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What Do You Need to Know About Characters? Characters Protagonist and Antagonist Round and Flat Characters Static and Dynamic Characters Character Motivation.

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Presentation on theme: "What Do You Need to Know About Characters? Characters Protagonist and Antagonist Round and Flat Characters Static and Dynamic Characters Character Motivation."— Presentation transcript:

1 What Do You Need to Know About Characters? Characters Protagonist and Antagonist Round and Flat Characters Static and Dynamic Characters Character Motivation Characterization Direct Characterization Indirect Characterization Your Turn Feature Menu

2 Characters are the people we meet in a story, poem, or play. We learn about them through their traits and their interactions with others. Characters

3 Characters’ traits are the qualities that make up their personalities. Characters romantic You get to know characters by observing their traits. shycompetitivemoody

4 Characters Interactions among characters show how they relate to each other and affect one another. As Brandon walked down the hall, he saw Melanie struggling with her books. He stopped for a second, as if he might help, then laughed loudly and continued on his way. That’s not a very positive interaction. He doesn’t act like a caring person would act. Paying attention to characters’ interactions helps you make judgments about their personality traits. [End of Section]

5 The protagonist in a story is the main character, the one you sometimes want to root for. Characters Protagonist and Antagonist An antagonist is a character who tries to keep the protagonist from succeeding.

6 Characters Protagonist and Antagonist Daniel sat at the end of the bench, hanging his head. He couldn’t believe he’d had to sit through another game without playing. He thought of all the time he’d spent practicing and looked up at his little brother in the stands, waiting patiently for him to get into the game. Everyone knew he was too good to be riding the bench. Coach Adams smirked at Daniel’s disappointment and chuckled to himself. Who is the protagonist? Who is the antagonist? [End of Section] Quick Check

7 Characters Protagonist and Antagonist Daniel sat at the end of the bench, hanging his head. He couldn’t believe he’d had to sit through another game without playing. He thought of all the time he’d spent practicing and looked up at his little brother in the stands, waiting patiently for him to get into the game. Everyone knew he was too good to be riding the bench. Coach Adams smirked at Daniel’s disappointment and chuckled to himself. Who is the protagonist? Daniel. He’s the main character, and readers probably will feel sympathy toward him. Quick Check

8 Characters Protagonist and Antagonist Daniel sat at the end of the bench, hanging his head. He couldn’t believe he’d had to sit through another game without playing. He thought of all the time he’d spent practicing and looked up at his little brother in the stands, waiting patiently for him to get into the game. Everyone knew he was too good to be riding the bench. Coach Adams smirked at Daniel’s disappointment and chuckled to himself. Who is the antagonist? Coach Adams. He tries to keep Daniel from succeeding by keeping him out of the game. Quick Check

9 Round characters have many different traits. Characters Round and Flat Characters studious stylish mischievous shy Like real people, they have more than one side to their personalities.

10 Characters Round and Flat Characters Flat characters have just one or two traits. grumpy grouchy They can be described in a word or two.

11 Character Round and Flat Characters Max wished he could cheer up Daniel. There was nothing Max hated more than a sour mood. He could turn anything into a joke, and usually did. Daniel, on the other hand, was more complicated than that. Sure, he wanted to laugh at his problems, but he felt torn between goofing around with his friends and helping his family now that his father was ill. Still, he knew Max meant well and didn’t want to let his friend down. [End of Section] Which boy is the best example of a round character? Why? Quick Check

12 Character Round and Flat Characters Max wished he could cheer up Daniel. There was nothing Max hated more than a sour mood. He could turn anything into a joke, and usually did. Daniel, on the other hand, was more complicated than that. Sure, he wanted to laugh at his problems, but he felt torn between goofing around with his friends and helping his family now that his father was ill. Still, he knew Max meant well and didn’t want to let his friend down. Which boy is the best example of a round character? Why? Daniel. He has many traits: He is fun-loving yet responsible, and he’s also a caring friend. Quick Check

13 Character Static and Dynamic Characters A static character does not change in the course of the story. Static characters often provide a foil, or contrast, to the protagonist. A good foil for a peaceful protagonist would be a character who is often angry or ill-tempered.

14 Character Static and Dynamic Characters A dynamic character grows and changes through the course of a story. Like real people, they are transformed by time and experience.

15 Character Static and Dynamic Characters When the team won the championship, the crowd went wild. It was Daniel who cheered the loudest and longest for his old teammates. He had wanted so badly to get on the court to impress his brother, but Joe’s grin told him that he was happy to have some company up in the stands. Daniel even offered Coach Adams a thumbs-up, but the coach simply sneered at his former player, just like he always had. Daniel shrugged. What clues show that Daniel is a dynamic character? What suggests that Coach Adams is a static character? [End of Section] Quick Check

16 Character Static and Dynamic Characters When the team won the championship, the crowd went wild. It was Daniel who cheered the loudest and longest for his old teammates. He had wanted so badly to get on the court to impress his brother, but Joe’s grin told him that he was happy to have some company up in the stands. Daniel even offered Coach Adams a thumbs-up, but the coach simply sneered at his former player, just like he always had. Daniel shrugged. What clues show that Daniel is a dynamic character? Daniel changes: He quits the team and realizes that he doesn’t have to play to impress his brother. Quick Check

17 Character Static and Dynamic Characters When the team won the championship, the crowd went wild. It was Daniel who cheered the loudest and longest for his old teammates. He had wanted so badly to get on the court to impress his brother, but Joe’s grin told him that he was happy to have some company up in the stands. Daniel even offered Coach Adams a thumbs-up, but the coach simply sneered at his former player, just like he always had. Daniel shrugged. What suggests that Coach Adams is a static character? Adams hasn’t changed: He is still sneering. His negativity contrasts with Daniel’s positive outlook. Quick Check

18 Character Motivation A character’s motivation is the reason he or she behaves in a certain way. feelings Many things may contribute to a character’s motivation. feelingsexperiencesothers’ actions

19 Coach Adams looked down the bench at Daniel and couldn’t help but laugh at how depressed his player looked. He knew he shouldn’t be so mean, but Daniel was just too perfect; Coach felt like he was doing him a favor by teaching him that he couldn’t win at everything. Besides, when he was Daniel’s age, he’d spent plenty of time on the bench— thanks to Daniel’s father, who’d stolen his starting position. Payback felt good. Quick Check What are Coach Adams’s motivations for keeping Daniel on the bench? [End of Section] Character Motivation

20 Quick Check Coach Adams looked down the bench at Daniel and couldn’t help but laugh at how depressed his player looked. He knew he shouldn’t be so mean, but Daniel was just too perfect; Coach felt like he was doing him a favor by teaching him that he couldn’t win at everything. Besides, when he was Daniel’s age, he’d spent plenty of time on the bench— thanks to Daniel’s father, who’d stolen his starting position. Payback felt good. What are Coach Adams’s motivations for keeping Daniel on the bench? feelings experiences others’ actions Character Motivation

21 Characterization Characterization is how an author reveals characters’ personalities and brings them to life.

22 When writers use direct characterization, they tell us directly what characters are like or what their motives are. She was one of those people who could set you at ease as soon as she entered the room. She was warm-hearted, genuine and kind. She was one of those people who could set you at ease as soon as she entered the room. She was warm-hearted, genuine, and kind. Characterization Direct Characterization [End of Section]

23 Characterization Indirect Characterization When writers use indirect characterization, they show the characters’ traits, allowing the reader to make inferences based on observations. As she walked down the hall, her classmates scurried out of her path. The corners of her mouth turned down and her eyes were slits. She slammed shut each open locker door she passed. As she walked down the hall, her classmates scurried out of her path. The corners of her mouth turned down, and her eyes were slits. She slammed shut each open locker door she passed.

24 Writers show us characters by revealing dialogue appearanceprivate thoughts others’ reactions actions Characterization Indirect Characterization

25 what characters say and don’t say, and Dialogue can reveal a lot about characters and their relationships with each other. Pay attention to how characters respond to each other. Characterization Indirect Characterization

26 Pay attention to language the writer uses to describe a character’s appearance, including looks, clothes, and behavior. Does the description give you a positive or negative impression of the character? Which words contribute to this impression? Her icy eyes were spaced narrowly, just above her sharp nose. They were framed by thin brows whose arch formed severe peaks at her forehead. Two tight, pinched lips and a sharp V of a chin finished off her face. Characterization Indirect Characterization

27 Writers can take us into a character’s mind to reveal the private thoughts and personality traits of that character. As you read, pay close attention to any descriptions of a character’s thoughts and feelings. Characterization Indirect Characterization

28 Watch for how other characters react to a character. Pay attention to how others feel about the character, and what others say about the character. Characterization Indirect Characterization

29 How characters behave, including how they treat each other, often reveals a lot about them. Observe characters’ actions to determine what their personalities are like, what motivates them, and how they deal with conflict. Characterization Indirect Characterization

30 How does the author show the character’s traits? Based on this excerpt, how would you characterize this man? Quick Check “Just keep driving and no one gets hurt,” he growled. He wore head-to-toe black, from his heavy leather boots to the wool ski mask that obscured his face. Beads of sweat dampened his mask, and the white sack he clutched so tightly was soaked through with red dye. His breathing was rapid and anxious, and his eyes darted furiously from the rearview mirror to the passenger’s side window. [End of Section] Characterization Indirect Characterization

31 He wore head-to-toe black, from his heavy leather boots to the wool ski mask that obscured his face. Beads of sweat dampened his mask, and the white sack he clutched so tightly was soaked through with red dye. Speech Actions Description Quick Check How does the author show the character’s traits? Characterization Indirect Characterization His breathing was rapid and anxious, and his eyes darted furiously from the rearview mirror to the passenger’s side window. “Just keep driving and no one gets hurt,” he growled.

32 He looks and sounds angry, dangerous, desperate, and threatening. Quick Check Characterization Indirect Characterization “Just keep driving and no one gets hurt,” he growled. He wore head-to-toe black, from his heavy leather boots to the wool ski mask that obscured his face. Beads of sweat dampened his mask, and the white sack he clutched so tightly was soaked through with red dye. His breathing was rapid and anxious, and his eyes darted furiously from the rearview mirror to the passenger’s side window. Based on this excerpt, how would you characterize this man?

33 Are you a good judge of character? Analyze two characters from a movie, TV show, or story. First, fill out this chart. Then, write a brief sketch of each character. Share your sketches with a partner. Character 1Character 2 antagonist or protagonist round or flat static or dynamic [End of Section] Analyze Character Your Turn

34 The End


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