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JAW Managing a Multiple School FRC Team 2005 FRC Conference John Larock - MOE 365 Kathie Kentfield - RAGE 173.

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Presentation on theme: "JAW Managing a Multiple School FRC Team 2005 FRC Conference John Larock - MOE 365 Kathie Kentfield - RAGE 173."— Presentation transcript:

1 JAW Managing a Multiple School FRC Team 2005 FRC Conference John Larock - MOE 365 Kathie Kentfield - RAGE 173

2 2 Agenda Why A Multi-School Team? Pros & Cons of a Multi-School Team Existing Multi-School Models in FIRST –RAGE 173 –CHUCK 84 –MOE 365 Special Issues With Multi-School Teams Q & A - Open Discussion

3 3 Why A Multi-School Team? Traditional FRC is reaching a plateau of growth Large corporate sponsors providing support are becoming saturated More difficulty finding committed mentors to enable growth of new FIRST teams Team sustainability might rely on combining existing teams or creating teams consisting of multiple schools Going forward, the “Traditional” FIRST team may not be the best model for sustainability due to the current FIRST cost structure, difficulty in finding committed mentors, and saturation of sponsors.

4 4 PROs of a Multi-School Team Geographic Reach –Extends geographic area for potential sponsors –Can spread FIRST program into new areas –Gets as many students involved as possible –Use of wider range of facilities Community Building –Brings communities together –“Our team” versus “my school” –Eliminates school stereotypes Diversity –Ideas / people –Opportunity for mentors and students to meet new people –Can expand mentor base

5 5 PROs of a Multi-School Team Team Sustainability –Older teams that cannot sustain can join with other teams –Allows a team to exist Potential exists for better media coverage

6 6 CONs of a Multi-School Team Equality –# students –Finances / resources –Recognition Travel / Distance –Difficult for some to travel to central location - GAS $$ Most convenient to meet at night during week Recruiting –Separate build location reduces exposure to other students –Difficulty recruiting Differing socioeconomic backgrounds might have some students better able to afford to participate in team than others Communication more difficult

7 7 CONs of a Multi-School Team Different School Schedules (impact team meetings/events) –Awards nights –Graduations –Dances, proms, other events Recognition –Who gets trophies to display? –Which high schools get put into TIMS system? –All names don’t fit on the T-shirts? Special School Issues –Dealing with multiple school boards –Not having teachers from all schools involved –Difficult for school to support - “not a school thing” –“Us” versus “Them” –Charges of favoritism / bias

8 8 Existing Multi-School Models in FIRST Co-affiliation with two schools –RAGE 173 Co-affiliation with more than two schools –Chuck 84 No affiliation with specific schools, separate organization –MOE 365 Affiliation with a School District, not a school –Toltechs, Team 499 Others?

9 9 School Affiliation - 2 Schools Two typical model breakdowns

10 10 RAGE 173 Number of students on team each season (average) –30 Number of schools involved each season (average) –2 main high schools; additional schools vary Student team member requirements –No team-issued GPA / grade requirements –Attendance / participation (community service encouraged) –Team fundraisers required; optional personal fundraisers –Several mandatory team meetings / clean-up days each year Basic structure –Affiliated with two schools; teacher liaison is required by schools –Strong partnerships with corporate sponsors –Student-led committee structure with elected officers and school liaisons Connection with High Schools / School Boards –Presents several times/year with 2 school boards; communicates in- between via s and newsletter –Moderate success in engaging schools

11 11 FIRST School Affiliated Teams (2 Schools)

12 12 School Affiliation - 3+ Schools Two typical model breakdowns

13 13 CHUCK 84 Number of students on team each season (average) –15-30 Number of schools involved each season (average) –4-6 (from several different communities) Student team member requirements –Set by schools –Attendance / participation –Adhere to requirements, expectations, and consequences policies Basic structure –Teacher or other school liaison with each school required –Set-up as a school affiliated activity Connection with High Schools / School Boards –Annual presentations to schools –Annual status update with school administration

14 14 FIRST School Affiliated Teams (3+ Schools)

15 15 Non-school Affiliation Team No School District

16 16 MOE 365 Number of students on team each season (average) –30-35 Number of schools involved each season (average) –12-14 Student team member requirements –No GPA / grade requirements –Attendance / participation / community service / sponsorship Basic structure –Non-school affiliated –501 c3 non-profit organization [First State Robotics, Inc.] –Set-up as a non-school affiliated after-school club Connection with High Schools / School Boards –Minimal interaction –Annual status update with certain school boards

17 17 FIRST Non-School Affiliated Teams

18 18 School District Affiliation Team School District

19 19 FIRST School District Affiliated Teams

20 20 Special Considerations with Multi-School Teams Equality / Fairness –Funding / financials / support –Participants (students / mentors) –Facilities –Recognition Developing Team Member Relationships –Mentors with students –Students with other students Recruitment of Students How do you recruit students from multiple schools? Identifying a Common Work Location –Neutral location or one affiliated with a specific school? –Travel issues? Turf issues?

21 21 Special Considerations with Multi-School Teams Maintaining Effective Communication –with team members website phone hotline –with schools where student team members reside newsletters targeted distribution lists website meetings School Recognition –who displays the awards –how is team recognized in media articles (newspaper, tv)

22 22 Special Considerations with Multiple School Teams Administrative Concerns –differing school requirements for student team members how to handle? –require common set of requirements and negotiation with schools to reach agreement Keeping up with School’s Policies –travel requirements –school board connections –chaperone approval / ratio –days off, school events, etc. Who owns your robot?

23 JAW Q & A Open Discussion

24 JAW Multiple School FIRST Teams ROCK!

25 JAW Presenter Contact Information John Larock (Team 365) Kathie Kentfield (Team Judy Vanderpool (Team


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