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■Essential Question: –In what ways were the “Southern” and “Northern” British colonies different from each other? ■Warm-Up Question: –How were the British.

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Presentation on theme: "■Essential Question: –In what ways were the “Southern” and “Northern” British colonies different from each other? ■Warm-Up Question: –How were the British."— Presentation transcript:

1 ■Essential Question: –In what ways were the “Southern” and “Northern” British colonies different from each other? ■Warm-Up Question: –How were the British Colonies influenced by the Trans-Atlantic trade?

2 ■Essential Question: –In what ways were the “Southern” and “Northern” British colonies different from each other? ■Warm-Up Question: –Examine each of the documents provided and explain how each relates to the British colonies –The documents are on the back of yesterday’s notes

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5 Regional Differences Among the British Colonies

6 The Economies of the Colonies ■The British colonies produced a variety of profitable materials & were populated by a variety of diverse peoples ■By the 1700s, the differences among the “Southern” & “Northern” colonies led to long-term differences among these societies

7 “Southern” Colonies “Northern” Colonies

8 Life in the “Southern” Colonies ■The Southern economies were dominated by cash-crop agriculture –Tobacco in VA, MD, & NC –Rice & indigo in SC & GA ■As a result, Southern society centered on: –Plantations rather than cities –Gaps between the rich & poor –Forced labor (slaves & servants)

9 Life in the “Southern” Colonies

10 ■By the 1700s, the Southern colonies became more diverse: –English colonists typically made up the plantation owners in the nutrient-rich lands in the east –Former indentured servants, German, Scots-Irish immigrants moved to the “backcountry” with poor soil, near Indians, & lived on the brink of poverty

11 European African Immigrants Distribution of European & African Immigrants in British North America by 1770 The North American “Backcountry”

12 Women in the “Southern” Colonies ■Women in Southern society found their lives dominated by men: –Women were not eligible to vote, divorce, own or sell property –“Common” women were responsible for assisting in the field in addition to cleaning, cooking, & childrearing chores –Upper-class women had slaves or servants, but had few rights

13 Women in “Southern” Colonies

14 Slavery in the “Southern” Colonies ■Slavery in the Southern colonies was far more common than in the Northern colonies: –Cash-crop agriculture, like tobacco & rice, required workers –By 1660, fewer indentured servants were coming to America –80-90% of Southern slaves were field workers, most on plantations

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16 Slavery in the “Southern” Colonies ■Slave culture in the South: –Slaves came from a variety of places in West Africa & had a variety of languages & cultures –Music & dance were used to maintain their African culture –Families were common, but marriage was not recognized –Slave religion often blended African rituals with Christianity

17 Slave Life Slave Spiritual Ex of Gullah Language Poem “Just Waitin’ ”

18 The Slave Population ■Slavery led to resistance: –Runaway slaves were common –Sabotaging of field tools & intentionally slowing down the work were common techniques of slave resistance Stono Rebellion –In 1739, in South Carolina 150 slaves led the Stono Rebellion against white plantation owners

19 “Northern” Colonies

20 Life in the “Northern” Colonies ■Northern economies were much more diverse than in the South: –Were restricted to much smaller farms that grew multiple crops –Included wheat, corn, livestock, lumber, shipbuilding, fishing, iron –Boston, Philadelphia, New York were important port cities that allowed for international trade

21 Life in the “Northern” Colonies

22 ■Like the Southern colonies, English, Germans, & Scots-Irish were the major immigrant groups & most moved to the backcountry as small-scale farmers ■Slaves worked on small-scale farms or as domestic servants ■Northern women could not vote or own property & were to serve & obey their husbands

23 European African Immigrants Distribution of European & African Immigrants in British North America by 1770

24 Social Mobility ■Northern colonies offered greater social mobility than the South: –Social status was less dependent upon ownership of land –Numerous professional & trade professions in cities –Benjamin Franklin represented opportunities in colonial society; He used scientific innovation & political writing to gain world fame

25 The Great Awakening

26 Decline in Religious Devotion ■By the 1700s, American colonists saw a decline in religious devotion: –Church sermons were seen by many as “cold” & impersonal ■In the 1730s & 1740s, the Great Awakening was a series of revivals in which people experienced religious conversion in response to gifted preaching

27 The Great Awakening ■Preachers like Jonathan Edwards & George Whitefield were the most popular evangelists: –Used “fire & passion” to encourage people to examine their eternal destiny (“New Light”) –Preached sermons to 1,000s in large “camp revivals” –Encouraged questioning of established churches

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29 The Great Awakening ■The Great Awakening impacted all the colonists & led to: –New universities were formed to educate “New Light” preachers –Contact among scattered colonists in different regions (1 st “national” American event) –Decline in Puritan & Anglican faiths & rise of Methodists, Baptists, & other denominations Brown, Rutgers, & Princeton

30 Creative Writing Assignment ■Create an illustrated journal from the perspective of someone from the colonial-era: –Students will be assigned a role –Create a journal entry written to a loved one who lives far away –Letters must have at least total 5 facts (gov’t, social, economic) –Letters must have 1 picture –Letters make 1 comparison to a person of a different role

31 ■Owner of a Virginia tobacco plantation ■Virginia indentured servant ■The wife of a Virginia tobacco plantation owner ■Slave on a Virginia tobacco plantation ■Merchant from Philadelphia ■A Native American living on the border of Georgia and Spanish Florida ■A fisherman living in Massachusetts ■A Puritan minister living in Salem, MA ■A “dissenter” living in Rhode Island ■The wife of a Puritan minister in New England ■A “house slave” in Pennsylvania ■A member of King Philip’s Wampanoag tribe living on the edge of New England settlements


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