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. Thank you goes out to Bonnie Knapp and Ron Landbeck for Putting this information together.

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Presentation on theme: ". Thank you goes out to Bonnie Knapp and Ron Landbeck for Putting this information together."— Presentation transcript:

1 . Thank you goes out to Bonnie Knapp and Ron Landbeck for Putting this information together.

2 Pet CPR and First Aid Emergency Procedures for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Emergency Procedures for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Basic First Aid Basic First Aid

3 First Aid Assessment Think Safety, Think Safety, assess the dog’s behavior first! assess the dog’s behavior first! Prepare to restrain Prepare to restrain Look for injuries, nose to tail Look for injuries, nose to tail Do not put fingers in mouth of awake dogs Do not put fingers in mouth of awake dogs Administer First Aid Administer First Aid Contact nearest Animal Hospital Contact nearest Animal Hospital Transport if warranted Transport if warranted

4 Restraint Always use caution Always use caution Speak in a Calm Voice. Speak in a Calm Voice. Any pet that is in Pain CAN BITE!! Any pet that is in Pain CAN BITE!! Muzzle if pet is alert enough to bite and is painful. Muzzle if pet is alert enough to bite and is painful.

5 Muzzle A temporary muzzle can be used with a rope or thin cloth around the nose and tied under the ears and around the back of the head A temporary muzzle can be used with a rope or thin cloth around the nose and tied under the ears and around the back of the head

6 Do Not Muzzle If: Pet is Vomiting Pet is Vomiting Difficulty Breathing Difficulty Breathing Seizures Seizures Do not leave muzzled dog unattended Do not leave muzzled dog unattended

7 Getting the Vitals Temperature: Temperature: Pulse: bpm Pulse: bpm Respiration: breaths/min. Respiration: breaths/min. Capillary refill: less than 3 sec. Capillary refill: less than 3 sec. Blanch lip or gum and Count time for color to return

8 Choking Signs Anxiousness Anxiousness Pawing at face Pawing at face Head thrust down Head thrust down and forward and forward Excessive salivation Excessive salivation Stridor (harsh Stridor (harsh breathing sound) breathing sound)

9 Choking Management CAN Cough and Gag: CAN Cough and Gag: 1. Confine and monitor pet CANNOT Cough, Gag, CANNOT Cough, Gag, or has Stridor: or has Stridor: 1. Chest Thrusts until object comes up or patient goes down 2. If Patient is unconscious, begin CPR

10 ABC’s of CPR A= Airway A= Airway Check the mouth/throat Check the mouth/throat B= Breathing B= Breathing Watch the chest Watch the chest C= Circulation C= Circulation Check for a pulse Check for a pulse Call for help! Call for help!

11 Airway Check to see if the dog is unconscious Check to see if the dog is unconscious Clear the mouth and throat Clear the mouth and throat Use your fingers to sweep the mouth Use your fingers to sweep the mouth Rinse out with water if possible Rinse out with water if possible But keep the mouth pointed downward But keep the mouth pointed downward Extend the neck to Extend the neck to open up the airway open up the airway

12 Breathing Check the chest for rise and fall. Check the chest for rise and fall. Feel for breath or air coming from the mouth. Feel for breath or air coming from the mouth. Normal breaths are 3-20 per minute Normal breaths are 3-20 per minute

13 Circulation Normal pulse rates are for large breed dogs. Normal pulse rates are for large breed dogs. Pulses are felt commonly Pulses are felt commonly 1.inside middle of the rear leg (femoral pulse), (femoral pulse), 2. or over the chest on the left side (5-7 th rib space at the level of the elbow)

14 Circulation=Compression Place patient on right side Place patient on right side Kneel behind the patient Kneel behind the patient Hands should be over the heart and behind the elbow Hands should be over the heart and behind the elbow Use 2 hands for Use 2 hands for compressions on large dogs, 1 hand on either side of the chest for puppies of the chest for puppies

15 Compression technique Compressions should be firm, fast and rhythmic Compressions should be firm, fast and rhythmic Allow for a full recoil of the chest Allow for a full recoil of the chest Press 1/3 to ½ chest width Press 1/3 to ½ chest width 100 compressions per minute 100 compressions per minute 30 compressions for every 2 breaths, then repeat 30 compressions for every 2 breaths, then repeat

16 Not Breathing ? 1.Pull the tongue forward past teeth 2.Cover the muzzle with your hands for an airtight seal your hands for an airtight seal 3.Blow Long slow strong breaths over into nostrils, 2 breaths, Approx. 2 seconds each

17 CPR cycle Repeat 30 Compressions and 2 breaths until breathing on their own Repeat 30 Compressions and 2 breaths until breathing on their own Check Pulse at femoral artery Check Pulse at femoral artery Maintain open airway Maintain open airway Get Help, take pet to nearest Animal Hospital Get Help, take pet to nearest Animal Hospital Review findings with the Veterinarian. Review findings with the Veterinarian.

18 Bleeding Elevate the wound Elevate the wound Apply direct hand pressure Apply direct hand pressure If still bleeding, apply constricting hand band above the injury site If still bleeding, apply constricting hand band above the injury site

19 Excessive Bleeding Apply bandage material heavily at the wound site Apply bandage material heavily at the wound site Transport immediately to a nearby Animal Hospital Transport immediately to a nearby Animal Hospital Impaled objects should Impaled objects should NOT be removed if possible NOT be removed if possible

20 Fractures Broken bones will Broken bones will cause swelling and pain at the site, and may be through the skin through the skin Restrain and muzzle first Restrain and muzzle first Cover open wounds with bandage/ towel Cover open wounds with bandage/ towel

21 Fractures Immobilize with straight firm objects…sticks, broom handles, plastic wrapped in the bandage material Immobilize with straight firm objects…sticks, broom handles, plastic wrapped in the bandage material Take immediately to Emergency Animal Hospital Take immediately to Emergency Animal Hospital

22 Poisons and Toxins Signs: vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, difficulty breathing, seizures Signs: vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, difficulty breathing, seizures Call Poison Control: Call Poison Control: Call local Animal Hospital and transport Call local Animal Hospital and transport 1. Bring suspected poison or toxin 2. Bring vomitus or stool Induce vomiting only if directed to do so Induce vomiting only if directed to do so 3% Hydrogen peroxide 1 tbs/15 lb

23 Insect Stings and Bites Pain, redness, local swelling, often on the face or paws Pain, redness, local swelling, often on the face or paws Keep pet comfortable. Remove the stinger if visible Keep pet comfortable. Remove the stinger if visible Use Diphenydramine (benedryl) Use Diphenydramine (benedryl) 25 mg / 25 lb of body weight every 8-12 hrs Liquids often easier to use with puppies

24 Spiders Black Widows Black Widows treat with antihistamines treat with antihistamines Brown Recluse Brown Recluse No antidote Treat as a wound

25 Snakes 1-2 punctures, 30% dry bites 1-2 punctures, 30% dry bites Severe pain localized with swelling or bruising Severe pain localized with swelling or bruising

26 Snakes Venomous snakes of Florida: Pygmy Rattler Pygmy Rattler Coral Snake Coral Snake (red touches yellow, scary fellow!!) Copperhead Copperhead

27 Snakebite Treatment Reduce level of activity Reduce level of activity Restrain, muzzle if needed Restrain, muzzle if needed Treat for shock Treat for shock Identify type of snake if possible Identify type of snake if possible Transport to nearest Emergency Animal Hospital Transport to nearest Emergency Animal Hospital Antivenin VERY EXPENSIVE and may not have in stock Antivenin VERY EXPENSIVE and may not have in stock

28 Heat Hyperthermia= Overheating Hyperthermia= Overheating Heatstroke= Body temp above 103 consistently Heatstroke= Body temp above 103 consistently Burns= localized, 1 st, 2 nd, 3 rd degree Burns= localized, 1 st, 2 nd, 3 rd degree

29 Hyperthermia Due to: Due to: 1. Confined space 2. No ventilation 3. No water 4. High humidity 5. Stress 6. Exercise extremes Short nosed breeds more susceptible

30 Hyperthermia Signs Panting, dogs cool themselves this way Panting, dogs cool themselves this way Foaming at mouth Foaming at mouth Rapid heart rate, bright red tongue, gums Rapid heart rate, bright red tongue, gums Vomiting Vomiting Lethargy, incoordination Lethargy, incoordination

31 Heatstroke Treatment Move to shade or air conditioning Move to shade or air conditioning Offer water to drink Offer water to drink Pour water over body Pour water over body Check temperature, stop cooling if temperature drops below 103 Check temperature, stop cooling if temperature drops below 103 Transport to Emergency Animal Hospital as soon as possible Transport to Emergency Animal Hospital as soon as possible

32 Cold Injuries Localized freezing: paws, ears Localized freezing: paws, ears Body temp. below 4 degrees F Body temp. below 4 degrees F Signs: Signs: 1. Uncontrollable shivering 2. Decreased heart and breathing rate 3. Lethargy and incoordination 4. Blue tongue and gums

33 Cold Injury Treatment Restrain and muzzle if needed Restrain and muzzle if needed DO NOT RUB affected areas DO NOT RUB affected areas Prepare to treat for Shock Prepare to treat for Shock Use warming pads/heating pads with caution…monitor temperature Use warming pads/heating pads with caution…monitor temperature Transport to nearby Animal Hospital Transport to nearby Animal Hospital

34 Thank You.


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