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Dissemination How to Disseminate the Teaching American History Grant Lessons and Content Training? Recommendations.

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Presentation on theme: "Dissemination How to Disseminate the Teaching American History Grant Lessons and Content Training? Recommendations."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dissemination How to Disseminate the Teaching American History Grant Lessons and Content Training? Recommendations

2 Two Objectives IN DISTRICT Teams of TAH fellows turnkey lessons and content training to district teachers. LOCAL – STATE – NATIONAL SOCIAL STUDIES CONFERENCES Teams of TAH fellows travel to conferences and present to workshop participants.

3 IN DISTRICT Grade Level or Curriculum Based Content Training Is this About Pedagogy?Content Training? Should the Training Vary Dependent Upon Audience? Elementary – Middle - Secondary Should Turnkey Trainers be On the Same Grade Level as the Audience?

4 IN DISTRICT District In-service DaysGrade Level Meetings Using the TOOL/TAH Resources Develop a PowerPoint and Additional Support Materials that Train a Specific Group of Teachers in the Content of the Curriculum at that Grade Level Mixed Grade Levels Historical Dialogues Content Focus 18th-19th-20th Century Present Lessons Discuss content and research that supports the lesson

5 Even though England believed in a system of Mercantilism, Sir Robert Walpole espoused a view of "salutary neglect". This is a system whereby the actual enforcement of external trade relations was lax. He believed that this enhanced freedom for the colonists would stimulate commerce. Mercantilism The American Colonies were isolated from the Mother country. The commercial center of New York was located approximately 3400 miles from England's center of power, London. This distance created an independence of thinking from the Mother country that was encroached upon when England decided to become more involved in colonial affairs. SALUTARY NEGLECT SAMPLE OF GRADE LEVEL MEETING POWERPOINT

6 THE BIG PICTURE

7 GEORGE III AMERICA’S LAST KING By all accounts, George III was a good king who tried to rule wisely, but by 1776 American republicans viewed him as a bloody and corrupt tyrant. Diary Account of George III, July 4, 1776 “Nothing of importance happened today.”

8 THE CAUSES OF THE WAR OF INDEPENDENCE, New England militiamen prepare to meet the oncoming British regulars at the Battle of Breed’s Hill, just outside Boston, Massachusetts, June 17, 1775.

9 LEARNING FROM THE RANGERS A British officer (in red at left) assigned to Rogers’ Rangers learns about wilderness warfare from his Provincial allies. The dog is “Sergeant Beaubien,” which belonged to Captain John Stark, was listed on the rolls as a duly enlisted Ranger.

10 THE BRITISH ADAPT TO INDIAN WARFARE By combining light infantry tactics with their traditional discipline, British Redcoats learned to master Indians in wilderness warfare. Here the 42 nd Black Watch Highland Regiment drives home an attack at Bushy Run, Pennsylvania, August 5, 1763.

11 THE BRITISH EMPIRE IN NORTH AMERICA, (Right) A private or fusilier of the 23 rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Welch Fusiliers), circa fusilier

12 Proclamation of 1763 A royal decree was issued that prohibited the North American colonists from establishing or maintaining settlements west of an imaginary line running down the crest of the Appalachian Mountains.

13 TAXATION WITHOUT REPRESENTATION Proclamation of 1763 Proclamation of 1763 British Take Action: Paying for Protection 1. Sugar Act of Currency Act of Quartering Act of Stamp Act of 1765 a. Stamp Act Congress b. Sons of Liberty 5. Townshend Acts a. Boston Massacre b. Committees of Correspondence 6. Tea Act of 1773 a. Boston Tea Party 7. Intolerable Acts of 1774Sugar Act of 1764Currency Act of 1764Quartering Act of 1765Stamp Act of 1765Stamp Act CongressSons of LibertyTownshend ActsBoston MassacreCommittees of CorrespondenceTea Act of 1773Boston Tea PartyIntolerable Acts of 1774

14 THE STAMP ACT RIOTS England’s rulers were unprepared for the vehemence and the violence with which Americans would protest taxes not approved by their own colonial legislatures. Colonial mobs intimidated royal officials and destroyed public and private property.

15 THE SONS OF LIBERTY TAR AND FEATHER AN AMERICAN TORYTAR AND FEATHER Beginning with the Stamp Act Crisis of 1765, colonial opponents of British tax policy used intimidation and mob violence to nullify British authority.

16 IN-DISTRICT AND OUT OF DISTRICT CONFERENCES Workshop Title: Historical Dialogues: Content Focus in 18th and 19th Century American History Participants will receive 3 tested quality lessons that connect a particular historical focus through one century of time. Emphasis in the workshop will be on the historical content of the period as researched by the lesson development teams under the guidance of university scholars of American history. The lessons serve as a content guide for the workshop. History is a story and we are trying to make it memorable and interesting for students. Beginning teachers learn history. Veteran teachers/historians learn and add a great deal to the dialogue.

17 Middle States Council for the Social Studies 103 rd Regional Conference - Gettysburg Using the TOOL Project-Lessons–Web Site Lesson and Content Presentations by TOOL Fellows  The Compromise of 1850  The Nullification Crisis  The Know Nothings and the Native American Party  Nativist Riots of Philadelphia and the Rise of the "Know Nothings": 1840s and 1850s

18 COMPROMISES HAMILTONIAN vs. JEFFERSONIAN VIEWS

19 ARE COMPROMISES A GOOD THING? YES ABLE TO SATISFY BOTH SIDES AVOID CONFLICT OR WAR NO SIMPLY PUT THE SLAVERY ISSUE ON THE SHELF CIVIL WAR RESULTS ANYWAY

20 Constitutional Convention Despite beliefs of unalienable rights for all men, the founders had to compromise their views when it came to the slavery issue. A COLONIAL SLAVE-MARKET IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

21 THREE FIFTHS COMPROMISE

22 HAMILTON’S FINANCIAL PLAN EXCISE TAX ON WHISKEY PROTECTIVE TARIFF- To protect American industry from British competition ASSUMTION OF STATE DEBT NATIONAL BANK INDUSTRIALIZATION

23 JEFFERSONIAN VIEW STATES RIGHTS- VA and KT Resolutions FARMERS FRENCH REVOLUTION COMMON MAN AGRARIAN SOCIETY

24 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AND WESTWARD MOVEMENT Sectional tensions mount with the addition of new territories…

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26 NULLIFICATION CRISIS 1827 Protect American industry from British competition High tariff bill = $.37 on the dollar Andrew Jackson John C. Calhoun Henry Clay

27 JOHN C. CALHOUN

28 ANDREW JACKSON

29 HENRY CLAY

30 Northern View Need an American Policy that will support our UNITED States of America Stimulate our industry and protect our factories We cannot support foreign trade Better to buy American- will keep money in America Protect against the dependence on foreign goods by a tariff

31 Western View Tariff opposition from cotton and tobacco planters in the South Trade without a protective tariff will result in MISERY, BANKRUPTCY, and, RUIN. We buy from abroad everything we eat, drink and wear Factories of the New England states need to succeed to buy wheat, corn, and hogs form the western farmers

32 Southern View Foreign cotton is serving as a major competition to our domestic cotton It is British policy to buy cotton that buys the most manufactured goods from them The protective tariff will destroy our cotton economy as it will result in ending trade between the British and the United States Favors the interests of the northern factory system only

33 Reactions South Carolina’s Exposition and Protest Force Bill of 1832 Compromise of 1833

34 Despite the resolution of the Tariff of 1833 and the nullification of the Force Act, Calhoun states his fear that, “the struggle, so far from being over,” had just begun.

35 The wedge between the North and South was deepened…

36 COMPROMISE OF 1850 New land after war with Mexico Clay is back CA free state UT and NM = popular sovereignty D.C. = slave trade abolished Congress would not interfere with interstate slave trade Strict Fugitive Slave Act

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38 Passage of this law was so hated by abolitionists that its existence played a role in the end of slavery a little more than a dozen years later. This law also spurred the continued operation of the fabled Underground Railroad. Fugitive Slave Act 1850

39 “SEC. 7. And be it further enacted, That any person who shall knowingly and willingly obstruct, hinder, or prevent such claimant, his agent or attorney, or any person or persons lawfully assisting him, her, or them, from arresting such a fugitive from service or labor, …shall, for either of said offences, be subject to a fine not exceeding one thousand dollars, and imprisonment not exceeding six months…”

40 “a law which no man can obey without the loss of self respect” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

41 KANSAS- NEBRASKA ACT 1854 Opening new territories to slavery by popular sovereignty offset the balance between slave and free states. The abolitionists would not stand for it.

42 BLEEDING KANSAS Free Soilers – anti- slavery settlers who moved into the area to vote against slavery Pro-slavery forces from Missouri went across the border to vote in Kansas Both sides resort to violence

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44 Now, if it is deemed necessary that I should forfeit my life for the furtherance of the ends of justice, and mingle my blood further with the blood of my children and with the blood of millions in this slave country whose rights are disregarded by wicked, cruel, and unjust enactments - I submit - so let it be done!

45 “A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe that this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved – I do not expect the house to fall – but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become either all one thing or another.”

46 New Jersey Council for the Social Studies Fall Conference – East Windsor Workshop Presentation Using The TOOL Project–Lessons– Web Site Lesson and Content Presentations Constitutions of Carolina New Brunswick Public Schools Navigation Acts of the Colonial Period Monroe Township Schools, Middlesex County Boston Tea Party East Brunswick Public Schools


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