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Reduction of Environmental Impacts by Development of Industrial Symbiosis in Japan - Case Studies for Application of Co-production Technologies in Steel.

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Presentation on theme: "Reduction of Environmental Impacts by Development of Industrial Symbiosis in Japan - Case Studies for Application of Co-production Technologies in Steel."— Presentation transcript:

1 Reduction of Environmental Impacts by Development of Industrial Symbiosis in Japan - Case Studies for Application of Co-production Technologies in Steel Industries and its Reduction Potential of Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Yasunari Matsuno, Ichiro Daigo, Masaru Yamashita and Yoshihiro Adachi Department of Material Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo

2 Topics _ Introduction – Backgrounds of this study _ What is “Co-production” technology _ Application of Co-production technologies in Steel industry –Low-temperature Gasification Plant –CO 2 Recovery and Utilization System _ Results of the case studies _ Conclusion

3 To maximize energy, resource, environmental efficiency Recycle-oriented Society Kyoto Protocol (Reduction of GHGs) Industrial symbiosis Individually optimization Industry A Industry B Industry C Energy, Resources Industry A Industry B Industry C Energy, Resources

4 Example of “Industrial symbiosis” Jurong Island, Singapore To develop Jurong Island into a World-Class Chemicals Hub in the Asia Pacific Region Oil coal Natural gas Low grade oil Fuel Oil Steel, Cement Recycle Hub ゙ ( value chain cluster ) Environment Final wastes CO2, Exhaust heat Products Wastes Power, gas Recycled materials H2, Syngas High press. Steam Elec. Power Fuels IGCC Power Plant consumer Final wastes Environment consumer Chemicals Medicine

5 Locations of key industries Steel works Refineries – Petroleum industry Ethylene plants – Petrochemical industry LNG tanks Potentials to develop industrial symbiosis

6 Fuels , Energy Raw materials Power Generation Manufacturing Pro. Fuels , Energy Raw materials Wastes Power Generation Manufacturing Pro. Main products ・ Goods ・ Electricity ・ Materials Large amount of waste heat (1) Existing System (2) Co-production System Main products ・ Goods ・ Electricity ・ Materials Little waste heat Co-products ・ Fuels ・ Chemicals ・ Steam etc. Newly Energy Saving Process What is co-production technology? - Technologies for Industrial symbiosis

7 Industry A Industry B Industry C Energy, Resources Energy, Resources Industry A Industry B Industry C

8 Goal and scope ・ To expand system boundary to evaluate total environmental impacts ・ To investigate environmental impacts of Co-production technologies (for Industrial symbiosis) Gasification plant Dry ice (cryogenic energy ) production plant with CHP Steel works

9 Methodology ・ Industries (capacity, location) ・ Waste heat distribution ・ Demand and supply of products, energy 2 . To conduct LCA for co-production technologies - CO 2 emissions- 1 . To investigate where to apply co-production technologies 3 . To optimize the transport of products by Linear Planning method 4 . To investigate total environmental impacts

10 Co-production technology Current technology 1st Step To assess the reduction potential of environmental impacts by co-production technology. To compare with current technology. 2nd Step To assess the reduction potential of environmental impacts in a industrial cluster scale. To investigate the demand and supply of energy and products. To develop a model 3rd Step To assess the reduction potential of environmental impacts in a regional (country) scale. To develop database. To integrate with other tools. Power stations Fuel gas Steel plant with co-production process Electricity Demand and Supply Grid mix Conventional process Demand and Supply

11 Where to apply co-production technologies? - Waste heat distribution in industries in Japan Waste heat amount Waste heat distribution Apply Co-production technology to Steel industry Electricity Steel Chemical Waste incin. 9% Paper pulp Others Ceramic

12 Waste heat distribution in steel works Exhaust gas from Coke oven, BFG etc COG LDG etc Water Solid Gas

13 Co-production technology (1) High-temperature Waste heat High efficiency gasification plant with high-temperature waste heat (600 ℃ ) Tar 1t Waste heat at 873 K 1300 Mcal Gasification plant Gas Steam CO/H 2 = Mcal Methanol 5810 Mcal Electricity or Methanol: easy for storage, Utilizing waste heat

14 ICFG : Internally Circulating Fluidized-bed Gasifier Synthesis GasCombustion Gas Gasification Chamber Char-Combustion Chamber Fluidizing medium descending zone Heat Recovery Chamber Fluidizing medium & Pyrolysis Residue (Char, Tar) Heat Transfer Tubes SteamAir Feedstock (Fuel or Wastes)

15 Co-production technology (2) Low temperature waste heat Dry Ice (cryogenic energy ) production with CHP (Utilizing waste heat) Exhaust gas recovery Waste heat at at 423 K 305kcal Electricity: kWh Dry ice production process CHP DI 1kg

16 Cooling Tower Chemical Heat Pump Flash tank Compressor CO2 gas from co-production processes Liquefied CO2 tank High-stage expander Dry-Ice press Dry-Ice Gas CoolerLiquefierSub-cooler Low-stage expander Co-production technology (2)

17 LCA for Co-production technologies Fig. CO2 emission intensity for co-products (kg-CO2/kg)

18 Location of steel works in Japan

19 Location of methanol consumer in Japan

20 Location of steel works and methanol consumer in Japan

21 Total CO2 emissions - Core technology Fig. CO2 emission intensity of methanol

22 Total CO2 emission reduction potential in Japan CO2 emission reduction potential by co-production technologies: Methanol: 0.34 ton-CO2/ton-methanol Dry ice: 0.13 ton-CO2/ton-dry ice Current demand in Japan: Methanol: 1.8 million ton/y, Dry ice: 0.24 million ton/y Total CO2 emission reduction potential in Japan: Methanol: 0.6 million ton/y Dry ice: 0.03 million ton/y

23 Other possible application of dry ice Low temperature crushing of PP pellet PP pellet (3mm diameter) Microscope of crushed pp pellet (200μm/div)

24 Low temperature crushing of PP - Conventional technology Low temperature crushing of PP - by dry ice PP pellet : 1 kg Liquefied N2 : 9.68 kg Crushed PP : 1 kg PP pellet : 1 kg Dry ice : 3 kg Crushed PP : 1 kg CO2 emissions : 2.33 kg-CO2 CO2 emissions : 0.23 kg-CO2 Δ2.10 kg-CO2 Potential demand of crushed PP: million ton/y (0.64% of total PP) CO2 reduction potential: million ton-CO2

25 Conclusion Methanol production by co-production technology (gasification plant) will reduce CO2 emissions by 91% compared with conventional technology (92% reduction in production, 90% reduction in transport) Total CO2 emission reduction potential in Japan by methanol production : 0.6 million ton-CO2 Dry Ice (cryogenic energy) production by co-production technology will also reduce CO2 emissions by 64% compared with conventional technology. Total CO2 emission reduction potential in Japan is 0.03 million ton-CO2. Other CO2 reduction potential by applying dry ice is being investigated, such as low temperature crushing of PP pellet

26 _ Thank you very much for your attention. _ For further information;


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