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1 Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) Fleet Renewal Presented to the Queen’s Conference on New Paradigms for Defence Procurement and Industrial Policy Panel 1 “Understanding.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) Fleet Renewal Presented to the Queen’s Conference on New Paradigms for Defence Procurement and Industrial Policy Panel 1 “Understanding."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) Fleet Renewal Presented to the Queen’s Conference on New Paradigms for Defence Procurement and Industrial Policy Panel 1 “Understanding NSPS – Ship Designs and Contracts” By Director General Maritime Force Development Monday 27 February 2012

2 2 Purpose Requested to discuss: “ships to be built in relation to Canada’s strategic needs in the overall framework of NSPS” “designs of the first batches of ships to be built” “progress made so far on surface combatants and joint support ships in terms of time frames, designs and anticipated costs” Outline purpose and nature of a Navy how big and what kind of a Navy RCN Force Development Strategy RCN pre- and post- Canada First Defence Strategy (CFDS) RCN Fleet Renewal On Ship Designs and Canadian Innovation next steps Purpose and Outline

3 3 On the Purpose and Nature of a Navy “A navy is a state’s main instrument of maritime force. What it should do, what doctrine it holds, what ships it deploys, and how it fights are determined by practical political and military choices in relation to national needs. Choices are made according to the state’s goals, perceived threat, maritime opportunity, technological capabilities, practical experience, and, not least, the way in which the state defines itself and its way of war.” George Baer, One Hundred Years of Sea Power The US Navy, (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1993)

4 4 How Big and What Kind of a Navy? number of ships and crews (quantity) and their characteristics (quality) is primarily a function of: (1) threat or risk to nation’s defence, security, and economic prosperity, as affected by country’ s size, geography, climate, ocean estate, trade dependencies, adversaries and allies (2) maritime defence and security output desired by Government (aka level of ambition or level of effort). There are two elements in this regard: non-routine output (surge) in times of tension, crisis or war how much of an insurance policy is desired? routine output in times of relative peace Ready Duty Ship; Surveillance; Sovereignty Patrols; Support to Other Government Departments (fishery patrols; drug interdictions; illegal migrant interceptions); Global Engagement (3) maintenance requirements of ships (4) personnel tempo (or Quality of Life) considerations of their crews (5) available resources (both for acquisition and through-life support of maritime capabilities)

5 5 RCN Force Development Strategy it is difficult to accurately predict the future this leads to a strategy of acquiring and maintaining balanced, multi-purpose, combat-capable maritime forces there is continuing requirement, within available resources, to achieve and maintain balance, as much as possible, in quantity and quality between: maritime combat capabilities: on, below and above the ocean surfaces, and on and above the near shore maritime combat and constabulary capabilities for: defence and security of North America and Canada international peace and security this Strategy is not new...

6 6 RCN (pre-CFDS) surface combatant four IROQUOIS Class Area Air Defence and Task Group Command and Control destroyers twelve HALIFAX Class general-purpose frigates sub-surface combatant three OBERON Class diesel-electric submarines combat support three underway replenishment ships above-surface combatant as acquired by the air component of the CF CF-188 Hornets CH-124 Sea King Maritime Helicopters CP-140 Aurora Maritime Patrol Aircraft coastal and mine warfare defence twelve KINGSTON Class Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels two Fleet Diving Units Outcome: a globally-deployable sea-control navy: capable of decisive action at sea residual capacity to contribute to operations ashore

7 7 RCN Way Ahead (as per CFDS 2008) surface combatant three Area Air Defence and Task Group Command and Control destroyers; first three Canadian Surface Combatants (CSC), with capabilities to support joint action ashore including air defence of forces ashore and Naval Fire Support [up to] twelve general-purpose frigates; remaining CSCs; with capabilities to support joint action ashore including Naval Fire Support sub-surface combatant four VICTORIA Class diesel-electric submarines combat support two (to three) Joint Support Ships above-surface combatant as acquired by the air component of the CF sixty-five F-35 Joint Strike Fighters twenty-eight CH-148 Cyclone Maritime Helicopters ten to twelve Canadian Multi-mission Aircraft coastal and mine warfare defence / coastal patrol six (to eight) Arctic/ Offshore Patrol Ships twelve KINGSTON Class Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels two Fleet Diving Units Outcome a globally-deployable sea-control navy: capable of decisive action at sea enhanced capacity to contribute to operations ashore

8 RCN Fleet Renewal (not to scale) 2012 JSS AOPS VICTORIA Class HCM CSC IROQUOIS Class MCDV (4 TG C2 Enhanced) By 2035, CFDS 2008 fully attained with enhanced capabilities/capacities across 6 CFDS missions CH 148 Cyclone CP 140 Aurora (AIMP Block III) Multi-mission Aircraft AOR 2015

9 9 On Ship Designs and Canadian Innovation RCN articulates the operational requirement DND/ Materiel Group, in collaboration with PWGSC and IC, and working with industry, develop ship designs that satisfy the operational requirement Canada, the RCN and the Naval Engineering Branch has a history of: domestic naval ship design and construction see Engineering Excellence in the RCN, by Michael Young, Canadian Naval Review, Vol 6, Number 1 (Spring 2010), pp naval innovation HMCS LABRADOR, St-Laurent and Restigouche class destroyers, helicopter Beartrap, hydrofoil BRAS D’OR, first all gas turbine ship (IROQUOIS), Canadian Electronic Warfare System (CANEWS), Shipboard Integrated Processing and Information Display System (SHINPADS), Shipboard Integrated Communications (SHINCOM), Shipboard Integrated Machinery Control (SHINMAC), IMCS (Integrated Machinery Control System)

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11 11 Next Steps beyond the recent National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS) shipyard announcement lie: individual naval Project (AOPS, JSS and CSC) shipbuilding contract negotiations ramping up naval (1) ship design, (2) Combat System Integration, (3) platform integration and (4) shipbuilding capabilities ramping up associated domestic supply chain the NSPS is premised on load-levelled shipbuilding over time; ship-related projects, current and future, need to be approved and implemented in a staggered fashion


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