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UbD and DI Bringing it all together!. Bringing It All Together: Curriculum and Instruction Through the Lens of UbD and DI How do the principles of backward.

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Presentation on theme: "UbD and DI Bringing it all together!. Bringing It All Together: Curriculum and Instruction Through the Lens of UbD and DI How do the principles of backward."— Presentation transcript:

1 UbD and DI Bringing it all together!

2 Bringing It All Together: Curriculum and Instruction Through the Lens of UbD and DI How do the principles of backward design and differentiation look when they are used together in the planning process? What are the potential benefits to learners of classrooms in which both models are used? What should we expect to see in classrooms using backward design and differentiation?

3 To this point, we have examined key elements in backward design and differentiation We have looked at support for the two models in theory and research, –explored pedagogical connections between the models, and –probed the issue of grading as it relates to backward design to craft curriculum and differentiation to ensure instructional fit for learners. –That is the goal of this chapter.

4 A Quick Review of Essential Goals of UbD and DI A brief summary of essential elements in backward design and differentiation is helpful at this point to focus thinking about the illustrations of how the two models work together that will follow in this chapter. Both Understanding by Design and Differentiated Instruction are –complex and multifaceted The discussion that follows briefly describes essential elements in the two models as they would guide a teacher who embraces and integrates both models.

5 Teachers whose work is guided by the principles of backward design and differentiated instruction do the following: Identify desired learning results for the subject and topics they teach.  Determine what students should know, understand, and be able to do as a result of the study.  Specify big ideas worthy of understanding.  Delineate enduring understandings on which the teacher and students will focus.  State provocative, essential questions that will guide students' exploration of the big ideas.  Articulate specific knowledge and skill that students will need for effective performance on the goals.

6 Teachers whose work is guided by the principles of backward design and differentiated instruction do the following: Determine acceptable evidence of student learning.  Decide what evidence will indicate that students understand the big ideas.  Consider what performances will indicate that the learners understand and can apply what they have learned, and by what criteria those performances will be judged.  Determine what will constitute evidence of student proficiency with the essential knowledge, understanding, and skill.

7 Teachers whose work is guided by the principles of backward design and differentiated instruction do the following: Plan learning experiences and instruction based on the first two principles.  Decide what essential knowledge, understanding, and skill needs to be taught and coached.  Determine how that should best be taught in light of the content goals.  Plan to ensure that learning is engaging and effective in the context of specified goals and needed evidence.

8 Teachers whose work is guided by the principles of backward design and differentiated instruction do the following: Regard learner differences as inevitable, important, and valuable in teaching and learning.  Persist in developing greater understanding of each student's readiness to succeed with designated content goals to enhance individual academic growth, interests that might connect with content goals to enhance motivation, and preferred modes of learning to enhance efficiency of learning.  Work with students, family, and school personnel to understand and address learners' backgrounds and experiences, including gender, culture, language, race, and personal strengths, and to address those factors in teaching and learning plans.

9 Teachers whose work is guided by the principles of backward design and differentiated instruction do the following: Address learners' affective needs as a means of supporting student success.  Respond actively to students' need for affirmation, contribution, power, purpose, and challenge.  Understand and respond to the reality that these needs will be met differently for different students.  Understand and respond to the reality that a student's motivation to learn is tethered to a sense of affirmation, safety, and success.

10 Teachers whose work is guided by the principles of backward design and differentiated instruction do the following: Address learners' affective needs as a means of supporting student success.  Respond actively to students' need for affirmation, contribution, power, purpose, and challenge.  Understand and respond to the reality that these needs will be met differently for different students.  Understand and respond to the reality that a student's motivation to learn is tethered to a sense of affirmation, safety, and success.

11 Teachers whose work is guided by the principles of backward design and differentiated instruction do the following: Periodically review and articulate clear learning goals that specify what students should know, understand, and be able to do as a result of each segment of learning.  Ensure that each student has full access to essential knowledge, understanding, and skill in each segment of study.  Ensure that tasks and assessments focus tightly on knowledge, understanding, and skill designated as essential in a segment of study.  Ensure that all students reason and work at high levels.  Ensure that all students have equally engaging, equally interesting tasks.

12 Teachers whose work is guided by the principles of backward design and differentiated instruction do the following: Use systematic pre-assessment and ongoing assessment aligned with designated goals to make instructional decisions and adaptations.  Provide opportunities for students to build requisite competencies when assessment results indicate a student lacks precursor knowledge, understanding, or skill necessary for success with designated content goals.  Provide opportunities for additional instruction, coaching, or practice when assessment results indicate that need for a student or group of students.  Provide opportunities to advance or extend knowledge when assessment results indicate that a student or group of students has achieved mastery of designated content goals.

13 Teachers whose work is guided by the principles of backward design and differentiated instruction do the following: Employ flexibility in instructional planning and classroom routines to support success for each learner.  Use space, time, materials, student groupings, and modes of exploring and expressing learning flexibly to maximize the opportunity for success for a full range of learners when students work with tasks and assessments.  Use multiple modes of presentation, illustrations linked to a wide range of cultures and experiences, and various support systems to maximize the opportunity for a full range of learner success when students work with tasks and assessments.  Encourage each student to work at a level of complexity or degree of difficulty that is challenging for that student, and provide scaffolding necessary for the students to succeed at the new level of challenge

14 Teachers whose work is guided by the principles of backward design and differentiated instruction do the following: Gather evidence of student learning in a variety of formats.  Provide varied options for demonstrating what students know, understand, and can do.  Ensure that students know what “success” looks like in their work— including both nonnegotiable class requirements and student- or teacher- specified goals for individuals.  Together, backward design and differentiation describe a comprehensive way of thinking about curriculum, assessment, and instruction, stemming from a shared understanding of what constitutes effective teaching and learning. In the instructional planning of teachers guided by backward design and differentiation, then, we should expect to see systematic attention to content goals they plan to teach and to the students who will learn them. teachers will focus on clarity of goal and flexibility in arriving at the goal..

15 We'll first take a look at a unit plan for 5th or 6th graders on nutrition.  Notice how the backward design process is applied and how it contributes to goal clarity in all stages of the unit.  Then we'll examine options for differentiating the unit.  At that point, look for flexible approaches to helping a diverse group of learners reach the articulated goals.

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