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West Virginia Achieves Professional Development Series Volume XVII Integration of Writing to Inform, Vocabulary Development and Reading to Learn Strategies.

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Presentation on theme: "West Virginia Achieves Professional Development Series Volume XVII Integration of Writing to Inform, Vocabulary Development and Reading to Learn Strategies."— Presentation transcript:

1 West Virginia Achieves Professional Development Series Volume XVII Integration of Writing to Inform, Vocabulary Development and Reading to Learn Strategies

2 West Virginia Department of Education Mission The West Virginia Department of Education, in construction with the Regional Education Service Agencies and the Office of Performance Audits, will create systemic conditions, processes and structures within the West Virginia public school system that result in (1) all students achieving mastery and beyond and (2) closing the achievement gap among sub-groups of the student population.

3 Robert Hutchins The Conflict in Education in a Democratic Society “Perhaps the greatest idea that America has given the world is education for all. The world is entitled to know whether this idea means that everybody can be educated or simply that everyone must go to school.”

4  An emerging body of research identifies characteristics of high performing school systems.  These school systems have made significant progress in bringing all students to mastery and in closing the achievement gap.  These systems share characteristics described in The West Virginia Framework for High Performing School Systems. What We Know…

5 SCHOOL EFFECTIVENESS CULTURE OF COMMON BELIEFS & VALUES Dedicated to “Learning for ALL…Whatever It Takes” HIGH PERFORMING SCHOOL SYSTEM SYSTEMIC CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PROCESS CURRICULLUM MANAGEMENT INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES STUDENT/PARENT SUPPORT

6 WVDE WRITING TO INFORM COMMITTEE Terry Reale, chairperson Office of Instructional Services Keith Burdette Office of Program Services Nathan Estel Office of Professional Preparation Lynn Nehoda Office of Child Nutrition Jim Parker Office of Special Education Catherine Thompson Office of Instructional Services

7 The Commission on Adolescent Literacy of the International Reading Association “Adolescents entering the adult world in the 21 st century will read and write more than at any other time in human history. They will need advanced levels of literacy ….Their ability to read will be crucial. Continual instruction beyond the early grades is needed.” Moore, Bean, Birdyshaw & Rycik, 1999, p. 3

8 High Performing School Systems Many school systems across the country have made significant progress in assisting students to achieve at mastery and beyond. These schools systems share many common characteristics. One of these common characteristics is district wide implementation of the integration of reading to learn and writing to inform in all content areas across all grade levels.

9 INSTRUCTION PILLAR To assure that each classroom teacher utilizes research-based instructional design, management, delivery and assessment that results in highly engaged students who master the essential curriculum.

10 High Yield Strategy Integration of writing to inform, vocabulary development and reading to learn strategies in all classrooms in all content areas.

11 ESSENTIAL QUESTION How does the integration of writing to inform, comprehension and vocabulary development in all content areas improve student achievement across all grade levels?

12 Agree-Disagree Activity Each participant will read and complete the agree/disagree worksheet. In small groups discuss the individual responses. Each group should choose a spokesperson to share ideas about the statements.

13 STATEMENT AGREEDISAGREE We are not all reading teachers, but we are all teachers of reading. Critical reading requires thoughtful analysis. The brain learns to speak spontaneously. The brain is hard-wired to read. Students should learn vocabulary within the subject matter content. Informational text requires different reading skills than fictional pieces. Once children learn to read in the early grades, there are no other reading skills to be taught. Children enter school with extremely different vocabulary backgrounds. Teaching comprehension strategies is unnecessary for older students. The writing process is critical knowledge for all age levels.

14 Walking Through the Learning Packet Table of contents Format Using with a Study Group Introduction and Rationale Segment 1: High Priorities in All Content Areas Segment 2: Integration of Writing to Inform in All Content Areas Segment 3: Reading to Learn Strategies in All Content Areas Segment 4: Vocabulary Development in All Content Areas Appendix: Facilitator Notes

15 Segment 1: High Priorities in All Content Areas Essential Question: Why should a district place a high priority on writing to learn, reading to learn and vocabulary development in all content areas across all grade levels? Components: Two readings and activity

16 Read and Share Activity Divide into three groups and read one of the following: –Group 1: Research-Based Content Area Reading Instruction, pages –Group 2: Research-Based Content Area Reading Instruction, pages –Group 3: Seven Literacy Strategies That Work, pages Each group will present the main ideas of the reading.

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18 “Don’t write merely to be understood. Write so that you cannot possibly be misunderstood.” Robert Louis Stevenson

19 Segment 2: Writing to Inform How does writing improve overall student achievement? How can the implementation of a district- wide rubric improve students’ writing ability? What is the impact of writing on the reading level of all students? Components: Three readings and activity

20 Graphically Organized Writing Divide into three groups and read one of the following: –Group 1: The Neglected “R”, pages –Group 2: Writing First!, pages –Group 3: The Writing Rubric, pages Each group will complete the appropriate section of the graphic organizer and share their ideas with the entire group. Groups will use the ideas of other group members to complete their own graphic organizer. Each group will use this information to draft a paragraph.

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23 Hear the Cry of the Secondary Content Teacher “You want me to teach reading? But I'm a content teacher. I don't have time to stop and teach reading. Besides, I wouldn't even know how to begin.” Vicki Jacobs from the Harvard Education Letter article, “What Secondary Teachers Can Do To Teach Reading” July-August, 1999.

24 Segment 3: Reading to Learn Strategies in All Content Areas Why should content area teachers, concerned with state and national standards, provide instruction in reading comprehension? How do schools help all students become strategic readers? Components: Three readings and activity

25 Activating Prior Knowledge If most of the instruments measuring student mastery of content rely on the ability to comprehend readings and questions, then improving comprehension should …

26 Read and Share Activity Break into two groups. –Group 1: RAND Report on Reading Comprehension and Report of the National Reading Panel: Teaching Children to Read, pages –Group 2: Comprehension Instruction: What Makes Sense Now, pages List reading comprehension strategies. Share with the large group.

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28 Vocabulary knowledge is fundamental to reading comprehension: one cannot understand text without knowing what most of the words mean. Nagy, 1988

29 Segment 4: Vocabulary Development in All Content Areas How can vocabulary instruction lessen the achievement gap? What are best practices in vocabulary instruction? Components: Three readings and activity

30 Key Points Provide each participant with the Key Points activity sheet. Divide into groups of three with each member selecting an article to review. While reading, record key ideas that would provide assistance in responding to the essential questions. When all participants have completed the activity sheet, use these key ideas for a summative discussion.

31 WVDE Technical Assistance NAMEOFFICE Terry Reale, ChairOffice of Instructional Services Keith BurdetteOffice of Program Services Nathan EstelOffice of Professional Preparation Lynn NehodaOffice of Child Nutrition Jim ParkerOffice of Special Education Catherine ThompsonOffice of Instructional Services

32 The Premise and the Promise “It is now well accepted that the chief cause of the achievement gap between socioeconomic groups is the language gap.”Hirsch, 2003 The Promise of “No Child Left Behind” and our promise to the students are to continuously work to close this achievement gap. Writing to Inform Committee, 2004


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