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Session 2.3: Skills for Supportive Supervision Module 2: Managing Human Resources Leadership and Management Course for ZHRC Coordinators and HTI Principals,

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Presentation on theme: "Session 2.3: Skills for Supportive Supervision Module 2: Managing Human Resources Leadership and Management Course for ZHRC Coordinators and HTI Principals,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Session 2.3: Skills for Supportive Supervision Module 2: Managing Human Resources Leadership and Management Course for ZHRC Coordinators and HTI Principals, and ZHRC/HTI Management Teams

2 Learning Objectives By the end of the session, participants will be able to:  Define supportive supervision.  List three key competencies for supervisors.  Describe different supervisory roles. 2

3 What is “supportive supervision?” 3 Supervision is the process of directing and supporting staff so that they may effectively perform their duties. - Stinson et al, 1998 Supervision is a complex mix of skills that will help you improve the quality of your organization. - MSH & UNICEF Supportive Supervision = Process + Skills

4 Why is supportive supervision important?  Supportive supervision helps to: Motivate staff to do a good job Ensure high-quality work and services Detect and solve problems Prevent future problems Train staff to improve their capacity to perform Give feedback Monitor implementation of activities Gather suggestions to improve processes 4

5 Components of Supportive Supervision  Mentoring  Providing constructive feedback  Joint problem-solving  Two-way communication between supervisors and supervisees 5

6 Heart of Supportive Supervision 6 Set Goals Listen Cultivate Accountability Supportive Supervision

7 Guiding Principles for Supervisors  Be supportive.  Work as a team member to model supportive supervision.  Talk with and listen to all levels of staff.  Recognize jobs well done.  Solve problems on the spot, when possible.  Provide feedback in a constructive way.  Involve staff in decision-making processes.  Never criticize staff in front of a client or other employees. 7

8 Activity: Reflecting on Supervision  Positive Supervisors Think of an excellent supervisor. What were their actions/behaviours? How did they make you feel? How did it affect motivation and performance?  Challenging Supervisors Think of a frustrating supervisor. What were their actions/behaviours? How did they make you feel? How did it affect motivation and performance? 8

9 Supervisor Competencies  Gain acceptance as a supervisor  Develop individual employee workplans  Maintain high level of staff performance  Conduct formal performance reviews  Deal with performance problems  Manage conflict between employees  Counsel troubled employees  Demonstrate time management skills 9

10 Gain Acceptance as a Supervisor  A successful supervisor earns the respect of their workgroup. 10 Know Your Staff Communicate Openly Listen Advocate Be Consistent Respect Problem- Solve

11 Develop Employee Workplans  Meet with each employee individually  Jointly develop performance objectives for a specified time period (3, 6, 12 months)  Review workplans regularly, change as needed  Supervisor and employee should agree on: Major areas of responsibility Performance standards 11

12 One-on-One Meetings  Regularly scheduled Weekly, or every 2 weeks Rarely missed!  Focus on the staff member Discuss progress, challenges, successes Problem-solve together as needed Provide positive feedback, and corrective or constructive feedback as needed  Aim for minutes  Do not conduct meeting in public, if possible  Notes can help guide future follow-up 12

13 Maintain High Performance  Motivate your staff to achieve their best work. Thank Staff Reward High Performance Listen Skill Development Keep Staff Informed Give Feedback Involve in Decisions Support Staff Celebrate Success Create Good Work Climate 13

14 Conduct Performance Reviews  Formal opportunity to review overall performance  Meet with employees individually Review entire workplan, assess performance Provide feedback, set goals Develop action plan, professional development plan  Regularly scheduled basis (6-12 months)  Incorporate employee’s comments in documentation  May include peer feedback  OPRAS system provides some guidance 14

15 Dealing with Performance Problems  Approach performance issues constructively. Give feedback Work collaboratively to problem-solve Look for underlying causes, try to address them  If necessary, pursue disciplinary action or termination. 15

16 Managing Conflict  Conflict is inevitable.  Conflict is not always negative! It can help teams grow, consider new ideas, and produce good solutions  Address and prevent destructive fighting and politics  Promote and model productive, healthy conflict 16

17 Counselling Troubled Staff  Staff may need support, flexibility or assistance when dealing with a personal difficulty Personal difficulties can impact work performance  Support staff to resolve personal difficulties Respect privacy, confidentiality Offer flexible schedule, re-assess workplan, allow leave (as appropriate) Adhere to appropriate policies Refer to an outside source for assistance, if possible 17

18 Time Management  Finding time to supervise well is challenging! 18 PrioritizeDelegate Plan Ahead Build in “Free” Time Minimize Interruptions Ask for Advice/Support

19 Different Roles of Supervisor 19 Role Model Teacher Motivator Mentor

20 Supervisor as Role Model  Model performance standards  Provide guidance for acceptable & unacceptable behaviour  Walk the talk! 20

21 Supervisor as Teacher  Provide information  Build employee skills  Effectively deliver needed information so employees can understand and learn  Develop employee potential to learn 21

22 Supervisor as Motivator  Encourage others to achieve desired results  Create enthusiasm and commitment in others  Aim to understand what motivates each individual 22

23 Supervisor as Mentor  Serve as a wise and trusted guide and advisor  Help staff achieve what they never thought or believed they could  In mentor role, the supervisor does not direct the employee’s work 23

24 Key Points  Supervisors carry great influence over their staff.  Supportive supervision involves processes and skills.  Supportive supervision is linked to staff motivation, quality, successful implementation of activities and projects, problem-solving, and quality improvement.  Supervisors can serve as role models, teachers, motivators, and mentors to their staff. 24


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