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Dare to Differentiate Deborah Espitia Coordinator of World Languages & ESOL Leslie Grahn World Language Resource Teacher Howard County Public Schools,

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Presentation on theme: "Dare to Differentiate Deborah Espitia Coordinator of World Languages & ESOL Leslie Grahn World Language Resource Teacher Howard County Public Schools,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Dare to Differentiate Deborah Espitia Coordinator of World Languages & ESOL Leslie Grahn World Language Resource Teacher Howard County Public Schools, Maryland

2 Warm-up: Interest groups On a colored index card, write the name of your two favorite television shows. Find three or four other people who have at least one show/type of show in common with you. Sit together in a group.

3 Differentiation Foldable

4 How much background knowledge do I have about differentiation? What kinds of differentiation have I already tried? What are some of the barriers to incorporating differentiation?

5 Workshop Choice Board

6 Dare to Differentiate Outcomes Participants will:  Build background knowledge of research and application of differentiation strategies.  Participate in simulations of differentiation strategies.  Create differentiation activities for immediate use in their classrooms.  Receive a packet full of differentiation activity templates and examples.

7 DIFFERENTIATION: What is it?

8 Differentiation based on research and writings of: Carol Ann Tomlinson Professor of Educational Leadership University of Virginia

9 Essential Principles of Differentiation 1. Good curriculum comes first. 2. All tasks should be respectful of each learner. 3. When in doubt, teach up! 4. Use flexible grouping. 5. Become an assessment junkie. 6. Grade for growth.

10 The Cogs of Differentiation Tomlinson, 2003

11 Differentiation is a teacher’s response to learners’ needs guided by general principles of differentiation, such as respectful tasks ongoing assessment flexible grouping Teachers can differentiate according to students’ through a range of instructional and management strategies ProcessContent Product Interests Learning Profile Readiness

12 Differentiation concepts Classroom elements Content Process Products Learning Environment/ Affect Assessment

13 Content Process Product Environment Assessment Differentiation

14 Content Process Product Environment Assessment Differentiation

15 Content Process Product Environment Assessment Differentiation

16 Content Process Product Environment Assessment Differentiation

17 Content Process Product Environment Assessment Differentiation

18 How do I know how to DIFFERENTIATE?

19 Differentiation Concepts Student characteristics Readiness Interest Learning Profile

20 Differentiation Concepts Learning Profile Grouping Preferences Cognitive Style Learning Environment Needs Information Processing

21 MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES Bodily-Kinesthetic Naturalist Verbal-Linguistic Intrapersonal Musical- Rhythmic Interpersonal Visual- Spatial Logical- Mathematical

22 Style inventories in the target language Vark-learn.com - Multiple languages French - Quel est mon profil d’apprentissage?

23 Differentiation Concepts Readiness & Interests Pre-assessments Every Student Response Surveys ??

24 Digging deeper into DIFFERENTIATION

25 Differentiation Strategies Learning Centers R.A.F.T.s Choice Boards Tiered Assignments WebQuests Flexible Grouping

26 DIFFERENTIATION STRATEGIES: Learning Centers

27 What are Learning Centers? Areas set up in the classroom with learning activities directed at a specific: –Interest –Skill –Extended study of essential concept

28 Learning Centers (random groupings) ABCDEABCDE

29 Reflection on Learning Centers How can I transform the learning centers I just experienced to ones I can use for my classroom?

30 Learning Centers A = Picture prompt B = Color coding activity C = Experience with/not D = Highlight words that relate E = Choose from lists

31 Time for a break!

32 Form a team with four different “fuel levels”

33 DIFFERENTIATION STRATEGIES: RAFT Assignments

34 RAFT Assignments Focus on: Writing and reasoning Ideas around a topic Student choice, interest Learning styles, preferences

35 R = ROLE A = AUDIENCE F = FORMAT T = TOPIC What does RAFT mean?

36 Let’s build a RAFT

37 RAFT Assignments As a group, choose a topic for your RAFT. Individually, on a long strip of paper, create one row including role, audience, format, and topic. Glue your team’s RAFT strips to the grid and create a copy for yourself.

38 DIFFERENTIATION STRATEGIES: Choice Boards

39 CHOICE BOARDS Students choose from a menu of options Tasks vary by process and interest Some anchor activities can be required of all students Can be used for homework, projects, and assessment

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41 Build Your Own Choice Board Look through the CHOICE BOARD section of your binder for ideas. Now, review your CHOICE BOARD to note how the activities address interests, readiness, and learning profile.

42 DIFFERENTIATION STRATEGIES: Tiered Assignments

43 Tiered Assignments What are they? Tiered assignments are parallel tasks at varied levels of complexity, depth and abstractness with various degrees of scaffolding, support, or direction. Students work on different levels of activities, all with the same essential understanding or goal in mind.

44 Tiered Assignments What are they? Tiered assignments accommodate mainly for differences in student readiness and performance levels and allow students to work toward a goal or objective at a level that builds on their prior knowledge and encourages continued growth.

45 Tiered Assignments Why use them? One of the main benefits of tiered assignments is that they allow students to work on tasks that are neither too easy nor too difficult. They are highly motivating because they allow students to be successful at their level of readiness. Tiered assignments also allow students to work in their specific learning styles or preferences.

46 Analyzing a Tiered Assignment  Parallel tasks  Varying levels of complexity  Various degrees of scaffolding, support, or direction  Different levels of activity with same essential goals  Builds on prior knowledge and encourages continued growth

47 The Equalizer

48 DIFFERENTIATION STRATEGIES: Flexible Grouping

49 How did we group you today? Interest (TV shows) Random (colored index cards) Readiness (fuel gauge groups)

50 Dare to Differentiate Wiki daretodifferentiate.wikispaces.com

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58 Reflection Time On the back of the foldable you created at the beginning of today’s session, reflect on what you have learned today about DIFFERENTIATION.

59 Differentiation Buddies

60 Wait! We’ve got...

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62 Dare to DIFFERENTIATE Take the dare.

63 Dare to DIFFERENTIATE


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