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Approaches for Teaching Metacognitive Strategies to Individuals and Groups Saundra Yancy McGuire, Ph.D. Retired Asst. Vice Chancellor & Professor of Chemistry.

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Presentation on theme: "Approaches for Teaching Metacognitive Strategies to Individuals and Groups Saundra Yancy McGuire, Ph.D. Retired Asst. Vice Chancellor & Professor of Chemistry."— Presentation transcript:

1 Approaches for Teaching Metacognitive Strategies to Individuals and Groups Saundra Yancy McGuire, Ph.D. Retired Asst. Vice Chancellor & Professor of Chemistry Director Emerita, Center for Academic Success Louisiana State University

2 QUESTIONS? 1. What questions do you have from this morning’s session? 2. What do you want to know more about?

3 Effective Metacognitive Strategies  Always ask why, how, and what if  Use SQ5R for reading assignments (survey, question, read, recite, review, wRite, reflect)  Test understanding by giving “mini lectures” on concepts  Always solve problems without looking at an example or the solution  Use the Study Cycle with Intense Study Sessions  Use the textbook!

4 Metacognitive Strategies Must Be a Part of Significant Learning Experiences

5 Dee Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning

6 Interactive Nature of Significant Learning

7 "Learning-How-to-Learn" Goals What would you like for students to learn about: - how to be good students in a course like this? - how to learn about this particular subject? - how to become a self-directed learner of this subject i.e., having a learning agenda of what they need/want to learn, and a plan for learning it?

8 Metacognitive Get Acquainted Activity* What do you believe is important to understand and learn in _____________________? What do you believe to be critical characteristics of successful students in ___________? How will you study and prepare for exams in ______________________________? *Simpson, M. & Rush, L. (2012) in Teaching Study Strategies in Developmental Education, Hodges, Simpson, Stahl eds. New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s

9  Historical Background on Study Strategies  Developmental Education and Learning Assistance Today  Diverse Populations in the Classroom  Students’ Beliefs about Study Strategies  Theory, Research, and Best Practices  Assessment and Evaluation Hodges, Simpson, Stahl eds. (2012) Teaching Study Strategies in Developmental Education, New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s

10 Gabriel, Kathleen F. (2008) Teaching Unprepared Students. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing Two More Valuable References Nilson, Linda. (2013) Creating Self-regulated Learners Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing

11 Effective Strategies for Teaching Unprepared Students*  Establish High Expectations  Emphasize Consistent Contact  Interweave Assessment and Teaching  Define Student Success  Clarify Student Responsibility  Establish a Learning Community of Scholars  Meet Students Where They Are  Help Students Determine Their Learning Style *Gabriel, Kathleen F. (2008) Teaching Unprepared Students. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing

12 Dweck, Carol, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. New York: Random House Publishing Help Students Develop the Right Mindset Shenk, David, The Genius in All of Us: Why Everything You've Been Told About Genetics, Talent, and IQ Is Wrong. New York: Doubleday

13 Mindset* is Important!  Fixed Intelligence Mindset Intelligence is static You have a certain amount of it  Growth Intelligence Mindset Intelligence can be developed You can grow it with actions Dweck, Carol (2006) Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. New York: Random House Publishing

14 Responses to Many Situations are Based on Mindset Fixed Intelligence Mindset Response Growth Intelligence Mindset Response ChallengesAvoidEmbrace ObstaclesGive up easilyPersist Tasks requiring effortFruitless to TryPath to mastery CriticismIgnore itLearn from it Success of OthersThreateningInspirational

15 Are Learning Styles a Myth?

16 Or Can Learning Styles Help Students Learn? Date: Fri, Oct 19, 2012 at 4:35 PM Greg, Good news, I redeemed myself from my first physics exam bomb with a 99% on the exam I took the day after we spoke. I have been reading on the LSU site you gave me and I really like it. I took their right brain or left brain quiz designed to suggest what learning style best suits you and I landed 50/50 for right-left brain dominance, so that left me with a lot of suggestions... I've also made myself a new weekly schedule with 1 hour study blocks of all of my subjects in one day… Cutting out the cell phone and recreational internet during study time is something else I really like. Just wanted to give you an update and thank you again for the meeting. Best, Reg ************************************ Gregory S. Owens Associate Dean, College of Science 315 S E. University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT ************************************

17 Where There is Agreement Faculty should use a wide variety of teaching methods, activities, and assessment techniques that will appeal to different types of learners

18 Learning Style/Preference VISUAL AURAL READ/WRITEKINESTHETIC

19 Reading/Writing Your prefer to learn by reading and taking notes. Read all assignments. Focus on headings and subheadings to help you find the author's organization of information. You might find it useful to reread and rewrite words and notes. Use flashcards, lists, and charts to study. Aural You prefer to learn and process material by listening. Participation in study groups and class discussions provide one of the very best ways to learn from what you hear and say. You might think that you should tape your lectures, but that won't help you separate and organize important lecture ideas. Instead, try converting written lecture notes to audio tapes. Read your notes aloud into a tape recorder, leaving brief amounts of time between main ideas and questions. This gives you time to think and then process out-loud. Kinesthetic You prefer to learn by direct experience or by moving. When you learn from direct experience, you learn by touch or by physical movement. The more you do, the more you learn. Highlighting, underlining, labeling information, and writing add movement to learning. Mapping, creating or using 3-D models if possible, charting, or creating other graphics or interactive tools also are ways to learn by doing. Role-plays, and experiments also help you learn actively. Participation in study groups or tutoring others provides additional ways to become an active learner. Visual Visual learners prefer concept mapping, flash charts, visual outlines and graphics. Adding meaningful symbols, colors, and graphics to notes also provide visual cues. Try to visualize how information appears on a page. In study groups or discussions, clarify what is said through either an image or drawing out a map. 2.) Sensory Preference (Modality)

20 Using Cognitive Science Information to Improve Student Performance Scenario Analysis Learning Strategies Handout Discussion of plans to teach students metacognitive learning strategies


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