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Today became GREAT when YOU arrived!. SHHHHH/SHARE….1. Pick an activity 2. Write or think quietly 3. Be ready to share when time is called. Explain to.

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Presentation on theme: "Today became GREAT when YOU arrived!. SHHHHH/SHARE….1. Pick an activity 2. Write or think quietly 3. Be ready to share when time is called. Explain to."— Presentation transcript:

1 Today became GREAT when YOU arrived!

2 SHHHHH/SHARE….1. Pick an activity 2. Write or think quietly 3. Be ready to share when time is called. Explain to a new student teacher what differentiation is in terms of what he/she would be doing in the classroom – and why. The definition should help the new student teacher develop an image of differentiation in action. Write a definition of differentiation you feel clarifies its key intent, elements and principles. Develop a metaphor, analogy, or visual symbol that you think represents and clarifies what’s important to understand about differentiation. From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

3 TARGET I can explain the key elements of differentiated instruction.

4 Jacque Melin GVSU

5 Community Curriculum Assessment Essential KUDs (Targets) Engagement Teaching up Teacher/Student Connections Safe Environment Shared Partnership Pre-Assessments Formative (on-going) Assessments to inform instruction 3-P Grading Instruction Addressing Readiness, Interests, Learning Profiles Multiple strategies Flexible management From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

6 Common Sense Differentiation Create a learning environment that supports the hard work of learning. Be clear about the learning destination (TARGETS) Know where students are in relation to the destination (FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS) Adjust teaching to make sure that students arrive at the destination (and move beyond it) (DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCITON) CURRICULUM ASSESSMENT INSTRUCTION COMMUNITY From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

7 Differentiation is NOT a set of strategies…. It’s a way of thinking about teaching and learning Strategies are TOOLS to accomplish the goals of DI. They are no more differentiation than a hammer and saw are the house they help to build. From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

8 #1 QUALITY DI Paving the way to learning Mindset Connections Community Quality DI Begins with a growth mindset, moves to student-teacher connections, & evolves to community. From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

9 The Predictive power of mindset Fixed –Success comes from being smart –Genetics, environment determine what we can do –Some students are smart – some aren’t –Teachers cannot override students’ learning profiles. Growth –Success comes from effort –With hard work, most students can do most things –Teachers can override students’ learning profiles –A key role of the teacher is to set high goals, provide high support, ensure student focus – to find the things that makes school work for a student. –C. Tomlinson, August 2010 Wildly Exciting Education

10 Challenges Avoid challenges Obstacles Give up easily Effort See effort as fruitless or worse Criticism Ignore useful negative feedback Success of Others Feel threatened by the success of others As a result, they may plateau early and achieve less than their full potential. Challenges Embrace challenges Obstacles Persist in the face of setbacks Effort See effort as a path to mastery Criticism Learn from criticism Success of Others Find lessons and inspiration in the success of others As a result, they reach ever higher levels of achievement. Fixed Mindset Growth Mindset Carol Dweck, Ph.D

11 A Visual Analogy for your consideration

12 Katie Couric interview with Captain Sully Sullenberger Captain Sully Sullenberger –What do you find to be the most compelling thing he has to say? Why does it strike you as the most important? –What does any of this have to do with teaching?

13 What kind of pilot are you?

14 Teacher Mindset Mindset WHO Shapes Student Self- perception WHERE Builds or Erodes Group Trust WHAT I teach what I believe you can learn HOW Coverage vs Whatever it takes How does teacher Mindset impact who, where, what, & how we teach? What are the implications of mindset for differentiation? C. Tomlinson, August 2010

15 Teacher/Student Connection It is WHO we teach not WHAT we teach!

16 Remembering Names On the First Day of School Why is remembering names on the first day important? No matter what, you will eventually learn all of your student’s names, so why not engage in an activity the first day learning your students names? Numerous techniques and strategies

17 Why? 1. Builds community: –Name = badge of individuality (James B. Duke, the cigarette king, offered to give Trinity College in Durham, North Carolina, forty million dollars if the college would change its name to Duke University) –Learn names = shows you care –Students enjoy learning their peers’ names 2. Administrative issues: –Helps with: Roll call Knowing health issues Back to school night or shadow a student day When the office calls for a student Students with the same name or nick names When parents come to meet you Special needs i.e., Resource, IEPs, etc… 3. Assessment: Assess student’s work with a picture of them in your head

18 How do you learn your student’s names? First Step in Succeeding in memorizing names... CARE and WILLPOWER Tips: 1. Impression 2. Repetition 3. Association

19 Impression 1.) Hear the person’s name distinctly –Listen: Concentrate on the person’s name –If you didn’t get their name, ask them to repeat it –If the name is difficult, ask the person if you can write it down: The Chinese say “One time seeing is worth a thousand times hearing” 2.) Get a clear impression of the person

20 Repetition Use the name over and over

21 Association Strongest bond - use your schemata - build on what you already know - make connections 1. Similar Name: Do you know some one else with this name? 2. Rhyme: Sillier the better 3. Appearance: Can you make a connection with their profession or physical characteristics? i.e. Tom Baldwin has very little hair 4. Meaning: Does the name have a famous connection or associate with daily life routines? i.e Bill Fisher- picture Bill fishing. 5. Mind picture: Break your name apart into syllables and tell a story to help people remember.

22 Think –Pair – Share Activity: In pairs, think of a way to use the 5 steps in association to help us memorize your name. Then choose one of the associations to share with the class. You have 5 minutes. You will share YOUR name with the class. Through repetition, we will memorize everyone’s name.

23 #2 QUALITY DI Paving the way to learning Is Rooted in Meaningful Curriculum

24 #3 QUALITY DI Paving the way to learning Is guided by on-going assessment for planning and feedback (not grades)

25 Alphabet Graffiti ( formative)

26 #4 QUALITY DI Paving the way to learning Addresses student readiness, interest and learning profile.

27 Steps to Create a Choice Lesson Differentiated by Learning Preference, Interest or Readiness 1.Identify the subject and topic of study (unit). 2.Use curriculum documents to determine what you want the students to know, understand and be able to do (TARGETS). 3.Decide on an activity structure that will allow students to choose a task that interests them (e.g., choice boards, RAFT, cubing or thinkdot activity, learning contract, WebQuest, etc.) 4.Brainstorm a variety of tasks based on what you know about the learning preferences of your students. 5.Eliminate tasks that will not lead the students to TARGETS. 6.Choose the activities that will be the most engaging for your students and best match their learning preferences. 7.Check to see that all students will reach the same TARGETS, no matter which task(s) they complete. 8.Describe the learning activities in detail. Create student handouts, if appropriate. 9.Determine how student work will be assessed. 10.Decide how you will facilitate sharing and bring closure to the lesson.

28 Don’t Bother Differentiating FLUFF If you are going to spend time planning to differentiate by interest, learning profile, or readiness, be sure to use key understanding!!!

29 SHHHHH/SHARE….1. Pick an activity 2. Write or think quietly 3. Be ready to share when time is called. Explain to a new student teacher what differentiation is in terms of what he/she would be doing in the classroom – and why. The definition should help the new student teacher develop an image of differentiation in action. Write a definition of differentiation you feel clarifies its key intent, elements and principles. Develop a metaphor, analogy, or visual symbol that you think represents and clarifies what’s important to understand about differentiation. From C. Tomlinson, Wildly Exciting Education 2010

30 Linear – Schoolhouse Smart - Sequential ANALYTICAL Thinking About the Sternberg Intelligences Show the parts of _________ and how they work. Explain why _______ works the way it does. Diagram how __________ affects __________________. Identify the key parts of _____________________. Present a step-by-step approach to _________________. Streetsmart – Contextual – Focus on Use PRACTICAL Demonstrate how someone uses ________ in their life or work. Show how we could apply _____ to solve this real life problem ____. Based on your own experience, explain how _____ can be used. Here’s a problem at school, ________. Using your knowledge of ______________, develop a plan to address the problem. CREATIVEInnovator – Outside the Box – What If - Improver Find a new way to show _____________. Use unusual materials to explain ________________. Use humor to show ____________________. Explain (show) a new and better way to ____________. Make connections between _____ and _____ to help us understand ____________. Become a ____ and use your “new” perspectives to help us think about ____________.

31 Art and Color: Choice Board (Triarchic Intelligences) Target: I can analyze the use of color in painting.

32 Analytical After you have looked at Monet’s Paintings 6.24 and 6.25 in your book. Select one painting and write a paragraph describing and analyzing it’s tone. Tone is associated with the feeling that Monet has about the scene, how he conveys the feeling to the viewer, and how he encourages the viewer to respond with emotions to the scene, First make a list of adjectives for the colors and forms in the painting. Then begin a paragraph using your list of words and make specific references to the painting. Practical Make a painting or a collage that focuses on major events in your life. Use color to indicate the emotional connection you have with the specific event. Creative Poets use color in their poetry, sometimes to describe objects but also as metaphors of feelings, moods, or scenes. Look in Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations for literary references to each color. You will find under red, a reference to Percy Bysshe Shelley’s “Ode to the West Wind.” Find a copy of the poem and locate his description of autumn leaves. Write your own color metaphors.

33 Physical Education: Choice Board (Triarchic Intelligences) TARGET: I can communicate, cooperate, be a member of a team and enjoy participating in physical activity.

34 Analytical Analyze the task you have ahead of you. What will you need to succeed? What obstacles are you likely to encounter? What is the best way to go about this task so that everyone participates/everyone exploits his or her strengths/you meet the lesson goals. Complete the task. Critique your performance – focus on team performance rather than individual. Compare this activity to other team endeavors. What this task a good way to learn about teamwork? Why or why not? Practical Perform this task in a way which takes the: least physical effort; moderate physical effort; highest level of physical effort; relies on each member equally; relies on each member’s special strengths; uses the least/most equipment, expenses, etc. Discuss: When might you need to use each approach? What are the +/- of each? How can this exercise help you in real life? Creative Complete the task to the best of your ability. Change the rules and try it again; repeat (make sure the task stays safe!). Design another such task that encourages cooperation and communication in a different way – perhaps nonverbal communication. What if you didn’t have the equipment you were given? How could you accomplish the task? What equipment is necessary? Nice to have? Unnecessary?

35 Food Pyramid: Choice Board (Triarchic Intelligences) TARGET: I can explain the changes in the food pyramid.

36 Analytical Analyze the 2 pyramids to discover which change is the most significant as measured by the changes in caloric consumption at that level. Provide a breakdown of how you arrived at your decision and illustrate your finding with examples of representative food items that illustrate the shift in the balance. Practical Using the old version of the pyramid, devise the ideal diet for a 17 year old girl of a certain height; then, revise this diet to reflect the principles set forth by the new pyramid. Provide notes you would use as you explain to this “client” exactly how her “recommended” diet has changed and why. Creative Think of another way to proportionally illustrate the principles set forth by the food pyramid. Illustrate an “old” and “new” version of your metaphor, making sure to adhere to the proportions set forth by each version of the pyramid. For each metaphor version, include representative examples of food choices.

37 French-speaking Cultures: Choice Board (Triarchic Intelligences) TARGET: I can compare French- speaking cultures with U.S. cultures.

38 French Culture - Creative Task You work for the local county museum in your town. The museum director is a friend of the family and knows of your interest in francophone cultures. She asks you and your friends to design a temporary museum exhibit for an upcoming show designed to interest local high school students in other cultures. She particularly wants students to come away from the exhibit with an understanding of both the similarities and differences between typical leisure time activities of young people from our local region and at least two French-speaking cultures. Once you complete your research, design a museum quality display about each country that clearly points out similarities and differences between these cultures. Attach a brief written explanation, in English, to be posted alongside the exhibit that delineates your overall findings about similarities and differences between the cultures and encourages viewers to investigate the cultures further.

39 French Culture - Practical Task You are a student intern at a travel agency in your town. The boss has asked you and your friends to research at least two French speaking cultures and compare them to local U.S. culture with respect to the activities young people typically engage in. Your results will be presented to a group of local teachers who are considering working with your agency to set up a summer study program in a variety of francophone cultures. These teachers wish to know what their students might expect in terms of leisure time activities in the various countries, so that they can make informed decisions about which countries to target. Once you complete your research, design an informational brochure, poster, or series of PowerPoint slides about each country that clearly points out similarities and differences between these cultures. Attach a brief editorial for publication in the group’s monthly newsletter in which you summarize your overall findings about similarities and differences between the cultures and make recommendations for further study.

40 French Culture - Analytic Task You work as a student consultant for a Think Tank in your town. Your work group has been assigned to a committee on creating cultural links among young people of a variety of cultural and regional backgrounds. Because your group members are studying French, you are given the task of analyzing at least two French speaking cultures and comparing them to local U.S. culture with respect to the activities young people typically engage in. Your work will be used as a pilot for a larger comparative analysis to be completed by the larger committee. After completing your research, design a flow chart, Venn diagram, or other graphic organizer that clearly depicts the results of your analysis. The organizer may be done on the computer, if you wish. Attach a brief outline in English based on your overall findings, which clearly delineates your recommendations to the committee.

41 Spanish: Tic-Tac-Toe Board (Multiple Intelligences) TARGET: I can ?????

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43 : Tic-Tac-Toe Board (Multiple Intelligences) Target: I can explain color and/or color theory.

44 Poem or rap Write a poem or rap about color theory. Research the symbolic meanings people have given to various colors. What cultural factors, if any, influence these different meanings? Ask your English teacher how poets and writers use color in different ways and make up a poem or rap to present to the class. (Musical/ Rhythmic) Computer Color Wheel Use the brush, pencil, and/or shape tools to design a manufactured imaginary, or natural shape. This shape will be used to create a unique color wheel; therefore, the size should be somewhat small so that 12 copies of this shape can be used on a full page. When a satisfactory shape has been made, use the LASSO SELECTION tool to tightly select the object. Then choose the copy command from the edit menu to make a duplicate on the clip board. Use the paste command to successively copy 12 editions of the shape. These shapes should be arranged without overlapping to form a continuous, but not necessarily a circular, design. Experiment with flipping and reversing some of the shapes. After achieving an interesting arrangement, assign each shape the appropriate primary, secondary, and intermediate colors by using the fill tool. this to Mrs. Bosco (intrapersonal) Magazine Color Study Choose a hue, then look through magazines and cut out examples of all the variations of that hue you can find. Classify the colors into 5 groups: (1) pure hue, (2) dull tint, (3) dull shade, (4) bright tint, (5) bright shade. Glue examples to a small sheet of white paper and label each group. (Bodily/ Kinesthetic) Chart Go outside and find a leaf that has a value of color. You will be starting to look at that leaf with 100% color. From there you will pick out all the colors that you see. Write each color down and give it a % of how much of the leaf it covers. After you have all of your percents you will divide your square piece of matteboard up by the percents. You will then color match and fill in each area with the matched color. Finally glue the leaf on the board in an interesting manner. (Logical/ mathematical) Free Choice Color Must be approved by Mrs. Bosco Monet’s feeling Study Monet’s paintings in figures 6.24 and 6.25 in the book, select one painting and write a paragraph describing and analyzing its tone. Keep in mind that tone is associated with the feeling Monet has about the scene, how he conveys feeling to the view, and how he encourages the viewer to respond with emotions to the scene. First make a list of adjectives for the colors and the forms in the painting. Then begin a paragraph using your lists of words making specific references to the painting. (Verbal/ linguistic) Interview Interview the director of theatre arts to find out the way that color is used in stage lighting and scenery. In particular, find out more about transparent gels that are used to filter stage lighting and create various color effects. Write a proposal directed to the director of theatre, how you plan to create the lighting effects a play of your choice. (Interpersoanl) Nature Art Consider Andy Goldworthy and his nature art. Do some research on his work (thinking about space, color, and line). Go outside and create your own nature art. Take a photo of it and be prepared to discuss this with the class. (Naturalist) Poster You will be exploring how color is used in advertising, take notes. Choose a common everyday product such as toothpaste, cereal, or detergent. Identify the color used most often and discuss why it is used. Use a piece of poster board and advertize one of these products.. (Visual/ spatial)

45 Spanish Clothing Unit: Tic-Tac-Toe Board (Auditory, Visual, Kinesthetic) Target: I can use clothing vocabulary (in Spanish).

46 1. AUDITORY Listen to the song “La Lavadora” and write down as many clothing words that you hear. Then, write the English definition. _____ Write a minimum of 15 clothing words in Spanish. _____ Write all 15 of the words in English. 2. VERBAL/LINGUISTIC Write a commercial which advertizes at least 10 clothing items in Spanish. ______ Commercial format _____ Includes prices. _____ Advertises 10 clothing items. _____ Use props-pictures or actual clothing. _____ All words are in Spanish. 3. VISUAL Design a fashion ad with at least 10 clothing items represented. _____ Fashion ad format _____ Includes prices _____ Advertises 10 clothing items _____ Pictures of each item are in the ad _____ All words are in Spanish 4. NATURALIST Group clothing according to weather patterns in Spanish. Label in English and have one drawing per category. _____ There are at least 5 weather patterns _____ There are at least 4 clothing items per weather pattern. _____ Limit repeated items to 3 for the entire project. _____ One drawing per category. 5. LOGICAL Make a crossword puzzle with at least 20 vocabulary words in Spanish. _____ Use 20 clothing words in Spanish. _____ Has 1 clue per clothing item. _____ Includes a blank copy and a master copy (with the answers filled in). 6. INTERPERSONAL With a partner, write a dialogue and act it out in class. _____ Include at least 2 characters. _____ Use at least 10 clothing words in Spanish. _____ Use all Spanish words. _____ Both partners do equal work. _____ Act the dialogue out in front of a small group or the whole class. 7. INTRAPERSONAL Free choice. How do you learn vocabulary best? Fill out a proposal form and get it approved before beginning. _____ Includes clothing words in Spanish depending on the activity. ***Other requirements will be discussed once the proposal is made. 8. KINESTHETIC Make clothing out of various materials and label them in Spanish. ______ Uses physical material to make clothing. ______ Clothing is 3-D. ______ Makes clothing items depending on the material used. (See teacher). ______ Has labels in Spanish. 9.MUSCIAL Write a learning song for at least 10 to 15 of the clothing words in Spanish or Spanglish. Remember to challenge yourself!!! _____ Song format _____ Uses Spanish clothing words. _____Helps students learn the vocabulary. Please choose one from the green category, one from the red category and one from the yellow category. CLOTHING Assessment of _________________________________ Tic-Tac-Toe

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48 Physical Education: Tic-Tac-Toe Board (Multiple Intelligences) Target: I can think about how I do a drill and improve it.

49 Verbal/Linguistic Listen to or read directions for the drill; perform the drill; write or record a brief reflection of how you did on the skill and how you could improve. Interpersonal Talk with your partner to teach, encourage & debrief each drill; act as a coach while your partner does the drill. Intrapersonal Practice the drill, reflect on how it went and how it feels while you do each drill; How can you improve? What will you try next? Bodily/Kinesthetic Vary the amount of movement different parts of your body makes in each of the drills; how does this affect your performance on each skill? Your Choice Please have this approved by me. Musical/Rhythmic Pass to music – when music speed changes, change the speed of the drill; try to pass in a rhythmic pattern; count out loud: 1,2, 3 Kick! For example: does this help or hinder you? Why? Logical/Mathematical Figure out the parts that make up the whole skill; how can improving the parts affect the whole? Visual/Spatial Draw a diagram that shows how to do the skill; visualize yourself performing the skill, then do it; use your observation skills to help your partner improve. Naturalist How might you classify the skills in all of the drills? What is similar and what is different from drill to drill? How can this knowledge help you improve?

50 Key: A = advanced or complex activities written at the analysis, evaluation, or synthesis of Bloom’s Taxonomy. B = basic activities written at the application level.

51 Multiple Versions – “Prescribe” particular boards to particular students based on their current learning needs.

52 Remember – ALL students deserve challenging, engaging activities.

53 Spanish: Learning Menus Targets: I can explain Mexico’s Day of the Dead celebration.

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55 Pizza Builder Choice Board Orchestra Task: Build a ‘Pizza’ that represents a genre or style of music that is interesting to you

56 Pizza Builder!! Crust Choices: (Select one) Thin Crust: A solo work for an unaccompanied instrument or voice Hand Tossed Crust: A work for a chamber ensemble of 2-15 performers Deep Dish Crust: A work for large ensemble, over 16 performers Gluten Free Crust: A work for mechanical or computer based sound generators

57 Pizza Builder! Sauce Choices: (Select one) Red Sauce: represents music created for no specific occasion but simply as entertainment. White Sauce: represents uplifting music created for a specific purpose or cultural event. Pesto Sauce: represents somber music created for a specific purpose or cultural event. Barbeque Sauce: represents music created for a festive occasion or cultural event.

58 Pizza Builder! Toppings: (Select your favorite!) The Middle Ages: A delicious pizza topped with the sounds of singing Monks, recorders, shawms, and citterns. Note: peasants will be served on traditional wooden utensils; nobles will be served on gold plates. The Renaissance: A very festive pizza topped with the sounds of crumhorns, hurdy-gurdies, lutes, and essence of sackbut. Note: some toppings have been aged to preserve their potency.

59 Pizza Builder! Toppings – Con’t: (Select your favorite!) The Baroque: More refined than the Renaissance, this pizza includes the sounds of the viol family and the harpsichord. Depending on your sauce, you may detect a note of certain brass instruments. Note: This pizza served by a celebrity impersonator dressed as J. S. Bach The Classical: Very formal in design, this square pizza features the sounds of strings and woodwinds with percussion and occasional brass instruments. You must wear a powdered wig when ordering this pizza.

60 Pizza Builder! Toppings – Con’t: (Select your favorite!) The Romantic: A house favorite, this super-sized pizza features your traditional orchestral instrument family – but in twice the proportion. Earplugs recommended. The Modern: an unusual pizza, this pie pushes forms and shapes to an extreme. Order it with any combination of toppings. Note: crust will be asymmetrical. The Jazz: you may order the ‘big band’ or ‘combo’ version of this pizza. Each features excellent rhythm and improvised solos. Note: this pizza may not be available if the chef is between sets.

61 Pizza Builder! Bake and Deliver Your Pizza: You may use the media center as your information ‘Oven’. Use the media sources available to you to find a piece of music that represents the pizza you have created. You will be preparing your pizza for consumption by the class. When you ‘Serve’ your pizza, be prepared to play either an audio or video with audio clip of the music.

62 Pizza Builder! Assessment Rubric: Meets or exceeds expectations: –Crust, sauce, and toppings well thought out to produce a representative piece of music with an example that includes the ingredients. Pizza well baked and arrives hot! Some expectations met: –Crust, sauce, and toppings do not combine in a completely logical way – representative music difficult to categorize, and ingredients not well represented. Pizza may have been baked for too short a time. Expectations not met: –Pizza was missing a major ingredient, or was not baked sufficiently.

63 Show-And-Tell Boards All students have the same TASK, but have a choice of SHOW AND TELL. Top row – what they could show Bottom row – what they could tell Need 1 SHOW & 1 TELL

64 SHOW The actual musical score in manuscript or print – Note: you will be expected to explain the instrumentation and why it is unusual or significant. (solos only) A written timeline of significant cultural and musical events surrounding the piece of music you have selected. (Solos or duets only) Illustrations, photos, graphics or other written evidence explaining the historical significance or personal relevance of the music you have selected. (solos, duets, or trios) TELL You are a popular radio announcer. Construct a public service announcement advertising a performance of the piece of music you have selected. Create a desire for your listeners to attend. (solos only) You are a musician involved in a performance of the music you have selected. Create a speech or interview explaining the significance or relevance of the music you chose. (solos or duets only) You are the composer of the music being examined. Create a speech or interview explaining the significance or relevance of the music you chose. (solos, duets, or trios) Task: Describe a piece of music from AD 1200 to present in terms of its significance and/or personal relevance.

65 TARGET: I can write in a technical format. TASK: Write a set of directions for explaining how to use a Web 2.0 Tool. SHOWIllustrationsDiagram or Flow Chart How-to Brochure TELLUse topic headings and paragraphs Use detailed numbered or bulleted steps Write detailed sentences

66 Painting – Choosing a Subject: Multiple Intelligences : Choice Board TARGET: I can choose a subject to paint and explain my reasons for selecting this subject.

67 Arts:Painting Choice Board Verbal/LinguisticLogical/Mathematic & Visual/Spatial Prepare a flow chart that illustrates how you go about choosing a subject or setting for your painting. Musical/Rhythmic Make a soundscape (no words) that captures the same kind of feeling you wish your painting to capture. Intrapersonal Interpersonal & Bodily/Kinesthetic Naturalist Prepare an oral explanation to give to a classmate about why your subject is important enough to paint. Create a skit or pantomime that illustrates the right and the wrong way to go about choosing a subject for your work. Find a quiet space and write a me a letter telling how you go about deciding on a subject for your painting. Let me inside your head! Go outside to find inspiration for your painting. Sketch patterns, textures, moods, etc. in nature that you wish to introduce into your work. How did this experience influence the final product?

68 Foods: Cubes (novelty) TARGET: I can review information about food preparation.

69 Look at the food magazines provided. Choose a story about preparing or cooking a dish. Be ready to tell the class what you learned. Study the dessert recipes in the recipe box. Figure out how to adapt the recipe for twice as many serving. Now pretend you only have half that amount of flour the original recipe calls for. How will you adapt the recipe so it still turns out? What makes a meal “satisfying?” Come up with a list of dos and don’t. Why should we care. Using the materials provided, set the dinner table in an attractive yet functional manner. Be ready to explain your decisions. Experiment with various ways of mixing ingredients together (fold, whip, stir, etc.). Be ready to demonstrate these different ways to the class. Your own idea of something related to food preparation. Teacher approval required.

70 Read and write about Hunchback of Notre Dame. What symbols represented the beliefs held inside cathedrals – animals, gargoyles, flowers. Find out how cathedrals were engineered. How do space, light, acoustics, colors, relate to cathedrals. What is YOU cathedral? How do we measure ourselves vs. wholeness, bigness. Your own idea of something related to food preparation. Teacher approval required.

71 Ancient Civilizations: Cubing (Multiple Intelligences) Learning Goals: Students will – Know: The geographic, political, economic, religious, cultural, and social structures of an ancient civilization. Understand: Our understanding of why civilizations dominate or decline can be expanded by studying the people and events of ancient civilization. Do: I can create a product that demonstrates an understanding of aspects of ancient civilizations.

72 Describe the economy Describe some of the main cultural activities. Identify the location of the civilization and describe the connections between the geography and development of the civilization. Describe the social system. Describe the type of government or leadership that was present. Describe the traditions and beliefs. Roll the topic cube to determine the topic that will be explored. Roll the product cube to determine how understanding of the topic will be represented. Ancient Civilizations Topic Cube

73 Brochure Talk Show Chart or graphic organizer Advice Column Original song or rhyme adapted from a nursery rhyme Public Service Announcement Roll the topic cube to determine the topic that will be explored. Roll the product cube to determine how understanding of the topic will be represented. Ancient Civilizations Product Cube

74 Tobacco Prevention: RAFT TARGET: I can research information about tobacco prevention that has to do with enhancing health.

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77 RoleAudienceFormatTopic PaintbrushPeersCartoonThe World is full of Color. Emotional ColorsElementary Students Children’s Book Cover Weather. Warm or cool colors The PublicWarning AdWarning! Don’t………. Analogous Color Scheme Dole & GabbanaPaper People Wardrobe What to wear for the new fall design. Role – What is your role as the artist? Audience – Who will be looking at your art? Format – What is the best way to present your art? Topic – Who or what is the subject of the artwork? Directions: Choose a role. Consider the audience. Complete the assignment in your sketchbook using the format and topic for that role. You may use colored pencil for this project. Use the checklist on the next page to make sure you are doing your best work.

78 Spanish: RAFT TARGET: I can use Spanish words and sentences to tell where things are located in the classroom.

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80 Consumer Education Class RAFT In this RAFT, all students will have a Topic that focus on food safety practices. The Formats are meant to appeal to different learning styles. RoleAudienceFormatTopic Raw chicken pieces Chefs in trainingDramatic speechWhy foods like me (poultry) require special handling and care of utensils Cartoon characters Saturday morning viewers Jingle, rap, or chant The importance of cleanliness and washing hands National Restaurant Organization Restaurant workersIllustrated Poster or Flow Diagram Proper care of knives and cutting boards BacteriaGround beefRole play or simulation Dangers of thawing meat out on a counter Power Company Consumer Relations Dept. Homeowners who have lost power for 3+ days due to hurricane or ice storm Consumer Alert messages for broadcast on TV What to do with items from the refrigerator and freezer that have come to room temperature Mayonnaise in egg salad PicnickersUrgent Watch out! I’m going to get you!

81 Business Education RAFT Students are reviewing elements from “Insert” Drop Down Menu This RAFT uses the columns of Role and Audience to review basic elements and vocabulary of this unit. RoleAudienceFormatTopic Page number Writer of a documentList of questionsWhat to consider about how to format me and where I belong Text BoxTV audienceLate Night’s Top 10 List What you need to know to use me right. Clip artStudent preparing a PowerPoint presentation Song lyrics”Find me, Place me, Change Me” Column break Page breakOpinion statementWhy I’m more important than you A CaptionEditorSet of directionsHow to clarify what is in a pie chart or diagram Auto Text feature Writers of business letters Energizer Bunny commercial The advantages of using Auto Text

82 Review the strategies for INTEREST Tri-mind choices (Sternberg) Tic Tac Toe choice boards Learning Menus Show and Tell boards Cubes RAFTS With a partner: Describe your upcoming unit and a TARGET or 2 that you will be addressing Choose one of the above strategies and describe how you will use it in your classroom. How will you connect this learning activity to the TARGET(s)

83 Tier by: Readiness Degree of structure Need for support

84 Write a letter to yourself stating at least five key points that you would like to remember about this presentation and how you will use these things in your classroom. Task Cards/Work Cards Write a letter to your principal comparing what you learned today to what is happening in your school. Write a persuasive letter to your school board president convincing him/her that your school district must adopt the philosophy of differentiated instruction in your district.

85 Tips for Writing Task Cards/Work Cards Make sure the directions are clearly stated in student-friendly language. Include specific details (e.g., “Give a minimum of three examples) Include criteria for quality or a rubric so students clearly know your expectations for their work. As appropriate, sequence the steps students need to follow. Include examples or samples of work as necessary. Explain how students will share their work. Double-check that the directions can be followed by students independently.

86 Tiered assignments should be: -Different work, not simply more or less work -Equally active -Equally interesting and engaging -Fair in terms of work expectations and time needed -Require the use of key concepts, skills, or ideas -Are used as practice or daily work, NOT as an assessment task to be graded. -Learn from each other – share work!

87 Tiering by Readiness Level Spanish (clothing unit)- HS TARGET Communication (presentation mode) Cultures (products & perspectives) Connections (accessing information) Comparisons (cultural comparison) Communities (within & beyond the school)

88 Tiering by Readiness Level Spanish (clothing unit) – HS Modified for special needs/more concrete learner. You work for an ad agency and have been assigned to create a mini-catalog or a brochure for the big sale next weekend at a department store. Using magazine picture, authentic photos from the Internet, or your own drawings, create your sale flyer. You can decide the theme, age, or gender group to target. There must be at least 12 items, priced in euros. Make the ad as appealing and creative as possible and be ready to present the ad to the class.

89 Tiering by Readiness Level Spanish (clothing unit) - HS On-Target Tier for Most Students (grade level) Your role is to write dress code rules for school. Describe at least 6 types of clothes that are acceptable, and at least 6 that aren’t. Turn in a neatly written copy of the rules for approval, and then create a poster of fashion do’s and don’t, and be ready to present it to the class.

90 Tiering by Readiness Level Spanish (clothing unit) - HS Modified Tier for Complex/Abstract thinkers Your role is to write two role-playing scenarios for employees of a clothing store to use in practicing how to deal with a variety of customers. In each, set up practice conversations between two difficult customers and a sales person. The salesperson should encourage and persuade the customers, rather than be confrontational. One customer should complain about price and another about size and color. Submit a written copy, and be ready to present as a model of your favorite scenario of the two you’ve written.

91 Skill: Dribbling and Basketball Dribble from point A to point B in a straight line with one hand. Switch to the other hand and repeat. Use either hand and develop a new floor pattern Zigzag one hand then the other hand Increased speed Change pattern to simulate going around an opponent In and out of pylons as fast as possible Dribble with one hand - partner playing defense Increase speed and change hands Tiered Lesson

92 Experimental Design: Tiered Assignment Cubes or Think Dots TARGET: I can explain the various stages in the experimental design process.

93 1. Name and define the 6 steps in the experimental design process. 6. Create a data chart for an experiment that has an independent and dependent variable. Graph this data and label the graph properly. 5. Suppose an experimental design process with several trials showed that chickens lay more eggs when listening to music. What additional questions would a scientist ask about this experiment? 2. Design a question that would have an independent and a dependent variable. Label each variable. 3. Change a question into a hypothesis. 4. Change a hypothesis into a prediction statement using IF…, And…, Then...

94 Basic. What are the 6 steps of the experimental design process?. Explain the difference between an independent and dependent variable. 3. Write a hypothesis from this question: Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs?. Using If…, And… Then…, write a prediction statement for the following hypothesis: Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs 5. Make a double T chart that would compare an experiment where music is played for one group of chickens and not for another to see if music affects the number of eggs they lay. Label each variable. 6. Make a graph using the following information. Label which axis is the independent and dependent variable. Not playing music—5 chickens lay 17 eggs. Playing music—5 chickens lay 25 eggs.. What are the 6 steps of the experimental design process?. Explain the difference between an independent and dependent variable. 3. Write a hypothesis from this question: Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs?. Using If…, And… Then…, write a prediction statement for the following hypothesis: Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs 5. Make a double T chart that would compare an experiment where music is played for one group of chickens and not for another to see if music affects the number of eggs they lay. Label each variable. 6. Make a graph using the following information. Label which axis is the independent and dependent variable. Not playing music—5 chickens lay 17 eggs. Playing music—5 chickens lay 25 eggs.

95 Basic Cube Record Sheet. STEPS WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? Independent Variable - Dependent Variable -. MUSICAL EGGS Question: Does listening to music cause chickens to lay more eggs? Hypothesis:. PREDICTING EGGS Hypothesis: Listening to music causes chickens to lay more eggs. Prediction: If… And… Then… 5. DOUBLE “T” 6. GRAPH IT

96 Body Systems Basic Abstract

97 Basic Elements Defining the Core Curriculum Process: Thinking Skills ContentProcess: Research Skills Product Thinking SkillSubject MatterResearch Skills and/or Resources Culmination or Exhibition ListThe causes and effects for the technology evolution in education. After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information.

98 Differentiating the Core: Modifying the Process Element – Thinking Skills Process: Thinking Skills ContentProcess: Research Skills Product Judge with criteria The causes and effects for the technology evolution in education. After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information. List The causes and effects for the technology evolution in education. After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information.

99 Differentiating the Core: Modifying the Process Element – Research Skills Process: Thinking Skills ContentProcess: Research Skills Product Judge with criteria The causes and effects for the technology evolution in education. Interview an technology professor at the university; use the Internet to research; and read the text, Chapter IV. Write a paragraph to share the information. List The causes and effects for the technology evolution in education. After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information.

100 Differentiating the Core: Modifying the Product Element Process: Thinking Skills ContentProcess: Research Skills Product Judge with criteria The causes and effects for the technology evolution in education. Interview an technology professor at the university; use the Internet to research; and read the text, Chapter IV. Write an editorial and debate the positive and negative consequences of the technology evolution in education. ListThe causes and effects for the technology evolution in education. After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information.

101 Differentiating the Core: Modifying the Content Element Process: Thinking Skills ContentProcess: Research Skills Product Judge with criteria The use of technology for first, drill and practice & tutorial programs, to secondly, productivity tools, to thirdly, data-driven virtual learning that contributed to the causes and subsequent effects of the technology evolution in education. Interview an technology professor at the university; use the Internet to research; and read the text, Chapter IV. Write an editorial and debate the positive and negative consequences of the technology evolution in education. List The causes and effects for the technology evolution in education. After reading the text, pages Write a paragraph to share the information.

102 Review the strategies for READINESS Task cards Think dots With a partner: Describe your upcoming unit and a TARGET or 2 that you will be addressing Choose one of the above strategies and describe how you will use it in your classroom. How will you connect this learning activity to the TARGET(s)

103 The “Profiler” Choices involving Learning Profile

104 What is your preferred Learning Profile? Write Draw Act Sing Build

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110 Differentiation “Profiler” You have just attended a stimulating workshop on differentiated instruction and you feel motivated to let the world know more about differentiated instruction. Your “world” might be a group of students, parents, fellow teachers, and/or the general public. You will join a group of workshop participants who are as motivated as you are and share your excitement about differentiate instruction to spread the news about this teaching and learning philosophy! TARGET: I can explain key elements of differentiated instruction.

111 Differentiation “Musician” Your mission is to write and perform a song (any style of music) about the experience of observing in a classroom which is focused on developing units and using strategies that help to differentiated instruction. You can make up a new tune or write new lyrics that fit with an existing melody. You should have at least one verse about each of the FOUR elements that should be the focus of a differentiated classroom. Include a chorus about the goal of differentiated instruction. Make it personal and fun.

112 Differentiation “Writers” Your task is to write an article for USA Today telling the public how differentiated instruction helps teacher to meet the needs of diverse learners in their classrooms. You should minimally include the following information: How students differ as learners. How student learning differences affect how students learn. Evidence you have that explains that students work harder when what they are asked to do connect to something they are interested in doing and/or connects to their learning profile. Identify classroom techniques/strategies that support the achievement of students who have different readiness levels, different interests and/or different learning profiles.

113 Differentiation “Builders” Your group has been commissioned to build a model of a differentiated classroom for a local museum featuring best practices in education. Your model must accurately reflect the FOUR elements of differentiated instruction in a classroom where these elements are being practiced. You must be able to explain your model to museum officials.

114 Differentiation “Actors” Your job is to create and perform an episode of a children's or teenager’s television program. This episode should be all about differentiated instruction. Be sure to include the following information: What is differentiated instruction. What it is like being in a classroom where differentiated instruction is practiced. How you (the student) will benefit from being in a classroom where differentiated instruction is practiced.

115 Differentiation “Artists” Create a poster – or series of posters – that clearly illustrates the key points of what it means to differentiate instruction. Your poster(s) will be designed for those who are unable to read, so it/they must communicate clearly through pictures and graphics, and should not rely heavily on captions. Your posters should depict the three sets of FOUR elements of differentiated instruction. Poster paper, markers and other materials are available; let your instructor know what else you need.

116 RoleLevel 1: On or Below Grade LevelLevel 2: On or Above Grade Level Artist Draw or design an advertisement with descriptions of various clothing items, include the opinions of fashion experts. Draw or design an advertisement with descriptions of various clothing items, include opinions from fashion experts. Make up a new clothing item that is not invented yet. Singer/ Songwriter Write and perform a song or poem describing modern day clothing which includes public opinion of the clothing. Write and perform a song describing modern day clothing which includes public opinion of the clothing. Include a comparison to clothing worn when you were younger. Online Ad Writer Write an “online” advertisement for clothes with descriptions and customer reviews. Write an “online” advertisement for clothes with descriptions and customer reviews. Include a respectful comparison to clothing from other stores. Actor Act out a fashion show which includes a complete description of the models’ clothing and critiques from journalists. Act out a fashion show which includes a complete description of the models’ clothing and critiques from journalists. Include a comparison of the models’ clothing to the previous model.

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121 Review the strategies for LEARNING PROFILE The “Profiler” With a partner: Describe your upcoming unit and a TARGET or 2 that you will be addressing Describe how you will use this strategy in your classroom. How will you connect this learning activity to the TARGET(s)


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