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SS8H1 The student will evaluate the development of Native American cultures and the impact of European exploration and settlement on the Native American.

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Presentation on theme: "SS8H1 The student will evaluate the development of Native American cultures and the impact of European exploration and settlement on the Native American."— Presentation transcript:

1 SS8H1 The student will evaluate the development of Native American cultures and the impact of European exploration and settlement on the Native American cultures in Georgia. Concepts: Individuals – Groups – Institutions Technological Innovation

2 The student will understand that the actions of Individuals, Groups, and Institutions affect society through intended and unintended consequences. What are some groups in your school, community, or state? How are the Paleo, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian cultures similar to one another? How are they different? Individuals – Groups - Institutions

3 The student will understand that technological innovations have consequences, both intended and unintended. What are some inventions that have helped society, but also hurt society? What inventions allowed the Mississippian culture to become more populated than the Paleo, Archaic, and Woodland cultures? Technological Innovation

4 SS8H1a Describe the evolution of Native American cultures (Paleo, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian) prior to European contact. Concepts: Individuals – Groups – Institutions Technological Innovation

5 The Prehistoric Period PALEO - INDIANS PAGE 6 IN GEORGIA JOURNAL ESSENTIAL QUESTION WHO WERE THE PALEO INDIANS?

6 PALEO LOCATIONMOVEMENT TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION INDIVIDUALS GROUPS INSTITUTIONS

7 PALEO PERIOD Before Europeans came to Georgia, prehistoric Native Americans experienced four stages of cultural development, or traditions. Anthropologists call the first tradition the Paleo Indian period. They are the first because they were the first group of people to inhabit North America by crossing the Beringia land bridge during the Ice Age from Asia (where the Bering Strait is today) as long ago as 10,000 BCE. Paleo means "ancient or very old”, and the Paleo Indians were so ancient that we know little about them. We do know that they got what they needed to survive from nature. Paleo Indians hunted animals that are extinct today, such as giant bison and elephant-like mastodons. Hunting provided meat food, bones for tools, and skins for clothing and blankets. They also ate wild fruits and vegetables. Stones were used as tools and shaped into spearheads. Paleo Indians did not build permanent homes because they were nomadic. They moved around in bands, or groups of about twenty, in search of food. Very little of Paleo- Indian civilization has survived. The only artifacts that archeologists have found are stone spearheads like the clovis point and a few other tools such as the atlatl, a sling like device used to throw spears.

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9 EARLY PALEO SHELTERS

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11 PALEO INDIAN STONE POINTS

12 PALEO SPEAR POINT

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14 PALEO / ARCHAIC ATLATL SPEAR

15 PALEO PERIOD HUNTING THE WOOLY MAMMOTH

16 THE PALEO HUNT

17 PALEO FOOD

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19 SS8H1a Describe the evolution of Native American cultures (Paleo, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian) prior to European contact. Concepts: Individuals – Groups – Institutions Technological Innovation

20 The Prehistoric Period ARCHAIC - PERIOD PAGE 7 IN GEORGIA JOURNAL ESSENTIAL QUESTION SS8H1a WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE ARCHAIC PERIOD?

21 ARCHAIC LOCATIONMOVEMENT TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION INDIVIDUALS GROUPS INSTITUTIONS

22 ARCHAIC PERIOD The second tradition of Georgia's prehistoric people was the Archaic Indian period. Around 8,000 BCE, the earth began to get warmer. The animals Paleo Indians hunted disappeared due to climate change or overhunting. Archaic Native Americans hunted smaller animals, such as deer and rabbits. To make hunting easier, they burned down trees to create clearings that attracted animals. Archaic Indians differed from Paleo Indians in other ways as well. They ate a wider range of foods, including nuts and shellfish. They left large piles of shells, called middens, near the coast. Perhaps their biggest innovation was making pottery from clay. This suggests that they moved around less than their ancestors, since it would be hard to travel with many clay pots, however, they were still nomadic as they did not live in permanent villages, but instead moved during each season. Another common artifact from the period is the stone axe used to clear forests and plant seeds for crops. This was the early stage of horticulture that would become more advanced in the Woodland and Mississippian periods.

23 ARCHAIC SHELTERS

24 ARCHAIC FOOD

25 ARCHAIC TOOLS

26 ARCHAIC WEAPONS

27 ARCHAIC ATLATL HUNTS

28 ARCHAIC FEAST

29 SS8H1a Describe the evolution of Native American cultures (Paleo, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian) prior to European contact. Concepts: Individuals – Groups – Institutions Technological Innovation

30 The Prehistoric Period WOODLAND - PERIOD PAGE 8 IN GEORGIA JOURNAL ESSENTIAL QUESTION SS8H1a WHAT IS UNIQUE ABOUT THE WOODLAND INDIAN PERIOD?

31 WOODLAND LOCATIONMOVEMENT TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION INDIVIDUALS GROUPS INSTITUTIONS

32 WOODLAND PERIOD The third tradition of Georgia's prehistoric people was the Woodland Indian period. This period began around 1000 B.C. and lasted some two thousand years. Unlike their ancestors, Woodland Native Americans were not as nomadic. They built villages, with houses meant to last. They also developed agriculture. Woodland people cleared fields and planted seeds, growing corn and beans. Woodland hunters began using bows and arrows. Because of these changes, they had a bigger food supply than earlier Native Americans, so the population grew and tribes formed. Woodland Native Americans began forming tribes, large groups of people with similar languages and religions led by chiefs. They also began to build mounds of earth and stone, in different sizes and shapes. Some mounds were parts of villages; others were religious or burial sites. Examples of Woodland period mounds are Rock Eagle and the Kolomoki mounds. These mounds suggests that the Woodland Indians used religious ceremonies to honor their dead and believed in an after-life because of the items buried in the mounds.

33 WOODLAND TOOLS

34 WOODLAND HUNTING TOOLS

35 CLAY POTTERY

36 WOODLAND COOKING

37 WOODLAND HOMES

38 ROCK EAGLE

39 SS8H1a Describe the evolution of Native American cultures (Paleo, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian) prior to European contact. Concepts: Individuals – Groups – Institutions Technological Innovation

40 The Prehistoric Period MISSISSIPPIAN - PERIOD PAGE 9 IN GEORGIA JOURNAL ESSENTIAL QUESTION SS8H1a HOW IS THE MISSISSIPPIAN CULTURE DIFFERENT THAN THE OTHERS?

41 MISSISSIPPIAN LOCATIONMOVEMENT TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION INDIVIDUALS GROUPS INSTITUTIONS

42 MISSISSIPPIAN PERIOD The fourth prehistoric tradition, the Mississippian Indian period, began around A.D.700. Mississippians relied on agriculture even more than their ancestors and celebrated during the Green Corn Festival. They also raised livestock. With more food, the Native American population increased further. As a result, Mississippians built permanent villages. Many villages had public squares and protective outer walls known as a palisade. Houses were usually made of wood and clay, a method called wattle and daub. Mississippians even built cities. Tribes grew larger in the Mississippian period. Two tribes in Georgia were the Creek and later the Cherokee. As the tribes grew, a chiefdom had one leader and might cover many villages. Within tribes, groups of relatives formed clans. Both Creek and Cherokee tribes were matrilineal (ancestry traced through mother’s side of family). We know more about the Mississippians than about their ancestors because they left behind more artifacts. We know that villages and tribes from as far away as the Great Plains, Mexico, and Guatemala traded with each other. Artifacts such as pipes and jewelry show that the Mississippians were religious and artistic. Mississippians left behind many flat top mounds. On top of the mounds were buildings, used as houses or temples. The mounds were also burial sites, holding shell and copper artifacts. Many mounds still stand in Georgia, including the Etowah Indian mounds in nearby Cartersville. This period was the high point of prehistoric civilization in Georgia. When Europeans arrived in the 1500s, the germs they brought killed many Native Americans.

43 MISSISSIPPIAN MOUNDS

44 MISSISSIPPIAN VILLAGES

45 MISSISSIPPIAN FARMING

46 MISSISSIPPIAN ART


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