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Loyola Marymount University EDES 6103: Curriculum and Instructional Leadership Fall 2014 Professor Lauren Casella September 18 th, 2014 The Curriculum.

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Presentation on theme: "Loyola Marymount University EDES 6103: Curriculum and Instructional Leadership Fall 2014 Professor Lauren Casella September 18 th, 2014 The Curriculum."— Presentation transcript:

1 Loyola Marymount University EDES 6103: Curriculum and Instructional Leadership Fall 2014 Professor Lauren Casella September 18 th, 2014 The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

2 Agenda :30 – 4:45Theorists Letter Chat 4:45 – 5:15Dewey 5:15 – 5:45Counts 5:45Break 6:00Tyler 6:30Bruner: MACOS The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

3 Homework due Compose rough draft of theorists letter Bring to class in some form Final draft due October 3 rd – in hard copy form Read Ch 1 Essential Questions Create 3 overarching essential questions for any subject area Complete and post Essential Question #2 The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

4 Essential Question #2 How does curriculum theory, design, and implementation shape an individuals school experience? How did the presented curriculum and instruction engage me or disengage me as a learner during elementary and secondary school? What am I good at, passionate about and why? What am I weak in and why? 1.JSEA Profile of a Graduate 2.Dewey 3.Counts 4.Urban Prep Academy 5.Tyler 6.Bruner The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

5 A1: What is Education: I believe that the individual who is to be educated is a social individual, and the society is an organic union of individuals. A2: What the School Is: I believe that the school is primarily a social institution. Education is living. Deepen the connections to home. A3: The Subject matter of Education: education is life, not a series of specifics. Education is discovery, a journey A4: The Nature of Method: focus on interest of child wherein lies the power A5: The School and Social Progress: education method of social progress and reform – moral. The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012 Dewey My Pedagogic Creed (1929)

6 Dewey Discussion Apply this to a school setting – a teaching and learning situation. What would this belief look like in school? i.e. a specific lesson or project, a field trip, a way to design curriculum, etc. The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

7 Dewey My Pedagogic Creed (1929) True education comes through the stimulation of the child’s powers by the demands of the social situations in which he finds himself Education must be linked to social life today School is apart of community life Use student interests as a spring board to reach learning goals Lab School – tackle current and relevant social issues Social reform

8 University of Chicago Laboratory School allery/program_of_studies1415with_cov.pdf

9 Insider Perspective: Michael Veitch former Admissions Director and University of Chicago Lab School What you see in a Lab classroom (especially N3 through 3rd grade) is lots of noisy activity and movement (tables and stations/no desks): kids "working on their stuff" -- projects often chosen by the kids themselves for investigation (see below for one classic example). It's just that Lab has been doing it for about 100 years, while other folks still had their desks bolted down in rows until relatively recently. Lab tends to do a lot of "looping" whereby a class and teacher stay together K-->1 or 2-->3, allowing for ideas and projects -- and core concepts snuck in there as well -- to be revisited and built upon. And there it really paid dividends. We should have done more…

10 Real World Example a 3rd Grade teacher (looping), having heard plenty of griping about the taste of the milk in the lunchroom in 2nd Grade, put her group "on watch" for the same problem to spring up in the new year. It did -- and so she challenged the kids to solve the problem. You can imagine the skills involved in this process: polling and percentages, scientific lab-bio-analysis (as in "what makes this milk taste bad?"), investigation of the production line and challenges like transportation/delivery/refrigeration, corporate letter-writing (as in inviting in some competition), and community service: a commitment to making life better for everyone in the lower school! It turned into a Lower School campus-wide cause and effort, with the outcome being a change of milk-providing companies and a real sense of empowerment and do-good satisfaction amongst that bunch of 3rd-graders.

11 Why it works at Lab from Michael Veitch, former Admissions Director Because they've been doing it forever and the average Lower School teacher is about 55 and has been there for, oh, years; and, It's probably the most pronounced assemblage of REALLY bright kids you'll find anywhere on the planet (proof that good genes do mean something in the academic world, I guess).

12 Challenges at Lab Still, high school teachers complain that LS and MS have neglected to teach them both grammar and any sort of historical timeline. I remember a story about a very bright freshman who was convinced that WWI preceded the Civil War -- (of course: that's why it's called WORLD WAR #1, man!)

13 More Lab anecdotes It's a very special place whose specialness may have today more to do with its unique population (about 60% of the kids are the children of highly educated UC faculty/and another 30% are affiliated in other ways with the U) than with Dewey's philosophy of education. There are those who say that the true "Deweyian Spirit" (along with his sculpted bust from the early 1900's) has migrated north to Francis Parker -- interesting, too, to note that the bust of Francis Parker resides in the lobby of Blaine Hall at Lab.

14 George S. Counts Dare the School Build a New Social Order (1932) Each student is assigned a paragraph. Reread the paragraph and create a word or phrase that explains/summarizes the paragraph. Create an image, drawing, slogan that will visually summarize his ideas (think of the Sir Ken Robinson dry erase board images) The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

15 George S. Counts Dare the School Build a New Social Order (1932) More humane and democratic society Resistive to “child-centered” – don’t ignore the social context of education and the business dominated atmosphere Social regeneration – activists-oriented social studies curriculum Dewey thought Count’s “imposition” seems hard to distinguish from indoctriniation.

16 Part 2 – Traditionalists Middle of 20 th Century (1950 – 1960s) Lacking academic rigor – provide gifted programs Feds give $$ Launch of Sputnik (1957) Focus on Curriculum design Curriculum development, implementation, evaluation, standards TylerBrunerPopham Eisner

17 Tyler (1949) Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction What Educational Purposes should the School Seek to Attain? 1.Study of learners (social and psychological needs) 2.Study of contemporary life to identify “critical knowledge” 3.Subject matter specialists What main functions does the subject develop for students? How does the subject contribute to others functions? The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

18 Using Tyler’s work as a reference – answer this question: How does curriculum theory, design, and implementation shape an individuals school experience? How did the presented curriculum and instruction engage me or disengage me as a learner during elementary and secondary school? What am I good at, passionate about and why? What am I weak in and why? The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

19 Man: A Course of Study (MACOS) 1970’s 5 th grade year long social studies curriculum Study of Inuit Indians in Canada through film 0:00 – 9:00 intro and contextual setting 15:00 – 19:40video clips from the curriculum 48:00 – 52:00closing and aftermath The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

20 Popham Readings number off A - G A.Measure and Clarity B.All, or Nothing at All? C.Selected and Constructed Learner Responses D.Content Generality E.Proficiency Levels F.The Taxonomies of Educational Objectives (Cognitive Domain, Affective Domain, Psychomotor Domain) G.Constructing Versus Selecting Objectives The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

21 Tyler and Bruner Both readings bring up educational purpose Now the debate is not whether specific learning goals should be used – but how they should be used, the form they should take – and the functions they serve The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012

22 Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education https://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_build_a_school_i n_the_cloud#t What does Mitra suggest and imply about students and learning? How does his belief “agree or disagree” with our/your methods of schooling? Do flaws do you find in his thinking? What is a challenge about this form of education?

23 Standard vs. Objective A) Solve problems involving scale drawings of geometric figures, including computing actual lengths and areas from a scale drawing and reproducing a scale drawing at a different scale. B) Students will compute lengths and areas of a classroom to create a blueprint of the classroom indicating the scale used. When finished, students will write a "sales pitch" to a person explaining why their blueprint is accurate and should be purchased. The Curriculum Studies Reader, 4th ed. by Flinders and Thornton. RoutledgeFlamer: 2012


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