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ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Unit 5 The New Nation The New Nation What causes a society to grow? ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic.

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Presentation on theme: "ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Unit 5 The New Nation The New Nation What causes a society to grow? ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic."— Presentation transcript:

1 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Unit 5 The New Nation The New Nation What causes a society to grow? ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer

2 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Lessons ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Lesson 1 Planning a Government Lesson 2 United States Constitution Lesson 3 The Louisiana Purchase Lesson 4 The War of 1812 Lesson 5 The Industrial Revolution Lesson 6 The Age of Andrew Jackson Lesson 7 Texas and the War with Mexico

3 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Planning a New Government What problems did the government face after the Revolution? Lesson 1 Vocabulary Articles of Confederation arsenal legislature Reading Skill Draw Conclusions

4 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Planning a New Government What were the Articles of Confederation and why did they fail? They were the first plan of government for the U.S. They failed because each state was independent. printed their own money passed their own trade laws. What was the importance of the Northwest Ordinance? It said that an area became a territory when its population reached 5,000. A territory could apply for statehood when the population reached 60,000.

5 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Planning a New Government Why was Shays’s Rebellion important? It showed the Articles of Confederation had failed. The new government could not protect farmers from losing their lands. It also could not afford to send troops to stop the uprising.

6 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Planning a New Government The Virginia Plan Proposed by James Madison Create a national legislature with two houses: One elected by citizens based on a state’s population One composed of members chosen by the first house The Great Compromise Proposed by Roger Sherman A legislature with a House of Representatives based on a state’s population A Senate with two senators from each state

7 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Planning a New Government What was the Three-Fifths Compromise and why was it proposed? It was an agreement among the delegates that every five enslaved people counted as three free people. The slave states would not gain too much voting power in the legislature.

8 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer United States Constitution What are important points to remember about the Constitution? Lesson 2 Vocabulary federal system Supreme Court ratify bill of rights amendment Reading Skill Draw Conclusions

9 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer United States Constitution First three articles explain how the U.S. government is organized. Article 1 – establishes a legislature called Congress made up of a Senate and a House of Representatives power to make laws Article 2 – creates the office of the President leader of the executive branch power to enforce laws Article 3 – establishes a Supreme Court highest court in the land power to decide whether any law works against the Constitution

10 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer United States Constitution What is the Bill of Rights? It is a statement of rights guaranteed by the government to the people. Consists of ten amendments written by James Madison After addition of Bill of Rights, all original thirteen states ratified the Constitution. U.S. Constitution has 17 additional amendments. Amendments must be approved by two-thirds of the House and Senate and then by three-fourths of the states.

11 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer United States Constitution System of Checks and Balances The system of keeping one branch from gaining too much power Legislative branch: checks between the two houses House of Representatives and Senate must agree. Executive branch: President must sign a law power to veto Congress can override Judicial branch Supreme Court has power to declare a law unconstitutional. judicial review

12 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer The Louisiana Purchase How did the United States expand across North America? Lesson 3 Vocabulary pioneer impressment Reading Skill Draw Conclusions

13 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer The Louisiana Purchase What were the effects of the Louisiana Purchase? Jefferson doubled the size of the U.S. for pennies an acre. Americans gained access to a major port. The land had abundant natural resources.

14 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer The War of 1812 How did the War of 1812 affect Americans? Lesson 4 Vocabulary War Hawks Era of Good Feelings Adams-Onís Treaty Monroe Doctrine Reading Skill Draw Conclusions

15 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer The War of 1812 Why did the War Hawks want war with Great Britain? Believed that they could conquer Canada and take control of whole continent Angry that British had helped Native Americans Wanted to protect American sailors from British impressment Why did the British burn Washington, D.C.? The British wanted to punish Americans for burning York.

16 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer The War of 1812 What was the Monroe Doctrine? The U.S. would not give Europeans the power to establish new colonies in the Americas. The U.S. would not interfere with existing colonies in the Americas or with European affairs. Why did the U.S. want to prevent new European colonies in the Americas? The U.S. wanted to be free from European influence.

17 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer How did the Industrial Revolution change people’s lives? The Industrial Revolution Lesson 5 Vocabulary Industrial Revolution cotton gin interchangeable part reaper steam engine Reading Skill Draw Conclusions

18 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer The Industrial Revolution What was the Industrial Revolution? It was a time when new machines and new ideas changed the way people worked, traveled, and lived. Cotton gin Power looms in textile mills Interchangeable parts Mechanical plow and reaper Steam Engine Erie Canal The Iron Horse Write About It! Explain how the Erie Canal helped New York grow.

19 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer How did the United States change during Andrew Jackson’s term? The Age of Andrew Jackson Lesson 6 Vocabulary Union Trail of Tears manifest destiny wagon train discrimination Reading Skill Draw Conclusions

20 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer The Age of Andrew Jackson Why did people move west? Start new lives Find open land Become wealthy Forced to move away The Indian Removal Act of 1831 Native Americans had to move Indian Territory Army forced Cherokee to march 800 miles Trail of Tears Oregon Fever Manifest Destiny wagon trains

21 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Text Clues Conclusion The Age of Andrew Jackson Use clues from the text to make conclusions about the treatment of the Cherokee people. The Cherokee’s right to their land was guaranteed by treaty. Jackson ignored a court ruling that the Cherokee should stay in Georgia. About 4,000 Cherokee died on the Trail of Tears. Forcing the Cherokee to move was unjust and illegal.

22 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer How did conflicts with Mexico change the United States? Texas and the War with Mexico Lesson 7 Vocabulary Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo Gold Rush Reading Skill Draw Conclusions

23 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Texas and the War with Mexico Trouble in Texas By 1835, 25,000 Americans settled in Mexico. Disliked Mexican laws Texans attacked San Antonio. Took control of the Alamo Santa Anna, leader of Mexico, recaptured the Alamo. All Americans killed. General Sam Houston defeated Santa Anna. “Remember the Alamo!” Write About It! Explain why both the United States and Mexico claimed Texas.

24 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Texas and the War with Mexico Use clues from the text to make conclusions about the Mexican War. Text CluesConclusions Mexico wanted to keep its western territories. President Polk tried to buy land from Mexico. After President Polk sent troops to the Rio Grande, fighting broke out. When Texas became a state, Mexico still considered it part of its territory. After the war, the United States purchased most of its western states from Mexico. The war cost over 60,000 lives. Possible Conclusions: The United States was the aggressor in the war. The Mexican War helped the U.S. grow at a great cost. The U.S. was becoming a powerful nation.

25 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Texas and the War with Mexico The California Gold Rush 1848: James Marshall discovered gold in California. Thousands of miners prospected for gold. So many people came searching for wealth, that it became known as the “Gold Rush.” 1849: more than 80,000 people. “Forty-niners” 1850: California became 31st state.

26 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Review What are the three branches of government and what does each branch do? Executive branch – enforces laws Legislative branch – makes laws Judicial branch – decides if laws are constitutional What is the Bill of Rights? The Bill of Rights is a statement of rights guaranteed by the government to the people. Why is there a system of checks and balances under the Constitution? Checks and balances keep any one branch from gaining too much power.

27 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Review What were some important inventions during the Industrial Revolution? – removed seed from cotton and made cotton the most important cash crop in the South – made the process of cloth making much faster and large textile mills employed many people – pieces made in standard sizes meant products could be made faster and at a lower cost – made farming easier and fewer farmers were needed – produced more power than horses and could pull heavier loads – connected Lake Erie to the Hudson River with a series of locks to raise and lower the water level – railroads became the main form of transportation Cotton Gin Power loom Interchangeable parts Mechanical plow and reaper Steam engine Erie Canal Iron Horse

28 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Review What is manifest destiny? Manifest destiny is the belief that the United States had a right to expand its borders and claim new lands. What was the Trail of Tears? The Trail of Tears was the 800-mile westward march of the Cherokee people to the Indian Territory; 4,000 people died along the way.

29 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Maps Click on a map to enlarge the view.

30 ReviewLessonsMapsGraphic OrganizerMapsGraphic Organizer Draw Conclusions Click on the graphic organizer to enlarge the view and enter content.


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