Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chapter Four The English Colonies in the Eighteenth Century, 1689-1763.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chapter Four The English Colonies in the Eighteenth Century, 1689-1763."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter Four The English Colonies in the Eighteenth Century,

2 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-2 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 The economies of most of the English colonies revolved around 1. fisheries. 2. manufacturing. 3. agriculture. 4. mining.

3 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-3 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 The economies of most of the English colonies revolved around 3. agriculture. Hint: South Carolina and Georgia produced rice and indigo, the Chesapeake colonies grew tobacco, and the middle colonies produced wheat. See pages 89–92.

4 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-4 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 Backcountry regions throughout colonial North America 1. produced large crops for export to England. 2. traded extensively with New France. 3. had a low-level, subsistence economy. 4. produced precious metals in competition with the gold and silver mines of Spanish America.

5 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-5 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 Backcountry regions throughout colonial North America 3. had a low-level, subsistence economy. Hint: From north to south, the frontier region produced just enough for survival. See page 90.

6 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-6 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 In New England during the eighteenth century, 1. scarce land impelled many to move farther west or to commercial centers in the region. 2. slavery increased dramatically in importance. 3. farming declined in favor of the logging industry. 4. a surge of new immigration depressed labor costs.

7 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-7 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 In New England during the eighteenth century, 1. scarce land impelled many to move farther west or to commercial centers in the region. Hint: See pages 92–93.

8 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-8 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 Slavery increased in the South after 1680 because 1. fear of slave rebellions dramatically declined. 2. the supply of indentured servants fell off. 3. French slave companies aggressively marketed more Africans. 4. Virginia shifted from subsistence agriculture to tobacco growing.

9 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-9 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 Slavery increased in the South after 1680 because 2. the supply of indentured servants fell off. Hint: See pages 94–97.

10 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-10 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 Few cities developed in the Chesapeake region because 1. it was a depressed, poverty-stricken area. 2. legislation there imposed high taxes on urban development. 3. it was too cold. 4. merchants did not settle there.

11 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-11 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 Few cities developed in the Chesapeake region because 4. merchants did not settle there. Hint: See pages 98–99.

12 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-12 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 It was easier for slaves in the Lower South to develop their own culture than those in the Chesapeake because 1. their owners encouraged it. 2. they were concentrated in large numbers on plantations. 3. they were healthier. 4. All of these

13 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-13 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 It was easier for slaves in the Lower South to develop their own culture than those in the Chesapeake because 2. they were concentrated in large numbers on plantations. Hint: Living in very small isolated groups, they were too few in number to form a distinctive culture. See page 96.

14 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-14 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 The Stono Rebellion in was a revolt by indentured servants. 2. pitted a planter aristocracy against backcountry farmers. 3. never actually happened and is just myth. 4. convinced southern whites that the possibility of slave uprisings existed.

15 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-15 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 The Stono Rebellion in convinced southern whites that the possibility of slave uprisings existed. Hint: This uprising resulted in actual deaths among white settlers. See pages 99–100.

16 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-16 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 The Middle Colonies were well- known for 1. the lack of conflict with the backcountry. 2. disinterest in the theories of John Locke. 3. escaping harm in the French and Indian War. 4. the dynamic urban life of New York City and Philadelphia.

17 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-17 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 The Middle Colonies were well- known for 4. the dynamic urban life of New York City and Philadelphia. Hint: See pages 95–98.

18 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-18 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 According to social contract theory, 1. business contracts can always be altered if both parties agree. 2. people have a right to rebel if the government violates their natural rights. 3. a monarch has a contract with God to rule on earth. 4. government should provide social services for a community's citizens.

19 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-19 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 According to social contract theory, 2. people have a right to rebel if the government violates their natural rights. Hint: Social contract theory justified revolution. See page 102.

20 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-20 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 A wonderful power was in the room and with one accord they began to cry out and weep most bitterly for the space of half an hour. Some of the people were... crying to God for mercy. This quotation is a description of a Great Awakening sermon preached by a(n) 1. Old Side Congregationalist. 2. Old Side Presbyterian. 3. Methodist. 4. deist.

21 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.4-21 Berkin, Making America Chapter 4 A wonderful power was in the room and with one accord they began to cry out and weep most bitterly for the space of half an hour. Some of the people were... crying to God for mercy. This quotation is a description of a Great Awakening sermon preached by a(n) 3. Methodist. Hint: The quotation describes the passion associated with the Great Awakening, and George Whitefield was one of the leading preachers of that movement. See pages 102–104.


Download ppt "Chapter Four The English Colonies in the Eighteenth Century, 1689-1763."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google