set the climate of the organization - Leaders are Core Values role models - Leadership on CV must come from below, and above - CV discussed and internalized at all levels 17

18 Conclusions Core Values are the glue that holds units and members together. As CAP leaders we must know the core values, articulate them, plan for them, and demonstrate them in every way. Practice them ourselves and expect no less from those with whom we serve. 18

19 MISSION POSSIBLE: RESOURCES AT WORK CORPORATE LEARNING COURSE Seminar 2.3 MISSION POSSIBLE: RESOURCES AT WORK

20 SAFETY PLEDGE “I pledge to do my part to foster a safe environment during all CAP activities, to be a responsible steward of CAP resources and to fully prepare myself for the challenging missions that serve America.” 20

21 Objectives 1.Foster responsible stewardship of CAP resources. 2.Identify availability of resources, competing needs, and develop analytical skills for making effective decisions. 3.Identify applicable regulations governing management of CAP resources. 21

22 General Types of Resources Available 1.Money 2.Equipment 3.People 4.Time 5.Facilities 22

23 Defining Our Needs  Our missions generally define our overall needs  Our regulations and policies often prescribe the manner in which we acquire and track them. 23

24 Tools Available to Identify Available Resources 1.Headquarters website 2.Capwatch – information about the number of members in each unit and their training levels. 3.MIMS (emergency services qualifications of members) 24

25 Decision Making Exercise 25

26 Conclusions How can we be responsible stewards of CAP resources? 26

27 CAP Structure, Purposes and Procedures CORPORATE LEARNING COURSE Seminar 2.4 CAP Structure, Purposes and Procedures

28 28 Various entities make up CAP’s world: – The Board of Governors (BOG) – CAP National Board (NB) – CAP National Executive Committee (NEC) – CAP-US Air Force (CAP-USAF) – CAP Wing – National Headquarters (NHQ) Corporate Structure

29 29 CAP Organizational Chart

30 30 The governing body of CAP. – Established in 2001 by the Secretary of the Air Force. – Comprised of 11 members, four members appointed by the SECAF, four members appointed by CAP and three members representing interested organizations. Mandated to meet at least twice per year. The Board of Governors (BOG The Board of Governors (BOG)

31 31 Comprised of 67 members – National Commander, Vice Commander, 8 Region Commanders, 52 Wing Commanders, 6 National Staff Officers, CAP-USAF Commander. – Membership either through election or appointment. – Two members do not have voting privileges. Mandated to meet at least twice per year. CAP National Board (NB CAP National Board (NB)

32 32 Comprised of 15 members – National Commander, Vice Commander, 8 Region Commanders, 6 National Staff Officers, CAP-USAF Commander – Membership either through election or appointment. – Two members do not have voting privileges. Mandated to meet at least twice per year. CAP National Executive Committee (NEC)

33 33 Staffed by active duty Air Force and civil service personnel. Comprised of a Commander, Vice Commander and various directorates such as operations, legal, training and safety, Liaison Regions and State Directors – CAP-USAF Commander is the Air Force program manager for the CAP. – Commander is member of NB and NEC. CAP-US Air Force (CAP-USAF CAP-US Air Force (CAP-USAF)

34 34 Operational Unit of the organization. – Comprised of a Commander, Vice Commander, various wing staff, Group, Squadron and Flight Commanders. – Wing Commander is a member of NB as well as the only corporate officer for the Wing. CAP Wing Structure

35 35 Located at Maxwell Air Force Base – Led by the Executive Director who is hired by the BOG. – Staffed by paid employees that are specialists in various professional fields general counsel, financial management, safety, inspector general, logistics and operations. HQ staff are hired by the Executive Director. NHQ Structure

36 36 – Encourage citizens to contribute to the good of the nation through volunteer service. – Provide aviation education and training to it’s members and local citizens. – Encourage and foster civil aviation in local communities. – Provide volunteers to assist in local emergencies. – Assist the Air Force in non-combat programs and missions. CAP’s Purpose

37 37 Govern, direct and manage the affairs of the corporation. – Determine long range plans for CAP. – Adopt and amend Constitution and By-laws. – Directs improvements in CAP programs, financial positions, legislative relations and membership development. – Oversees various programs and boards. BOG Purpose

38 38 Conducting the business of CAP. – Adopt regulations effecting how CAP performs its day to day operations. – Recommend policy to the BOG. – From a strategic perspective ensures CAP is positioned to perform it’s missions. – Give direction to the Region/Wing. NB/NEC Purpose

39 39 Oversee all activities conducted by CAP when they are performed as the USAF Auxiliary. – Responsible for the day to day Air Force support, advise, liaison and oversight of CAP. – Monitors the spending of all federally appropriated funds used by CAP. – Provide advise and assistance to CAP Regions and Wings. CAP-USAF Purpose

40 40 Conduct the day to day operations of the organization. – Ensure the regulations adopted by the NB are carried out at the squadron level. – Wing CC has a dual role of NB corporate officer and a commander directing the activities of the wing members. CAP Wings

41 41 Administers the day to day affairs of CAP. – Translates the will of the BOG and National Board into written regulations, manuals and pamphlets. – Maintains records relating to the operations of the corporation. – Coordinates with the Regions and Wings. HQ Civil Air Patrol

42 42 Outlined in written form through regulations, manuals, pamphlets and policy letters. – Not discretionary. – Same in all CAP entities. Corporate Procedures

43 43 Structure defines who we are and how we present ourselves to our clients, fellow citizens and communities. Purpose goes to our heart and why we volunteer our time and efforts for our country. Procedures show that we are disciplined in our endeavors.Conclusion

44 THE CAP/USAF RELATIONSHIP CORPORATE LEARNING COURSE Seminar 2.5 THE CAP/USAF RELATIONSHIP

45 Objectives Explain the history of the CAP-USAF partnership in your own words Illustrate how the Air Force provides resources to CAP Discuss how the relationship between CAP and the USAF benefits both organizations 45

46 Ai r Force and Reserve forces support CAP - On Base facilities - Reservists augment numerous CAP functions - Reservists help develop CAP courses - Both act as instructors for various CAP courses - Air Force courses available through AFIADL - Support for PME concepts of CAPO members 46

47 How is CAP a force multiplier for the AF? - Allows airmen to perform primary duties - CAP provides cost effective service - CAP helps communities stay drug free - Com. and tech training serve the AF - Cadet programs shape leaders - AE materials stress math and science - CAP builds character 47

48 How do CAP and USAF work together? - Relief efforts in national emergencies - Cost benefit to taxpayers - Reduction of illegal drug activity - Career motivation - Leadership training - Flight instruction 48

49 Conclusions Understanding how the Air Force supports CAP can enhance individual member effectiveness. CAP also provides a great deal of support to Air Force missions. Understanding that a strong CAP/USAF relationship positively impacts on the capabilities of both organizations. Let’s work to make it a smooth relationship! 49

50 Broadening Horizons Seminar 3.1

51 As a leader in CAP, personal interest needs to transition to corporate responsibilityLeadership 51

52 is the motivations, needs, and goals that the individual desires for Civil Air Patrol to meet in their lives “Personal Interest” 52

53 is the acceptance of the roles in CAP that maintain the organizational standards, goals, missions and values. “Corporate Responsibility” 53

54 Train those who want training Award those who have achieved Guide those who want purpose Assign those who want responsibility How the needs and goals of individuals can be fulfilled in CAP 54

55 Everyone follows the regulations The wing is a bridge between the unit and national Customer service Elements of the corporate responsibility 55

56 Unit and Wing Perspectives Panel Discussion 56

57 Introduction to Teamwork and Group Development CORPORATE LEARNING COURSE Seminar 3.2 Introduction to Teamwork and Group Development

58 What is “teamwork” and why is teamwork important to CAP? 58

59 Objectives Discuss the concept of “teamwork” Discuss the concept of “group development” Describe ways to build and maintain teamwork within the group Illustrate teamwork skills 59

60 Concept of Teamwork 60

61 Concept of Group Development Cog’s Ladder 1.Polite Stage 2.Why We’re Here Stage 3.Power Stage 4.Cooperation Stage 5.Esprit Stage 61

62 Building and Maintaining Teamwork Teamwork Do’s 1. Articulate a goal with which everyone can identify. 2. Ensure each member has a job; value the contributions of each member 3. Have a communications system that allows each member of the team to contribute and receive direction. 4. Foster an environment conducive to team work. 5. Provide effective feedback. 6. Provide motivation. Teamwork Don’ts 1. Try not to micromanage. 2. Don’t withhold information. 3. Don’t lose sight of the goal. 62

63 How do you maintain team cohesion? 1.Use the team. 2.Ensure all members of the team are actively engaged. 3.Resolve problems within the teams quickly and fairly. 4.Remember that building a team is an ongoing process. 63

64 Teamwork Exercise 1.Observer and note taker assigned. 2.Exercise guidance will be provided minutes allowed to perform the exercise. 4.Observer will discuss observations using four criteria:  How did the team evolve?  Identify the roles of each team member.  How did the team interact with one another ?  What process did they use to form the problem solution? 5. What are your impressions of the quality of teamwork your team experienced as they progressed through the exercise? 64

65 Summary 1.Teamwork involves working together, agreeing on the same end result and the method for achieving the result in a unifying way that makes it happen. 2.Group development implies that people come together to do something together. Groups can be assigned to together to perform a certain task, they can be part of a pre-existing entity or they can spontaneously come together. What binds the group together is a common goal or mission. 3.Ways to build and maintain teamwork within a group are: Articulate a goal; Ensure each member has a job; foster good communication; Build a sense of trust and respect; Provide positive feedback; and provide motivation. 4.Teamwork skills are illustrated by the exercise and group dynamics. 65

66 The Heart of a Volunteer CORPORATE LEARNING COURSE Seminar 3.3 The Heart of a Volunteer

67 Unpaid Professionals

68 1. Recognition – To receive recognition for efforts and work done on behalf of the organization 2. Appreciation – To be valued by those in positions of authority and respect within the organization 3. Contribution – To be given opportunity, training and resources to forward the mission and purpose of the organization The Needs of Volunteers 68

69 Volunteering is Rewarding

70 1. The intensity of the three needs varies with each individual 2. People need to see the needs of others met 3. People need to see a consistency in the meeting of needs. (fairness) 4. People want the chance to meet the needs of others. (Role of authority in CAP) People Join CAP to Have Their Needs Met 70

71 Create a list of names of people who should be recognized or appreciated by you Create a list of appropriate responses Know how to use CAP awards Create a Personal Tool Kit for Meeting the Needs of Others 71

72 Conclusions Members have needs, just like the unit or the organization has needs Individuals have differing needs of varying intensity Meeting their needs and having them meet the needs of others is a two-way street 72

73 CAP Corporate Learning Course Teambuilding Block - Seminar 3.4 CAP Corporate Learning Course ManagementPrinciples

74 Objectives 1. Describe basic management principles 2. Describe the concepts of span of control and unity of command 3. Describe characteristics of some of the leading management theories 4. Compare and contrast leadership and management 74

75 Introduction – What does it mean to be a good manager?  Good managers impact others in positive ways.  Good managers are a valuable resource in our personal and professional lives.  (Your response) _____________________________________ 75

76 Four Management Principles (or Functions) 1.Planning  Determine Goals  How goals will be achieved  Decision making 76

77 Four Management Principles (or Functions) Cont. 2. Organizing  Reflect on plans and objectives  Establish major tasks  Divide major tasks into subtasks  Allocate resources  Evaluate the results of your strategy 77

78 Four Management Principles (or Functions) Cont. 3. Influencing  Achieve the organization’s goal by motivating, directing, or leading  Effective communication 78

79 Four Management Principles (or Functions) Cont. 4. Controlling  Making things happen as planned  Monitor the progress being made by your workers  Gathering information and measuring performance 79

80 Span of Control and Unity of Command Span of Control and Unity of Command Span of Control  Number of individuals a manager supervises  Span of Control and Span of Management are the same term Unity of Command  Individual should have one boss  Too many bosses cause inefficiencies and ineffectiveness 80

81 Management Theories The Classical Approach  Scientific Management  Classical Organization Theory The Behavioral Approach  Increase production by understanding the people  Hawthorne Studies Theory X and Theory Y  Theory X – lazy, lacks initiative, dislikes work  Theory Y – full of initiative, self-directed and committed to the organization  Involves expectations and assumptions about people Management by Objectives  Manager and subordinate set goals with understanding that subordinate’s job performance would be judged by achieving goals – Peter Drucker 81

82 Leadership vs. Management Leadership  Guiding the behavior of others  Directs people to accomplish objectives Management  Concerned with more than just people such as all the other resources available to them  Broader scope than leading  Effective managers are probably good leaders 82

83 Exercise Baseball Team Who’s Who:  Divide into teams with 3-6 members  Select a group leader for each group  Using the clues provided, try to determine who plays each position on a baseball team  Solve the problem and analyze how your group leader led you through the process and how the group interacted during the decision making 83

84 Summary I. The four principles of management are: Planning – Determining the organization’s goals and deciding how best to achieve them. Organizing – Assigning tasks to various individuals or groups; puts plan into action. Influencing – Guiding the activities of the organization’s members. Controlling – Making things happen as planned and monitoring the progress made by your workers. II. Span of Control refers to the number of individuals a manager supervises. Unity of Command means that an individual should only have one boss. 84

85 Summary (cont.) III. Management theories include: The Classical Approach which identifies planning, organizing, leading and controlling as important managerial concepts The Behavioral Approach which strives to increase production by understanding the people Theory X and Theory Y which involved the positive or negative assumptions a manager would make about people Management by Objectives which involved manager and subordinate setting goals that would influence the job performance evaluation of the subordinate 85

86 IV. The distinction between leadership and management is that leadership is guiding the behavior of others and management is concerned with more than just people (all resources must come together to accomplish the goal). Summary (cont.) 86

87 Planning and Decision Making Corporate Learning Course Seminar 3.5 Planning and Decision Making

88 Objectives 1. Define planning in an organizational setting 2. Describe the steps in the planning process 3. Explain the importance of strategic planning to an organization 4.Identify the two components in the process of decision making 5.Describe the context factors associated with decision making 6.Explain the decision support process 88

89 Decision making is crucial to effective managing… 89

90 The Planning Process 1.State organizational objectives 2.List alternatives for reaching objectives 3.Develop assumptions about each alternative 4.Choose the best alternative 5.Develop plans to pursue the chosen alternative 6.Put the plans into action 90

91 Types of Planning Strategic Planning  Long-range planning that focuses on the entire organization  Involves managers at the highest levels  3-5 years for long-range planning  Strategies must be consistent with the purpose and mission of the organization 91

92 Types of Planning (cont.) Tactical Planning  Short-term planning  One year or less  Mid-level managers  More detailed than strategic planning 92

93 Types of Planning (cont.) Contingency Planning  What an organization does when something unexpected happens or when something needs changing  May cause manager to go back to the original plan or look for other alternatives  “What if” way of thinking 93

94 Two Components of Decision Making  Judgment – a process of evaluating alternatives  Choice – a process of selecting a specific alternative to implement 94

95 Characteristics of Human Information Processors  Selective perception – select relevant information and ignore irrelevant information  Framing – how a decision is oriented and organized  Escalation of commitment to a failing course of action – failure to ignore sunk costs (investments that are already gone and cannot be recovered)  Risk propensity – the orientation of the decision maker to either seek risk or avoid it  Hindsight bias – inability of a decision maker to remember correctly the circumstances that existed prior to implementing a choice once action has been taken  Over-confidence, complacency – give yourself credit for being more capable than you are / becoming more comfortable with a situation than is warranted by the level of risk 95

96 Context Factors for Decision Making  Degree of Certainty | | | | | Certainty Risk Uncertainty Ambiguity  Urgency – how quickly do you have to decide  Importance – how much impact will the decision have  Life-span of Problem/Opportunity – how likely is the issue to go away on its own 96

97 Creating a Decision Support Process 1.Recognize need for a choice 2.Diagnose causal relationships 3.Identify criteria for evaluation of alternatives and establish weights for criteria 4.Identify all relevant alternatives 5.Assess each alternative against the criteria – the judgment process 6.Determine “score” for each alternative 7.Choose alternative with “best” score 97

98 Steps in Decision Making 1.Identify the problem. 2.List alternatives. 3.Select the best alternative. 4.Implement the chosen alternative. 5.Evaluate. 98

99 Models of Individual Decision Making  Classical – aka Rational, Economic  Administrative – aka Behavorial  Intuitive – aka Seat of the Pants Selection  Political  Social 99

100 Summary 1.Planning determines how an organization can get to where it wants to go. 2.Steps in the planning process include: Stating organizational objectives, Listing alternatives for reaching objectives, Developing assumptions about each alternative, Choosing the best alternative, Developing plans to pursue the chosen alternative and putting the plans into action. 3.An organization needs strategic planning to develop strategies for achieving the objectives consistent with the purpose and mission of the organization over a long-range period. 100

101 Summary (cont.) 4. Two components in the process of decision making are judgment and choice. 5. The context factors associated with decision making are:  Selective perception – Select the relevant information and ignore the irrelevant information  Framing – how a decision is oriented and organized  Escalation of commitment to a failing course of action – failure to ignore sunk costs (investments that are already gone and cannot be recovered)  Risk propensity – orientation of the decision maker to either seek risk or avoid it  Hindsight bias – the inability of a decision maker to remember correctly the circumstances that existed prior to implementing a choice  Over-confidence, complacency – give yourself credit for being more capable than you actually are, being more comfortable with a situation than is warranted by the level of risk 101

102 Summary (cont.) 6. The decision support process includes:  Recognize need for a choice  Diagnose causal relationships  Identify criteria for evaluation of alternatives and establish weights for criteria  Identify all relevant alternatives  Assess each alternative against the criteria – the judgment process  Determine “score” for each alternative  Choose alternative with “best” score 102

103 Exercise – Winter Survival 1.Divide class into 2-3 groups of 5-7 people 2.Present situation 3.Rank items according to importance to your survival 4.Background information 5.Score results with key 103

104 Best Practices CORPORATE LEARNING COURSE Seminar -- Best Practices

105 Objectives Explain the concept of “best practice.” Discuss how using best practices can be helpful to a CAP unit. Discuss a methodology for using best practices at the unit. 105

106 What is a best practice? ? 106

107 Two questions for you… What are some of the challenges in your unit? What are some of the opportunities in your unit? 107

108 The Four Keys Understand the challenge/opportunity Know how to research Having an open mind Having a methodology 108

109 Conclusions Best practices can make your unit more effective. Many units share the same challenges and opportunities. We can also share our solutions. Doing so is a… best practice. 109

110 MENTORING CORPORATE LEARNING COURSE Seminar 3.7 MENTORING

111 Objectives The objective for this lesson is for each student to comprehend that effective mentoring can improve the quality of a members experience in CAP Define mentoring in your own words Explain how mentoring can create a caring organizational climate Defend the relationship between mentoring and the quality of a members CAP experience 111

112 Explore the concept of mentoring - One senior individual - Available to junior member - To form a developmental relationship - To guide the performer - Through operational or professional prep - Provide feedback 112

113 Who should be a mentor - Awareness of the needs of others - Willing to listen - Willing to divert time from other things - Willing to commit to the relationship - Emotionally ready 113

114 What should the protégé bring? - Be a willing participant - Assist in setting goals - Be responsible for own performance 114

115 - Stimulate enthusiasm and commitment - Develop leadership skills - Enhance loyalty - Promote flexibility and persistence - Positive response to crisis What are the long term effects? 115

116 Conclusions - Mentoring is a special relationship - The purpose is to help someone along the road - Mentors help discover dreams, understand strengths, show gaps in impact on the organization and others - Mentor guides through the steps of your plan - Relationship based on candor, trust, and support 116


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