Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Connected Government Technical Overview October 2005.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Connected Government Technical Overview October 2005."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Connected Government Technical Overview October 2005

2 2 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Agenda Connected Government Overview Overview of Cisco ® Connected Government—Intra-agency Roadmap Overview of Cisco Connected Government—Interagency Roadmap Applying Cisco Connected Government to Public Safety Agencies Mapping Case Studies to the Phases of Cisco Connected Government Why Cisco? Discussion

3 3 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Connected Government Overview

4 4 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Government Agency Challenges Improve operational efficiencies with proactive strategic planning, policy development, resource allocation, and administrative and financial planning Increase reach and responsiveness of constituent services Reduce operational costs Enhance quality and flow of information across chain of command Establish resilient network infrastructure that supports interagency collaboration

5 5 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Source: “Forecast: State and Local Government, North America, 2004–2007” (Gartner; 2004) Current Trends in Public Safety Agencies— Investments to Improve Information Flow Investments in last-mile wireless and communication technologies Investments in new business processes Investments in critical public safety applications Computer-aided dispatch (CAD) Records management system (RMS) Multijurisdictional communication networks Mobile data terminals Biometrics Auto vehicle locator Mug shots and digitized images Crime analysis

6 6 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Agency Drivers for Change Intra-agency/Interagency Collaboration Enable interoperable communications to support constituent services, agency collaboration, and joint operations Consolidate common government services to enhance operational efficiency Shared Services Information Sharing Improve operational efficiency by providing equal interagency access to critical information Foster sharing of physical resources and equipment (e.g., incident command vehicles, aircraft, etc.) across agencies to reduce costs Infrastructure Sharing

7 7 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public What Is a Connected Government? All branches of government support the controlled flow of information Services reach constituents when they need them, where they need them, and in the way they need them Services reach more constituents with less cost Government is engaged with constituents

8 8 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Overview of Cisco Connected Government Reference network and application architectures with a corresponding roadmap Uses government and private-sector best practices to enable improved information sharing across organizational boundaries Roadmap transitions governments through a multiphase approach, synchronized with process change Yields realistic near-term benefits while making progress toward long-term objectives Network Assessment tool Compares department mission with IT capability

9 9 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public How to enable and control information flow across application and organization boundaries and services? How to consolidate and manage the network, computer and storage needs across application and organization boundaries? How to collaborate with public and private sector constituents, partners, and suppliers across application and organizational boundaries? Data Center BranchCampusTeleworker MAN / WAN Server Network Virtualization Services Places in the Network StorageClients Infrastructure Sharing Application Services Voice & Collaboration Services Computer Services Identity Services Security Services Mobility Services Storage Services Infrastructure Services Information Sharing IPC/IPCC SecurityWireless Collaboration Services Services that Can Be Easily Modified, Distributed, Scaled, and Maintained and that Integrate Legacy Systems Cost-Effectively Goal: Moving to a More Connected Government Goal: Moving to a More Connected Government Addressing the Government Challenge: Improve Service Without Increased Budgets

10 10 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Connected Government Roadmap Sections illustrate common application of roadmap, but there are exceptions For some agencies, sharing across groups within one agency is as complex as sharing between agencies For these agencies, all six phases can be applied within the same agency before branching out between agencies Intra-agency Focus Enhances agency’s ability to serve constituents wherever they are and whenever they need assistance Phases 1 to 3 Interagency Focus Enables connectivity, communication, and collaboration between agencies Increases service effectiveness and public safety Phases 3 to 6 12 Work from inside out

11 11 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Overview of Cisco Connected Government— Intra-agency Roadmap

12 12 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public 1 Phase 1: “Siloed” Information and Communications Systems Redundant systems, resources, information, and processes designed for independent operation within each department Prerequisites to enter next phase Ensure quality of service (QoS) Achieve high network availability Establish robust, integrated network security

13 13 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Phase 1: “Siloed” Information and Communications Systems—Cont’d Limited Network Redundancy Data Center Headquarters Branch No Integrated Security Separate Voice and Data Network Limited Connectivity to the Data Center Mobile Network Limited Mobile Data Access Connectivity to Data Center Is Potential Single Point of Failure Lack of Any-to-Any Voice, Video, or Data Real-Time Communication DMZ Increased Cost and Complexity Network Downtime Network at Risk Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) Leased Lines Interne t

14 14 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public High Availability QoS and Convergent Communications Collaboration Applications Collaboration Applications Integrated Security Getting Out of the Silos

15 15 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public High Availability: Resilient Network Design AutoSecure, Warm Reload, Control Plane Policing, Nonstop Forwarding/Stateful Switchover (NSF/SSO), Switch Cluster, Configuration Rollback, Fault Containment, and Generic Online Diagnostics Routing Protocol and Spanning- Tree Enhancements, Cisco EtherChannel ® Technology, Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Traffic Engineering, Gateway Load Balancing Protocol (GLBP)/Hot Standby Routing Protocol, Multilink Point-to-Point Protocol, Dial-On-Demand Routing, and Resilient Packet Ring Survivable Remote Site Telephony (SRST), CO-Based Gateways, Teleworker, Advanced Worm Mitigation, Call Center Resiliency, and User Mobility Device-Level Resilience Network-Level Resilience Systems-Level Resilience In Case Of Emergency

16 16 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public CoreDistribution Access Protect bandwidth and priority traffic Protect switch CPUs Enforce access control policies Secure access for authorized users and “safe systems” Secure “hot ports” and protect switch CPUs Mitigate man-in-the-middle attacks Protect links proactively Integrated Security Protect core as high-speed interconnect to rest of the network Ensure authorized user access, protect links and switches, and defend against malicious attacks Protect links to distribution and core from attacks that interrupt control traffic and device manageability Advanced Integrated Security

17 17 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Quality of Service GW AccessDistribution Voice Data Core Scavenger Voice Data Scavenger QoS Is Integral to the Converged Campus Network Guaranteed, predictable behavior for unmatched control over network traffic Greater adaptability to future needs Protects against network security threats by guaranteeing bandwidth

18 18 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Convergent Communications Workplace services Voice mail and unified messaging Emergency responder Customer contact Rich-media conferencing ApplicationsEndpointsCall ControlInfrastructure IP phones Wireless phones Cisco IP Communicator Cisco VT Advantage Hosted call control Cisco CallManager Cisco CallManager Express Integrated services routers Intelligent network infrastructure Security QoS Availability Management Administration A Completely Flexible, Resilient, and Secure Suite of Communications Applications that Scale and Adapt to the Needs of Any Organization

19 19 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Converged Communications for Distributed Branches Headquarters 100–200 Employees Regional Headquarters 25–75 Employees Branch 10–20 Employees Cisco Integrated Services Router with Cisco CallManager Express, Cisco Unity Express, and Cisco IOS Firewall Cisco Integrated Services Router with Cisco CallManager Express, Cisco Unity™ Express, and Cisco IOS Firewall Public Internet, VPN, or Private WAN with Voice over IP PSTN

20 20 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Headquarters A PSTN WAN Cisco Integrated Services Router with SRST Cisco 7200 Applications Server WAN link fails—IP phones lose contact with CCM IP phones exchange Keep Alive messages and Call Processing messages with Campus-Located CallManager (CCM) IP phones register with local router as router of last resort Router queries phones for configuration and auto-configures itself Router provides call processing for duration of failure via PSTN Upon restoration of WAN, IP phones revert back to CCM Police Station SRST—How It Works Cisco CallManager Cluster X

21 21 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Voice Video IM Web Integrated Rich-Media Conferencing Voice Conferencing Scalable IP and TDM platform IP integration to backbone, platform, and desktop Web Conferencing Tightly integrated fourth-generation solution Complete meeting management and control Videoconferencing Integrated multipoint videoconferencing Broad endpoint support

22 22 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Rich-Media Conferencing Experience Who’s Sharing Who’s Speaking Who’s Attending How Attending 2004 Results Movable, Sizable Video Window As Natural and Effective As Face-to-Face Meetings Complete Voice, Video, and Web Conferencing Capabilities and Control

23 23 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public List of Relevant Resources IP Communications Routing and Switching

24 24 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Branch Campus Data Center SRST Cisco Unity Messaging Integrated Router Security Centralized Management and Call Control Cisco MeetingPlace DMZ Interne t IP WAN Delivers Secure Communication and Collaboration Through a Complete Suite of Applications Integrated with the Infrastructure Phase 2: Intra-agency Collaboration

25 25 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Still Unable to Integrate Remote and Field Workers Remaining Challenge: Phase 2: Intra-agency Collaboration

26 26 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public VPNs Enterprise Mobility Network Capacity Design Network Identity Integrating Remote Resources

27 27 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public VPNs: Advanced Secure Access for Remote Sites Internet = DMVPN Tunnel 2800 Customer B Customer C Provider Edge Router Customer A Branches and Field Networks Are Protected by an Underlying Self-Defending Network IP Security (IPSec) Dynamic Multipoint VPN (DMVPN) Zero-Touch Provisioning, Dynamic Mesh VPN Tunnels Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) and IPSec with Dynamic Routing Use the Best Routing in the Business for Maximum Control and Flexibility Voice and Video Enabled VPN (V 3 PN) Best-in-Class QoS with IPSec VPNs for Multiservice, High- Quality, Jitter-Free Voice, Video, and High-Priority Data IPSec Easy VPN Remote-Access Hub and Spoke VPNs Using Centralized Policy Push

28 28 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public User Identity-Based Network Access User-Based Policies Applied (Bandwidth, QoS, etc.) HQ or Branch Authorized Users and Devices Unauthorized Users and Devices Identity-Based Network Access Determines Who Gets Access and What They Can Do Equivalent to placing a security guard at each switch port Only authorized users can get network access Unauthorized users can be placed into “guest” VLANs Prevents unauthorized access points (APs)

29 29 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Access Control, Packet Inspection Firewall Services Application Intelligence, Content Inspection, Virus Mitigation Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) and Networking Audio and Video Services Identity, Virtualization, QoS Segmentation, Traffic Visibility Network Intelligence Cisco PIX CSA NAC Quarantine VLAN Cisco Router CSA VPN Access VPN Cisco DDoS CSA Cisco ® Router Cisco Catalyst ® Cisco Catalyst Identity-Based Networking Cisco IPS Application Inspection, Use Enforcement, Web Control Application Security Malware and Content Defense, Anomaly Detection Anti-X Defenses Traffic and Admission Control, Proactive Response Containment and Control Extending Security to Remote Users: Security Across the Infrastructure

30 30 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public PrivacyControlManagement Enterprise-Class Encryption WPA—Temporal Key Integrity Protocol WPA2—AES Secure Connectivity for Wireless LANs (WLANs) WLAN Management for WLANs Centralized Configuration, Monitoring, and Analysis Single Management Console Automation of Repetitive Time- Consuming Tasks Trust and Identity Solutions for WLANs Robust Per-User Authentication 802.1X and Extensible Authentication Protocol Types Identity-Based Networking Threat Defense for WLANs WLAN Threat Defense Solution Rogue AP Detection and Suppression Protection from Network Attacks Rogue AP Malicious Hacker Enterprisewide Mobility: Wireless LAN Security Across HQ Protection Cisco Wireless Security Suite Cisco SWAN Cisco Structured Wireless-Aware Network (SWAN)

31 31 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public 2. Identify Location and Early Evidence 3. Identify Resources Message: Suspected Card Poster at Dean St. and Soho Sq. Proceed To Area with Caution. 1. Identify Potential Situation 5. Collate Evidence Enterprisewide Mobility: Connecting the Mobile Vehicle and Worker HeadquartersBranch Applications Database Police Station Mobile vehicles connected to the headquarters via IP to enable applications (e.g., filing, fingerprints, geographic information systems, photos, database queries, video) Street officers connected to the headquarters via wireless with PDAs Nearest Responding Officer ID: #234 Dept: Street Maintenance Location: Dean St. Distance: 28 yards 4. Deploy Resources Police Intranet IP Is the Connecting Glue of Wireless and Wire Line Police Intranet IP Is the Connecting Glue of Wireless and Wire Line

32 32 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public WLAN Hotspot s General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) Fallback General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) Fallback GPRS Wireless Cisco Mobile Access Router Local WLA N Internet Mobile Access Router, WLAN, and General Packet Radio Service Fallback

33 33 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Source of Relevant Resources Security Mobility

34 34 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Phase 3: Integrated Remote Resources Remote Workers Partners/SuppliersBranch Headquarters Data Center Cisco Secure Access Control Server Wireless LAN Solution Engine Wireless LAN Services Module Cisco APs Cisco Compatible Clients Cisco APs Cisco Compatible Clients Cisco APs Identity based networking Media Encryption Enables Worker Mobility and Secure, Real-Time Access to All Agency Resources Regardless of Location DMZ VPN WA N Internet WA N

35 35 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Phase 3: Integrated Remote Resources Lack of Communication Between Agencies Remaining Challenge:

36 36 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Resilient WAN and Metropolitan-Area Network (MAN) Enabling Interagency Collaboration Network Scalability

37 37 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public High Availability SecurityScalability QoS Management The Enterprise WAN and MAN: The Glue that Binds Headquarters 2 Branch Mobile Workers Headquarters 1 Headquarters 1 Data Center Internet Enterprise Intranet

38 38 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public The Organization’s WAN and MAN: Flexibility and Deployment Choices Choose from a variety of scalable technologies to connect your whole organization Manage as much or as little of your WAN as you require Migrate to new WAN technologies by using your existing Cisco investment Five architecture alternatives: Encrypted Layer 2 connectivity (frame relay, ATM, etc.) IP VPN (Service Provider [SP]–managed MPLS) IPSec VPN (Internet) Multi-VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) segmentation (per VRF tunneling) Self-deployed MPLS VPN segmentation

39 39 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Reduces Overall Administration and Management Costs by Providing Automated Resource Management, Rapid Profile-Based Provisioning, and Audit and Monitoring Capabilities IP Solution Center for MPLS VPN and QoS Northbound Interface Layer 3 VPNLayer 2 VPN QoS MPLS Traffic Engineering Trouble- Shooting Cisco IP Solution Center Network-Intelligent Element Manager for MPLS and Metro Ethernet Networks PlanningProvisioning Cisco MPLS VPN Simplifies, Integrates, and Automates VPN and QoS Management Customer Operations Support System GUI MPLS Core

40 40 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Source of Relevant Resources Next-Generation WAN and MAN Design Guidelines tions_packages_list.html

41 41 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Overview of Cisco Connected Government— Interagency Roadmap

42 42 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public WA N Phase 4: Interagency Collaboration Remove Workers Branch Headquarters 1 Data Center Headquarters 2 Self- Deployed MPLS Encrypted Layer 2 Connectivity IPSec VPN SP-Managed MPLS VPN Implements Agencies’ Access Policies and Enables Interagency Communication and Collaboration VPN ISP, Broadband, etc. IP VPN (MPLS, V 3 PN, etc.)

43 43 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Phase 4: Interagency Collaboration No Data Center Continuity or Consolidation Remaining Challenge:

44 44 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Enabling Interagency Infrastructure Sharing Data-Center Consolidation Network Automation

45 45 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Evolution of the Data Center Automation Storage Network Compute Dynamic Provisioning and Autonomic Information Lifecycle Management to Enable Business Agility Business Policies On Demand Service-Oriented Virtualization StorageNetworkCompute Enterprise Applications Management of Resources Independent of Underlying Physical Infrastructure to Increase Utilization, Efficiency, and Flexibility Data Network Server Fabric Network Centralization and Standardization to Lower Costs, Improve Efficiency, and Uptime Consolidation LAN WAN MAN SAN Storage Network Intelligent Information Network HPC Cluster GRID

46 46 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Shared Pools of Storage Resources Shared Pools of Compute Resources Application Message Services Message Translation and Transformation, Application Authentication and Authorization, and Business Event Visibility Intra-data CenterExtra-data Center Storage Network Fiber Channel iSCSI FICON Server Farm Gig and 10GB Ethernet Blade Switch Server Fabric Infiniband 10GB Ethernet Blade Switch DC Interconnect DWDM, SONET and SDH WAN, FCIP DC Access Internet MPLS, IPSEC, SSL VPN, DNS Optimization Intelligent Information MANAGEMENT Services Integration Network Integration Applications Storage Fabric Applications Replication Server-less Backup Point in Time Copy Continuous Data Protection Volume Management Adaptive Threat Defense Virtual Firewall Services Virtual Intrusion Prevention Denial-of-Service Guard Network Antivirus Host Protection Application Optimization Virtual Server Balancing Web, Video, and File Caching Wide Area Optimization SSL Offload TCP Offload Application Integration Multi-Device Virtual Context Management API Policy-based Management API Service Optimization Management Andiamo Topspin FineGround Actona Riverhead The Cisco Commitment to the Data Center

47 47 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Source of Relevant Resources Storage and Data Center Design Guidelines king_solutions_packages_list.html

48 48 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Phase 5: Interagency Infrastructure Sharing Remote Worker Branch Data Center Comprehensive Continuity Dense Wavelength- Division Multiplexing (DWDM) Network WAN IP WAN Data Center Web Servers Storage Consolidation Application Optimization Adaptive Threat Defensive Server Consolidation Enabling a Virtualized, Consolidated, and Automated Data Center VPN Headquarters

49 49 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Phase 5: Interagency Infrastructure Sharing Sharing Infrastructure and Applications Remaining Challenge:

50 50 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Enabling Information and Services Sharing Network Virtualization Creates a private, secure, and independent network over a shared physical infrastructure that is transparent to the end user, increasing utilization, efficiency, and flexibility of the network and the applications

51 51 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Virtualized services Centralized policies and services Shared infrastructure Employee Servers EmployeeContractorGuest Internet Network Virtualization Drivers Closed user groups Private Secure Independent policies (e.g., guests, Network Admission Control [NAC] quarantine) Remediation Servers

52 52 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Network Virtualization Requirements Create segments for guest access and NAC quarantine IT department as a “Network Service Provider” Provide a private network per group Use a shared infrastructure Scalability and simplicity Minimize operational overhead Centralize network security policies and access to shared services Closed user groups extensible over the WAN IT departments: From cost centers to revenue centers? Potential to enhance enterprise business processes

53 53 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Current Campus Design Recommendation Modular, hierarchical, and scalable yet not virtualized Internet L2 Layer 3 L2 Access Distribution Core

54 54 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public A Virtual Network per Group Virtualized devices Virtualized services Virtualized data paths

55 55 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Global VRF Virtualized Network Devices Switch Virtualization—VLANs Router Virtualization—VRFs Logical or physical interface (Layer 3) 802.1q or others 802.1q, GRE, line-state packet, physical interface, etc.

56 56 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Partners Contractors Resources Guests and NAC quarantine Campus Core Contractor 10.2/16 Resource 10.2/16 Contractor 10.3/16 Partner 10.2/16 Services not duplicated per group Economical Internet Gateway IPSec Gateway DHCP Video Server Firewall and NAT Hosted Content Shared for all groups: …With Centralized Services and Policies Efficient and manageable Policies centrally deployed Internet / Shared

57 57 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public 6 Phase 6: Interagency Information-Sharing and Shared Services Objective Final step of the Interagency Roadmap, with network helping connected government agencies extract full value in sharing human resources, information, and services (e.g., payroll, IT, and budgeting)

58 58 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Police Officer Police Station Data Center WAN DWDM Network IP WAN Data Center Web Servers Server Consolidation Phase 6: Interagency Information-Sharing and Shared Services—Cont’d Sharing Applications and Infrastructure Across Agency Boundaries VPN Police HQ 1 Justice Constituents Police

59 59 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Connected Government Is Based on Three Key Tenets of an Intelligent Information Network Providing resilience to maintain continuity and performance Adapting to changing needs of government programs Integrating network with applications and network components Connected Government The Cisco Approach for Connected Government

60 60 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Applying Cisco Connected Government to Public Safety Agencies

61 61 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Public Safety Agency Challenges Improve responsiveness and situational awareness Improve public safety Reduce administrative overhead Improve security of data systems Increase government agility by connecting all agencies Improve ability and capacity to deliver services through increased efficiency and effectiveness Protect investment Future-proof network

62 62 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Connected Government Benefits Public Safety Agencies Cisco helps public safety agencies Expand visibility, reach, and capabilities Cisco Connected Government Enhances operational efficiencies Improves response to emergency situations Provides greater control in safeguarding communities Increases safety and productivity in emergency and non-emergency situations Creates greater agility for information- sharing initiatives within and across organizations

63 63 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Putting Cisco Connected Government to Work Suspect in a stolen vehicle abducts a child Witnesses notify 999, providing a description of the vehicle Mobile command post established on scene Detectives obtain a photograph of the stolen vehicle from the owner; they also are able to identify the suspect and obtain a picture of the victim Pictures of the vehicle, suspect, and victim are shared with all local law- enforcement agencies Community alert system electronically distributes the information throughout the city and county Virtual command post uses videoconferencing and collaboration between emergency call taker, incident commander, and surrounding agencies to rapidly share information Suspect is located and the child is safely returned home

64 64 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Suspect and witness interviews received and correlated with crime databases—match with stolen vehicle and suspect Mobile operations at crime scene streams video and photo of suspect Detailed situation video, voice, and data distributed to local and regional responders, and alerts distributed to the public Local/Reg Police Stations Police Headquarters Data Center Mobile Command Center Cisco Connected Government: Public Safety Networking

65 65 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local/Reg Police Stations Police Headquarters WAN Prevent intrusion of secure wireless network (eg, rogue APs, war driving, and sniffing) Integrate wireless network into enterprise LAN management and control Maintain wireless connectivity during roaming, supporting delay-sensitive applications (e.g., RMS, CAD) WAN optimizes and secures traffic flow of applications Data Center Automatic network configuration that supports new and mobile offices Consistent security and segmentation that secures records, applies access policies, and meets regulatory requirements Collaboration Infrastructure Sharing Information Sharing Mobile Command Center Cisco Connected Government: Public Safety Networking

66 66 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Mapping Case Studies to the Phases of Cisco Connected Government

67 67 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Summary of Connected Government Case Studies Phase 1Phase 2Phase 3Phase 4Phase 5Phase 6 Kent Police X Humberside Police X Polish Border Guard X Upper Merion Police Department X State of Schleswig- Holstein X Dutch Victim Tracking System X izn in Lower Saxony, Germany X Austrian Federal Data Center X

68 68 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Kent Police—Phase 2 The Challenge Increase quality and speed of communications with community Modernize archaic, inefficient telephony system Meet pressures to deliver against Best Value performance targets The Solution Cisco IP WAN linking 50 locations around Kent Cisco IP telephony solution across the data network The Benefits Return on investment expected within four years Cost savings increased by more than 30 percent Improved communications with community Easier, efficient telephony use among staff

69 69 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Solutions are Priced for Success “As well as savings of more than 30 percent a year, the Cisco solution also gives us a more cost- effective and simpler way for us to expand our communications infrastructure to additional sites….Before, we would have been looking at an investment of around £30,000 to provide the necessary technology. With the Cisco IPT solution, it now costs us only a few thousand pounds.” Andy Barker Acting Head of Information Services Directorate Kent Police

70 70 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Humberside Police—Phase 2 The Challenge Deliver live video footage to specialist control center to provide complete picture of incidents Distribute video signal to several geographically- dispersed specialists The Solution Cisco IP/TV 3400 Series broadcast server to multicast live video images over Humberside Police’s intranet The Benefits Cost-effectively raised quality and quantity of information for improved incident evaluation and decision-making Already exceeded number of target users—with users being very satisfied Met scalability and flexibility requirements without bandwidth implications

71 71 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Polish Border Guard—Phase 2 The Challenge Enable secure database access to Shengen Information System Enable reliable telephone access across the organization Ensure voice and data access on top of telephone- cabling infrastructure The Solution Single, converged network infrastructure run as a managed service by Telekomunikacja Polska S.A. Cisco IP telephony solution across 300 sites with Cisco’s SRST Long-Range Ethernet to create high data rates across old cabling infrastructure The Benefits Significant savings on telephone expenses and administrative costs Reallocation of 800 people in support staff to core competency

72 72 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Upper Merion Police Department— Phase 3 The Challenge Replace antiquated records-management system with state-of-the-art system Deploy wireless network that enables officers to access new system directly from patrol cars The Solution Cisco Aironet wireless bridges and access points Video surveillance from Coban Technologies, a Cisco partner The Benefits Enabled field access to Internet, new RMS, mobile and field reporting system, and state’s online accident reporting system Streamlined administration Maximized situational awareness, visibility, and officer safety

73 73 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public “With the Cisco IP-based LMR interoperability solution, a dispatcher can patch two different departments together with a couple of keystrokes….It’s an incredible breakthrough.” Lieutenant Thomas Nolan of Upper Merion Police Department

74 74 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public State of Schleswig-Holstein—Phase 4 The Challenge Implement seven independent data networks with data ranges of up to 128k Deploy one outsourced (Deutsche Telekom) voice network operated as leased-line interconnection to connect 300 private branch exchanges (PBXs) Create more bandwidth to support Service Advertising Protocol implementation and police-tracing applications The Solution Outsourced voice-over-IP-trunking MPLS network on existing 2-Mbps access-leased lines of PBXs Cisco Core (7500, 7200), each access consisting of three routers, one managed MPLS-CE, one managed voice gateway, and one departmental data gateway with encryption The Benefits 30 times more bandwidth Centralized management of security and all data and voice operations Transfer of operational staff into core business

75 75 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Dutch Victim Tracking System—Phase 4 The Challenge Reduce unnecessary suffering of relatives Improve process of victim identification Improve reach and productivity of first-responders, city councils, and dispatch centers Improve resource-allocation (e.g., ambulances, hospitals, etc.) based on plans Improve process management based on real-time information available for all relevant organizations The Solution Cisco Intelligent Information Network with intelligent network services, including encryption, availability, and roaming WLAN Cisco 3200 Series mobile access router The Benefits Multiple applications and devices work together to enable greater first- responder productivity Standards-based, future-proof network lowers operational costs and improves administration efficiency Vehicles act as mobile hotspots to facilitate decision-making during emergencies Public and private networks combine to optimize availability and bandwidth

76 76 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public izn in Lower Saxony, Germany—Phase 5 The Challenge Increase data-storage facilities Decrease operating costs and standardize operations by consolidating multiple standalone storage networks with a single vendor Use IP-based technologies within the storage-area network (SAN) environment to offer more cost-effective services to government customers The Solution Cisco Business-Ready Data Center deployed across two separate data centers for resilience; each center has dualled Cisco MDS 9509 Multilayer Director SAN switches using virtual SAN technology for customer data separation Data center is accessible via WAN MPLS backbone known as iznNet, which connects 2200 locations across Lower Saxony The Benefits Reduced overhead costs through virtualization of SAN facilities and single platform management Optimized availability of network, resulting in improved service effectiveness IP-based protocols allow lower-cost service options, enabling introduction of price-differentiated services to match different classes of data

77 77 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public “The Cisco Business-Ready Data Center model provides a high level of robustness which other suppliers still have to achieve.” Herr Erik Krex, Operations and Planning for izn Data Center

78 78 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Austrian Federal Data Center—Phase 5 The Challenge Implement ELAK, an electronic filing system, to ensure a secure, resilient network for Austrian ministries and federal administration The Solution Cisco Catalyst 6500 Series switches provide resilience and security while supporting network core Cisco Catalyst 3550 Series switch and Cisco 7200 Series core router connected to all ministries Cisco VPN 3000 Series concentrators Cisco PIX 525 security appliances Dualled Cisco 7200 Series routers linked to data center The Benefits Secure, high-performance network expedites access to data and enables cooperative electronic workflows— improving efficiency by 10 to 15 percent 99.7-percent network availability helps move agency toward paperless government system

79 79 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Prowess Means Project Progress “Cisco has performed very well, particularly in areas of critical importance to the project, such as the design and implementation of the metropolitan-area network, the data center, and redundancy, as well as firewalls and content switching.” Herr Kurt Fleck Project Leader of ELAK Austrian Federal Data Center

80 80 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Why Cisco?

81 81 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Setting Cisco Apart from the Rest Unmatched technical expertise Unrivaled partnerships Industry-leading, interoperable, standards-based solutions Enabler of responsive environment that outpaces changing demands Cisco Capital finance programs

82 82 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Connected Government— a Networking Approach Built to Last Modular Network Deployment Based on Integrated Components Cisco Provides a Highly Adaptable Network Architecture that Allows Public Administrators to Meet Current and Future Needs Highly Customized Design Based on Proven Best Practices Optimal Performance Continuously Expanding Functionality Future-proofed Roadmap

83 83 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public How Cisco Helps Your Agency Become a Connected Government Cisco solutions demonstrate how to apply previous success in a connected government through: Assessment tools to create Connected Government network roadmap Reference architectures that represent Cisco best practices developed from real-world deployments Cisco and partner services that coordinate government processes to coincide with technical capabilities Align incentives, policy, performance management, rewards, and funding to encourage services sharing

84 84 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public First Assess, Then Progress—The Connected Government Network Assessment Tool Translates into Possible resiliency issues in the network may be compromising important capabilities: Public notice for emergencies Internal workflow management Budget management Geographic information systems (GIS) Dispatch systems Field worker communication Internal communications Tells You

85 85 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public City of Bremen—How Assessments Help The Challenge Adopt governance initiatives that help provide service- level agreements across multigovernmental departments Deliver multimedia services to public body’s surrounding communities Reduce IT operating costs The Solution Cisco and Brekom assessment—IPT Readiness Foundation Review Multiservice IP Campus Backbone (WAN and LAN) The Benefits Significant savings on service platforms through standardized LAN and recentralizing of consolidated LAN structure 20-percent savings in network operations 38-percent savings in IT headcount Increased focus on government affairs

86 86 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Provides Clear Path to Goals “Cisco presented us with a very clear and solid solution….The very strong relationship we had with Cisco was key, in particular with obtaining WAN/LAN. Cisco clearly stood out above the other 10 providers for the new campus solution. We could never have envisaged all these core benefits which have alleviated the strain on IT resources, so we can now become more focused on developing additional services for the City of Bremen.” Dr. Norbert Schulz CEO Brekom

87 87 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Government Leasing Single monthly payment Single financing contract Ease of administration Bundled products and services Below commercial-market rates Cost-effective, comprehensive solution

88 88 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Government Leasing Products Lease to Ownership Plan Installment purchase plan—uses capital funds Purchase title passes upon final payment Lease With Option to Own Operating lease with option to own—lease payments with fixed purchase option buyout, or fair market value Uses operations and maintenance funds annually End-of-term options—return, renew, buyout, upgrade Technology-refresh upgrade before or at end of term

89 89 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public The Road Forward Compare department mission and strategy with IT capabilities Baseline current IT capabilities Define IT capabilities and mission objectives gap Develop phased IT roadmap that includes network and application capabilities to close the gap Coordinate process and policy change with IT investment plan to match technical, political, and organizational capability

90 90 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Discussion

91 91 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public


Download ppt "1 © 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Session Number Presentation_ID Cisco Public Cisco Connected Government Technical Overview October 2005."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google